Aki Sasomoto

Centrifugal March

Aki Sasomoto   Centrifugal March

source: artslant

According to ancient Egyptian burial practice, the dead were buried with certain goods that were thought to accompany them through their afterlife. These objects could range from everyday goods such as pottery and grain to luxury items such as furniture and even jewels. In certain Mongolian Buddhist traditions, after death the body is taken away from the village and laid out in the open with a stone outline placed around it. Once natural predators have consumed the body, the stone outline forms a referent to the dead person. In contemporary Buddhist traditions in Japan, the corpse is put on dry ice contained in a casket with a selection of items that the deceased was fond of such as candies or even cigarettes. Hence it feels almost universal that after a person’s death certain objects become referents to the deceased one. The nature of this transference may be so complete that it begins to feel that in her afterlife she is the rocking chair she would sit on while she told us tales of her childhood adventures or that he somehow is the black umbrella that he never ventured out without even on clear days.

When you are in the midst of a chaotic arrangement of unrelated objects suspended from the ceiling, strewn on the floor, or jutting out of the wall, you hardly imagine what appears to be a physics experiment will turn out to be a deliberation on death and memory. Aki Sasamoto, in her performance, Centrifugal March, yokes Classical mechanics with the philosophy of death as she explains the phenomenon under whose influence “Humans become Objects with its Centrifugal Force.”(1)

Lumps of ice tied from the ceiling with colourful shoe-laces melt, water droplets falling into steel bowls placed below the ice. With the background score of the dripping water, Sasamoto darts across the room with her marker, at one point assuming the role of a school-teacher-like character, explaining centrifugal and centripetal force by drawing a spiral diagram on the wall. At another moment in the performance, she gracefully steered a discomfortingly coffin-like cupboard with wheels around the room, breathlessly talking about death, funeral rituals and remembrance of the deceased through their possessions. Sasamoto engages her audience as she deliriously bores holes through a huge bar of ice and talks of the ritual of the body of the dead being preserved on ice. In her staccato movements around the room she threw a dart at the spiral diagram on the wall and almost hit an audience member. Watching her furiously stab ice blobs arranged in the room, one gets the sense that she is not aware of her audience. Sasamoto talks of her grandmother’s pearl necklace as something that she prizes and treasures after the relative’s demise. The object becomes more than a memorial, it somehow takes the place of the person altogether.

In her research of death rituals in India, the U.S.-based Japanese artist visited crematoriums, doctors and astrologers to note the matter-of-fact way in which death is dealt with in the country. In her spiral diagram she seemed to depict her perception of this attitude through its origin in the common Hindu and Buddhist belief that life and death are an unending cycle. The performance worked as a meta-critical piece as it pointed towards the very nature of performance art — a life lived twice over. The characteristics of a live performance are akin to human life in Sasamoto’s philosophy – lived through a mortal body and then embodied in a material object that becomes a referent to the deceased. A performance must be ephemeral, yet the second time around the performance is lived through memory. Thus performance is a kind of death. Aki Sasamoto’s performance writes an epitaph for an art form that must perform its own death to be remembered ad infinitum.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: cargocollective

Why do certain objects seem to carry more importance over others? i am suspecting some exert gravitational force, based on one’s memory of the dead. Imagining my after life as an object, i start to travel along centrifugal force to mock a transformation into an object. A wooden bead, diamond necklace, green jumpsuit, or poem on a restaurant napkin.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: apksco

아키 사사모토는 뉴욕을 기반으로 활동하는 일본인 미술가로, 퍼포먼스, 조각, 무용, 소규모 바 톡 등 자신의 생각을 전할 수 있는 모든 매체를 사용한다. 설치 퍼포먼스에서 사사모토는 조각적으로 변형된 오브제들을 세심하게 배치하고 그 가운데에서 움직이고 말을 해가며 일상적 삶 이면의 기괴한 감성을 불러일으킨다. 부조리로 가득한 그녀의 과잉 행위들은 관객들의 의식에 유쾌한 불편함을 야기하면서 우주 만물을 구성하는 구조들에 혼란을 야기한다. 광주비엔날레에 전시되는 “원심성 행군(Centrifugal March,2012)”은 돌아가신 할아버지의 주판에서 영감을 받은 작품이다. 사사모토에 의하면 “사물은 구심력에 의해 인간이 되고 인간은 원심력에 의해 사물이 된다.” 사후에 죽은 사람의 존재를 구성하는, 또 사람과 사물 사이의 상호 관계를 이루는 유품이라는 개념은 그녀의 작품에서 신체적인 경험으로 변형된다. 이미지와 사운드, 얼음, 통, 그릇과 같은 일상적 사물과 기구들, 그밖에 온갖 요소들을 유동적이고 역동적인 관계로 연결하는 사사모토의 설치는 일시적 상황이 계속 이어지는 일련의 연속 현상으로 이해된다. 또한 그녀의 작품은 초현(超弦) 이론, 우주를 지배하는 거시적 작동 원리, 그리고 고대 아시아의 우주론과 관련된 철학적인 접근을 통해 물질과 물질을 서로 연결시키는 점에서, 다시 말해 비가시적 에너지를 암시하는 물리학 기반의 접근법과도 화해를 이루는 점에서 놀라운 균형감을 보여주는 실험이다.
사사모토의 작품은 독일 도이치 구겐하임, 요코하마트리엔날레, 테이크 니나가와 갤러리(일본), 제롬 조도 컨템포러리(이탈리아), 초콜릿 팩토리 극장, 더 키친, 2010 휘트니비엔날레, 그레이터 뉴욕(MoMA-PS1, 뉴욕) 등을 통해 국제적으로 소개되어 왔으며, 시각예술가, 음악가, 안무가, 학자 등과도 협업을 진행한다. 사사모토는 뉴욕의 ‘컬쳐 푸쉬’의 공동 설립자이기도 하다.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: undonet

Aki Sasamoto è una delle figure più interessanti del panorama contemporaneo giapponese, dopo aver partecipato alla Triennale di Yokohama nel 2008, si è imposta sulla scena performativa internazionale partecipando alla Biennale del Whitney nel 2010, alla mostra The Greater New York: 5 Year Review presso il Moma PS1 di New York, passando per Mosca al Garage Center for Contemporary Culture.

Tra gli ultimi interventi, una personale nella sezione Frame di Frieze con Take Nina Gawa Gallery, Londra nel 2011, una partecipazione al centro espositivo Lalit Kara Academy, a Nuova Delhi, in India e a breve una mostra al Hessel Museum of Art, Bard College, di New York.

In un frasario espressivo che accoglie diversi ambiti della rappresentazione visiva, dalla scrittura fisiologica all’assemblaggio scultoreo attraverso l’azione performativa, la ricerca della giovane Sasamoto si mescola inevitabilmente con la propria cultura natia, confluendo in un territorio che resta sempre ai margini del quotidiano, in cui oggetti, presenze e gestualità assumono sempre nuove prospettive interrogando la complessità, l’eterogeneità e la varietà degli eventi e delle cose.

Mentre l’interazione risulta alla base di ogni sua installazione, lo spirito d’indagine diviene la costante della creazione performativa.

Perché alcuni oggetti sembrano apparire più importanti rispetto ad altri (Centrifugal March, 2012) ? Da che cosa è costituito il nostro senso di salute o di estetica? Come si misura l’aggressione nel quadro della bellezza (Beauty Lines, 2010)?
L’esplorazione delle diverse incognite, costituisce lo sviluppo dell’azione che viene accolta gradualmente da pose e movenze propedeutiche; ritmi, passaggi e trasformazioni disegnano le linee di una coralità spaziale che serve al solo equilibrio, fra le forme ed il corpo dell’artista.

Nella struttura dialogica dei suoi lavori, il formalismo e l’espressività di una parola, di un gesto o di un oggetto superano il funzionalismo dei medesimi, dando origine ad una poetica che si avvale dell’assurdo e dell’improbabile come unica fonte d’immaginazione.

Attraverso le diverse vignette performative, Drawers Eats Memory, Airport Bathroom, Pickling Pot, and X x Y =1, l’artista esamina i principi del proprio legame materno, dalla parentesi adolescenziale alle ultime esperienze, il rapporto viene analizzato e proiettato su di un binario relazionale in cui due individui non riescono a comunicare.

Nello spazio della stimolazione creativa di Aki Sasamoto convivono molti elementi della tradizione giapponese, ad esempio il richiamo al Mitate, l’arte della citazione che vuole nella disposizione di oggetti comuni, il riferimento ad immagini popolari o mitologiche.

La disposizione degli oggetti visibili amplifica la percezione della realtà assoluta, dando forma e permettendo alla memoria collettiva di rivelarsi.

Sulla scia di questi concetti, un oggetto rivela diversi significati quando viene inserito al di fuori del proprio contesto, evocando la totalità della relazione culturale. Nei lavori di Aki Sasamoto emerge la volontà di disporre l’invisibile attraverso l’ordine visibile delle cose, questa pratica evidenzia la struttura cosmologica delle sue rappresentazioni.

Incontrando sempre il discorso spaziale, diverso, a secondo dei contesti in cui interviene, l’azione dell’artista diviene totemica, ogni oggetto come ogni avvenimento è per lei uno strumento connettivo, mentale e sociale, non più solo legato alla propria fisicità o identità.

“The border that I thought was mathematically non-existent can start to express its presence aloud”.
(Il confine che ho sempre pensato fosse logicamente inesistente può iniziare ad esprimere la propria presenza ad alta voce)
(A.S.)

Aki Sasamoto è nata nel 1980 a Yokohama in Giappone. Trasferitasi a New York, consegue un MFA in Arti Visive presso la Columbia University nel 2007. Il suo lavoro è stato presentato in diversi ed importanti manifestazioni artistiche internazionali: alla terza Edizione della Yokohama Triennale (2008); Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin (2008); Zach Feuer Gallery, New York (2009); The Kitchen, New York (2009); Whitney Biennial, New York (2010; The Greater New York, MOMA PS1 (2010); Garage Center
for Contemporary Culture, Mosca, Russia (2010); Frame section con Take Nina Gawa Gallery, Frieze Art Fair (2011); Lalit Kara Academy, New Delhi, India (2012); Take Ninagawa Gallery, Tokyo, Giappone (2010 e 2012); Hessel Museum of Art, Bard College, New York (2012). Inoltre Aki Sasamoto è co-fondatrice dell’organizzazione Culture Push di New York.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: cargocollective

Aki Sasamoto is a New York-based, Japanese artist, who works in performance, sculpture, dance, and whatever more medium that takes to get her ideas across. Her works have been shown both in performing art and visual art venues in New York and abroad. Besides her own works, she has collaborated with artists in visual arts, music, and dance, and she plays multiple roles of dancer, sculptor, or director. Sasamoto co-founded Culture Push, a non-profit arts organization, in which diverse professionals meet through artist-led projects and cross-disciplinary symposia.

Sasamoto’s performance/installation works revolve around everyday gestures on nothing and everything. Her installations are careful arrangements of sculpturally altered found objects, and the decisive gestures in her improvisational performances create feedback, responding to sound, objects, and moving bodies. The constructed stories seem personal at first, yet oddly open to variant degrees of access, relation, and reflection.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: whitneyorg

Aki Sasamoto’s installations and performances explore the nuances and peculiarities of everyday life. She uses sculpture, movement, video, and sound to transform mundane actions into theatrical events. Strange Attractors consists of a careful arrangement of sculpturally altered, found objects that take on new roles and provide guidance for Sasamoto’s improvisational performances that take place within the installation. The performances demonstrate Sasamoto’s attempt to understand the mathematic structure of the Lorenz Attractor, a fractal structure that works in a dynamic system. For her performances, Sasamoto also includes additional objects related to her recent obsessions with, among other things, doughnuts, fortune-tellers, and hemorrhoids.