Robin Baumgarten

line-wobbler
file 2019
‘Line Wobbler’ is a one-dimensional dungeon crawler with a custom controller made out of a steel spring and a five-metre long LED strip display. The entire game runs on an Arduino, with sound, particle effects and 120+fps. ‘Line Wobbler’ is an award-winning experiment in minimalism in game design, making use of novel input mechanics, retro sound, and the incorporation of physical architectural space into the game. In the game, players navigate obstacles and fight enemies to reach the exit, in a series of increasingly difficult levels. Movement is controlled by bending the Wobble controller forward and back, while enemies are attacked by flicking the spring at them. Obstacles such as lava fields, conveyor belts and slopes challenge the navigation skills of the player.

JACOB TONSKI

Balance From Within
File Festival
Jacob Tonski is a pragmatic optimist whose work explores dynamic balance through kinetic metaphors.
A self-adjusting platform makes everyone the same height, probing ideas of equality and the origins of power. A larger-than-life top spins about the room, wobbling through themes of pleasure, danger, youth and decay. A sofa teeters, standing on one leg, musing on the stability of the social structures we build.
These and other human-scale objects, both amusing and threatening, find an uncanny identity between toys and tools. The forces of time and gravity serve in these works as foils for those things we are powerless to direct in our lives, and with which we must instead dance and negotiate.

FABIEN GIRAUD AND RAPHAEL SIBONI

THE OUTLAND
The Outland is a large black box, perched atop hydraulic legs, that bounces and dives unpredictably, shudders and shakes, tips and wobbles, to the point you might be afraid it will fall over. It is in fact a flight simulator ride, with no door and no external markings. As soon as you learn that, the box becomes more and more intriguing, inciting imaginary flight paths as you try to reconcile the visible movement of the box with what sort of vision the imaginary audience inside would be experiencing.

JACQUELINE KIYOMI GORDON

LISTEN WITH HEADPHONES
由杰奎琳·吉米·戈登(Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon)在旧金山Yerba Buena艺术中心(YBCA)的新展览系列“控制:文化中的技术,无时无刻不在发生”中建造,是一种塑造声音,运动和感知的装置。该装置雄心勃勃,具有建筑雄心,需要探索一个房间,房间内布满11.1.4环绕立体声系统和定制的减震声板,以突出艺术家所描述的“声音之间移动,声音内部移动之间的交换”的含义。雕塑,与其他人一起移动”,并在此过程中产生“亲密感”。借用消音室和声学测试实验室中使用的隔音板的材料和几何形状,戈登的身临其境的声音环境部署了临床声音设计,以进行探索和互动。
位于“戈登(Gordon)”空间中央的位置是“爱的座位(Love Seat)”,这是一对相邻的围墙,游客可以坐在那里聆听。聆听者共享一个共同的视线,但在身体上是分开的,他们可以在相对(相对)的声音隔离中享受片刻。在展览随附的文章中,“控制:文化中的技术”策展人策奇·莫斯(Ceci Moss)简洁地将戈登的方法描述为“调音的情绪”,以“进入并指挥”进入该空间的人。
不出所料,戈登竭尽全力地雕刻了《永远发生的一切》中的音响效果,在展览中她看到她与Meyer Sound Laboratories的专家紧密合作。她在下面的视频中简要地介绍了她的过程,并且值得深入研究创建者在该项目上的帖子,因为它提供了一些有价值的“细节”,以及合作者Jon Leidecker(又名Wobbly)和Zackery Belanger的评论。

TACITA DEAN

Turbine Hall

The Turbine Hall of Tate Modern is plunged into deep black gloom. At its east end, like the stained glass window of a cathedral, is a giant vertical screen. It is framed at the edges with sprocket holes, so we feel we are looking at a vast reel of film. In the centre, an ever-changing series of images: a snail on a wind-wobbled leaf, the powerful spume of a fountain, a chimney loosing trails of vapour. Sometimes the image is of the back wall of the Turbine Hall itself, but with its gridded form coloured in red, yellow and blue so it resembles a Mondrian. Or with a giant egg apparently floating from ceiling to floor.

Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon

It Only Happens All of the Time

Constructed by Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon within San Francisco’s Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA) new exhibition series Control: Technology in Culture, It Only Happens All of the Time is an installation that shapes sound, movement, and perception. Architectural in ambition, the installation tasks visitors with exploring a room lined with a droning 11.1.4 surround sound system and custom sound-dampening acoustic panels in order to foreground what the artist describes as the “the exchange between moving within the sound, moving within the sculpture, moving with someone else” and yielding an “intimacy” in the process. Borrowing the materials and geometries of the acoustic panels used in anechoic chambers and acoustic testing labs, Gordon’s immersive sonic environment deploys clinical sound design to engender exploration and interaction.Positioned in the centre of Gordon’s space is “Love Seat”, a pair of adjoined enclosures where visitors can sit and listen. While sharing a common sightline—but physically separated—listeners can enjoy a moment together, each within (relative) acoustic isolation. In the essay accompanying the exhibition, Control: Technology in Culture curator Ceci Moss succinctly describes Gordon’s approach as “sound modulating mood” to “both commune and command” those entering the space.As would be expected, Gordon went to great lengths to sculpt the acoustics within It Only Happens All of the Time and the exhibition saw her working closely with specialists at Meyer Sound Laboratories. She touches on her process briefly in the video below and the Creator’s Project post on the project is worth delving into, as it provides some worthwhile ‘making of’ details as well as comments from collaborators Jon Leidecker (aka Wobbly) and Zackery Belanger.

Jacob Tonski

Balance Study Apparatus
Jacob Tonski is a pragmatic optimist whose work explores dynamic balance through kinetic metaphors.
A self-adjusting platform makes everyone the same height, probing ideas of equality and the origins of power. A larger-than-life top spins about the room, wobbling through themes of pleasure, danger, youth and decay. A sofa teeters, standing on one leg, musing on the stability of the social structures we build. These and other human-scale objects, both amusing and threatening, find an uncanny identity between toys and tools. The forces of time and gravity serve in these works as foils for those things we are powerless to direct in our lives, and with which we must instead dance and negotiate.