Aisha Zeijpveld

What Remains

Aisha Zeijpveld

source: highlike

About: Focusing on the pastel palette, Dutch artist Aisha Zeijpveld creates portraits that prevail. In her ‘What Remains’ series, inspired by the work of Egon Schiele, she introduces a way of ‘sketching’ onto the photographs, outlining the figure in interesting ways and modifying body shapes to something slightly abnormal. […] I am looking forward to seeing what direction her intriguing techniques will take next.

About the fashion series: ‘What remains’ (2012), Aisha Zeijpveld Sketches from austrian artist Egon Schiele were the starting point for photographer Aisha Zeijpveld to make the fashion series ‘What remains’. Schiele’s sketches show ‘unfinished’ figures. For ‘What remains’ Aisha translated this way of sketching in her photographs. By cutting out silhouettes in cardboard, she forces her characters in unfamiliar and not self-chosen shapes. Arms and shoulders, in uncomfortable poses, dissolve in their cardboard background. By using optical illusions, dimensions become obscured and the superficial reality is never what it appears to be. (Roos Menkhorst) This series was nominated and therefore appears in the New Dutch Photography Talent 2012 guide Credits Photography: Aisha Zeijpveld Styling: Renske van der ploeg Model: Dariuz Voltra Co-creation: Sara Ivanyi Artefacts: Sara Ivanyi Make-up/hair: Liselotte van Saarloos Model: Kelly Alexandre Co-creation: Judith Veenendaal Make-up/hair: Charlotte Niketic Photography assistent: Edward van Gijn Special thanks to Hazazah film & photography and Arjan Benning.
Photographer: Aisha Zeijpveld
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source: agonistica

Sketches from austrian artist Egon Schiele were the starting point for photographer Aisha Zeijpveld to make the fashion series ‘What remains’. Schiele’s sketches show ‘unfinished’ figures. For ‘What remains’ Aisha translated this way of sketching in her photographs. By cutting out silhouettes in cardboard, she forces her characters in unfamiliar and not self-chosen shapes. Arms and shoulders, in uncomfortable poses, dissolve in their cardboard background. By using optical illusions, dimensions become obscured and the superficial reality is never what it appears to be. (Roos Menkhorst)

This series was nominated and therefore appears in the New Dutch Photography Talent 2012 guide

Aisha Zeijpveld (1983) obtained her degree at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague.

Living in Amsterdam she works as freelancer for a variety of commercial magazines, while continuously pursuing her personal work. Zeijpveld’s focus on people their nakedness and vulnerability yet simultaneously their potency and pride characterizes her photography. She aims for the absurd, allowing her photographs to be posited on the interface of reality and dream-world, while always maintaining their functionality and clarity.
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source: trendhunter

By crafting bodily optical illusions, the Aisha Zeijpveld ‘What Remains’ series obscures reality. These captures were taken by Amsterdam-based photographer Aisha Zeijpveld. According to her website, Zeijpveld’s “focus on people their nakedness and vulnerability yet simultaneously their potency and pride characterizes her photography.” In order to create that capacity in her work, the ‘What Remains’ series was based around the sketches of Austrian artist Egon Schiele. By translating these sketches into photographs, Zeijpveld recreates the expressive figures portrayed by Schiele often were “unfinished.”

Zeijpveld positions her models into intricate body positions that provide an awkward stiffness allowing for their silhouettes to dissolve into the cardboard backgrounds. This technique enhances the “unfinished” nature of the photographs providing an sense of absurdism to the portraits. This amalgamation of dreams and reality is what Zeijpveld is after.
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source: smileinyourface

My name is Aisha Zeijpveld. I am a photographer living in Amsterdam and I’m 28 years old.

I would like to tell you about one of my first memories with photography.
When I turned sixteen I was given a second hand photo-projector to print my own pictures. I was very excited. Printing in the dark with the smell of chemicals felt almost romantic. That first night my best friend joined me in the darkroom and we stayed there for hours completely obsessed by the process of printing.

It was 5 am in the morning when we found some mysterious black and white negatives, hidden in an envelope between old unprinted photo paper. My friend and I immediately put one of the negatives in the projector. When the chemicals slowly made the image appear we blushed; these pictures were obviously not meant for our eyes! They were extremely sexual in nature and very explicit, which of course, being 16 years old, made us giggly. But most of all embarrased. These were pictures taken years ago by a couple I knew very well.

“We tore the picture in two for both of us to keep a part, as a souvenir.”

Aisha Zeijpveld (1983) obtained her degree at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague.

With her graduation project she was nominated by ArtOlive for young upcoming talent 2009. Living in Amsterdam she works as freelancer for a variety of magazines and cultural institutions, while continuously pursuing her personal work. Zeijpveld focusses on people their nakedness and vulnerability yet simultaneously their potency and pride characterizes her photography. She aims for the absurd, allowing her photographs to balance on the boundaries of reality and dream-worlds, while always maintaining their functionality and clarity. (Sterre van Rossem)
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source: isopixel

Aisha Zeijpveld es un fotógrafo. Trabaja de manera comercial como revistas y marcas independientes, sin dejar de lado sus proyectos independientes, en los cuales le gusta retratar la fuerza y orgullo de las personas, al tiempo que capta su desnudez y vulnerabilidad.

En este proyecto personal llamado “What remains” toma como inspiración los dibujos inconclusos de Egon Schiele y crea imágenes similares a partir de fotografías.