ANNE TYNG

Anatomy of Form
The Divine Proportion in the Platonic Solids

source: projectprojects

Anne Tyng: Inhabiting Geometry presents the sculptural works of the visionary architect, theorist, and pioneer of habitable space-frame architecture. After working closely with Louis Kahn and influencing many of his major works, Tyng went on to independently conduct a life-long study of advanced geometry, mathematical forms, and their application to built forms in a range of scales. The 2011 exhibition, presented at the Institute of Contemporary Art Philadelphia and Graham Foundation in Chicago, featured room-size models of five platonic solids created in collaboration with architect Srdjan Weiss. Project Projects designed a catalogue with documentation from both installations, in addition to supplementary materials, including drawings, plans, models, and an illustrated timeline of Tyng’s significant life and work.
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source: core77

The title of the exhibition and her works belie the understated beauty of their execution, which demonstrate the expressive power of order and geometry. Tyng’s unique command of form is matched by her raw intellect; thus, she elegantly articulates her vision in the models seen here.

In fact, the Graham Foundation recognized Tyng’s talent nearly half a century ago in 1965, when she was awarded for her project Anatomy of Form: The Divine Proportion in the Platonic Solids:
In her research she developed a theory of hierarchies of symmetry—symmetries within symmetries—and a search for architectural insight and revelation in the consistency and beauty of all underlying form.
It’s fascinating stuff, and the images alone have piqued my interest in Tyng’s theories, which cover topics from Jungian cycles to the cosmos.

Tyng (b. 1920 in Jiangxi, China) was one of the first women to earn a Masters in Architecture from Harvard. She spent nearly three decades collaborating with Louis Kahn before shifting her focus to research at the University of Pennsylvania in the late 60’s.

The title of the exhibition and her works belie the understated beauty of their execution, which demonstrate the expressive power of order and geometry. Tyng’s unique command of form is matched by her raw intellect; thus, she elegantly articulates her vision in the models seen here.

In fact, the Graham Foundation recognized Tyng’s talent nearly half a century ago in 1965, when she was awarded for her project Anatomy of Form: The Divine Proportion in the Platonic Solids:
In her research she developed a theory of hierarchies of symmetry—symmetries within symmetries—and a search for architectural insight and revelation in the consistency and beauty of all underlying form.
It’s fascinating stuff, and the images alone have piqued my interest in Tyng’s theories, which cover topics from Jungian cycles to the cosmos.

Tyng (b. 1920 in Jiangxi, China) was one of the first women to earn a Masters in Architecture from Harvard. She spent nearly three decades collaborating with Louis Kahn before shifting her focus to research at the University of Pennsylvania in the late 60’s.