ALWIN LAY

Permanent Sparkler

Alwin Lay

source: highlike

Work: Alwin Lay – Permanent Sparkler, 2012 82×62 cm, C-Print courtesy Natalia Hug Gallery “To pass the time – pastime.” outtake of a text by G.Leddington The sparkler – a hand-held firework popular with children – is photographically caught mis-behaving. The sparks (perhaps with a knowing nod to those images that exploit long exposure times to write words in the night) rather than progress along the stick in the usual linear fashion, appear to be alight all at once thus creating a photographic loop whereby not only the ‘moment’ of the image (as happens with all photography) but also the act depicted have had their ends and beginnings stitched together in direct defiance of what we know should causally happen in this endless fotographic loop.
Photographer: Alwin Lay
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source: dustmagazine

Alwin Lay’s interventions begin with the meticulous representation of objects. While initially this seems to be Lay’s primary concern, the representations open up for further reflection: a sparkler that never stops burning, a coffee machine drowning itself, a transparent light meter. Lay confronts the viewer’s perception with the physical properties of objects and questions their representability in media. Alwin Lay (b.1984) studied with professor Christopher Williams at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf parallel to his studies at the Kunsthochschule für Medien in Co­logne. His upcoming exhibitions will take place in Deichtorhallen Haus der Photographie, Hamburg; Museum Villa Stuck, Munich and Goethe-Institut Los Angeles, CA, Washington DC, USA and Mexico city as part of the Gute Aussichten – Junge Deutsche Fotografie // New German Photography 2013/2014.
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source: ilikethisart

“Alwin Lay’s interventions begin with the meticulous representation of objects. While initially this seems to be Lay’s primary concern, the representations open up for further reflection: a sparkler that never stops burning, a coffee machine drowning itself, a transparent light meter. Lay confronts the viewer’s perception with the physical properties of objects and questions their representability in media.” – Natalia Hug Gallery