BRIAN ENO

Брайан Ино
브라이언 이노
ブライアン·イーノ
בריאן אינו
براين إينو
Брайан Ино

baby’s on fire

source: stereolpblogspot

A brilliant conceptualist, a founding member of Roxy Music, and a self-described “non musician,” the appallingly prolific Brian Eno is probably best known as a producer — he was behind the boards for some of the best albums made by David Bowie, Talking Heads, Devo, and U2 — and for having coined the phrase “ambient music.” A pity, that; Eno has also made wonderful music of his own, recording entrancing tunes with ingenious counter melodies that should have been hits, but weren’t.

Pop content is just one component in the Eno catalogue and melody doesn’t seem to interest him half as much as sound itself. Consequently, trawling through the Eno catalogue can be as frustrating as it is rewarding, especially as his later albums tend more toward music that seems airy, empty, and maddeningly diffuse.

In that sense, perhaps the best way to approach the Eno oeuvre is by forgetting chronology and diving in with the box sets. I: Instrumentals is a delightful omnibus of sound sketches, studio experiments, and sonic art. Some of it is from collaborations with Bowie, avant-pop trumpeter Jon Hassell, minimalist composer Harold Budd, King Crimson guitarist Robert Fripp, or the German electro group Cluster; some is from solo work using his own keyboards or session musicians. Invariably, Eno finds a certain idiosyncratic element in the sounds produced, and tickles them out. When his teasing tends toward atmospheric stasis, the results are generally dubbed “ambient” — sort of like New Age gets an MFA. But not everything there falls into that category; some tracks, such as “Energy Fools the Magician” or “Chemin de Fer,” are as catchy and well-crafted as any pop single.

The second box, II: Vocals, has far more of that, and relies heavily on Eno’s early albums. Applying what he learned about pop subversion from his tenure in Roxy Music to the revisionist aesthetic of new-wave rock, songs such as “Baby’s On Fire,” “King’s Lead Hat,” and “Here Come the Warm Jets” boast all the hook-driven appeal of hit singles, yet without the heard-it-before predictability of conventional pop. Eno rarely took the conventional give-the-singer-the-melody approach, however, and on a number of tracks, the vocal — which may be song, or speech, or some “found” bit of a movie or radio broadcast — is just part of the overall sound, often almost incidental to the instrumental parts.

For fans of his vocal music, the key Eno albums are Here Come the Warm Jets, Taking Tiger Mountain (by Strategy), and Before and After Science. It may be easy to hear in both an anticipation of punk and an echo of Roxy Music in the arch clangor of Here Come the Warm Jets, but what shines brightest is the offhand accessibility of the songs. It hardly matters whether he’s playing with style (as with the doo-wop undercurrent to “Cindy Tells Me”) or fooling with form (the portmanteau construction of “Dead Finks Don’t Talk”); the melodies linger on. Listening to it now, the album seems almost a blueprint for the pop experiments Bowie (with Eno producing) would conduct with Low.

Taking Tiger Mountain (by Strategy) is just as pop-friendly and eclectic, but shies away from the abrasive textures of its predecessor, swapping distortion and dissonance for blurred edges and open-ended harmonies. Not that the album is entirely without teeth, as there’s an itchy aggression to the breathless “Third Uncle” and an ominous urgency to the latter half of “The True Wheel.” But Eno keeps such snarls on a tight leash; far more typical is the dry wit of “Back in Judy’s Jungle.”

But it’s Before and After Science that stands as the greatest of Eno’s “pop” albums. A nearly perfect album, it frames Eno’s melodic instincts in every imaginable way, from the chilly funk of “No One Receiving” to the irrepressible vigor of “King’s Lead Hat” (an anagram for Talking Heads), to the dreamy cadences of “Here He Comes.”

After sitting out the 1980s, Eno returned to the pop form in 1990 with the brittle, uneven Wrong Way Up. Recorded with John Cale, it’s a good attempt at recapturing the old magic, but frankly Cale’s intense artiness undercuts Eno’s instincts. My Squelchy Life was originally intended as the follow-up, but after making advance copies available to the press, Eno withdrew the album (which is now available only on bootleg). Instead, the unexpectedly funky Nerve Net became his next pop effort, and it mostly fizzles. Perhaps sensing the tenor of the times, Eno puts more effort into making good grooves than in writing memorable melodies, and while the resulting tracks are full of good energy and interesting sounds, they lack the hooky good nature of Before and After Science.

Then again, after Eno’s having spent most of the previous decade releasing album after album on which texture was king, what were we to expect? Although some critics have derided his instrumental albums as being a sort of high-concept mood music, it wasn’t mood he was interested in; it was atmosphere. On these discs, he took an almost functional approach to music, manipulating its sonic power in the same way a painter or interior designer might manipulate the power of light, color, and form.

Eno began moving in that direction with Another Green World. Here, he uses the studio itself as an instrument, molding directed improvisation, electronic effects, and old-fashioned songcraft into perfectly balanced aural ecosystems such as “Sky Saw” or “St. Elmo’s Fire.” Initially, he referred to these quiet soundscapes as “discreet” music, and on Discreet Music (a wry deconstruction of “Pachelbel’s Canon in D”) demonstrates his basic tools: minimal melodies, subtle textures, and variable repetition. Around this time, he had also been collaborating with the German synth duo Cluster on a pair of moody, coloristic electronic albums, selections from which may be found on the Begegnungen and Begegnungen II compilations. But it was Music for Airports that finally codified these experiments into an aesthetic, and even provided a label for the sound: ambient music.

As much as Eno understands about psycho-acoustics and the relationship between what is heard and what is merely sensed, the largely functional (and mostly tuneless) nature of the music limits the listening pleasure of subsequent ambient releases, such as On Land, Apollo, and Thursday Afternoon. (Eno also produced albums by other artists for his ambient series: both Harold Budd’s rich, moody Plateaux of Mirror and Laraaji’s shimmering Day of Radiance are slightly more energetic and engaging than Eno’s own efforts.)

There were, of course, releases that didn’t carry the ambient tag but seemed part of the same musical subspecies. The three volumes of Music for Film work very much on the same principle as the ambient albums, and feature some of the same collaborators. Likewise, there’s an extreme emphasis on atmosphere in the spacey Shutov Assembly, the contemplative Neroli, and the delicately textured Drop.

Meanwhile, Eno continued to collaborate with others. My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, which takes its title from Amos Tutuola’s novel, was recorded with Talking Headman David Byrne, and offers some insight into the cut-and-paste approach to groove the two applied while making Talking Heads’ Remain in Light. Its “found art” approach to vocals (however scrupulously footnoted) is an acquired taste, but in hindsight it sounds like a true forerunner of hip-hop sampling. Spinner, recorded with former Public Image Ltd. bassist Jah Wobble, boasts gently insistent grooves and strongly Middle Eastern flavors, elements Eno had flirted with on the earlier Ali Click.

Eno also worked with the German DJ Jan Peter Schwalm. Their first collaboration, the Japanese-only Music for Onmyoji (literally, “Music for the Fortune-teller”), is a double album combining one disc of conventional, deftly crafted synth-scapes with a disc of manipulated and collaged recordings based on gagaku, the ancient traditional music of the Japanese Imperial Court. Drawn From Life is rather less exotic, relying on Western instrumentation and household sounds to generate a rich, surprisingly evocative sonic tapestry celebrating the rhythm of day-to-day life (hence the title).

There’s a third stream to Eno’s catalogue that isn’t represented by a box, and that’s his “installations.” These are sound sculptures created for specific environments; usually instrumental, they are not compositions in the traditional sense, with a beginning, middle, and end, but are open-ended constructions designed to go on indefinitely without looping or intentionally repeating the material. (Opal is Eno’s own label, and these discs are available online from www.enoshop.co.uk.) Some, such as Kite Stories or Compact Forest Proposal, for instance, come from environmental pieces in which multiple CD players, loaded with multiple discs, provide layers of music from varied locations. Obviously, the CD experience can only approximate the installation. Others, such as Lightness and I Dormienti, are more conventional ambient pieces. Perhaps the most interesting is January 07003: Bell Studies for the Clock of Long Now, which treats, toys with, and manipulates the sound of bells, a wonderfully transformative piece that provides new insight into everyday chiming.

More Blank Than Frank and Desert Island Selection are best-of albums emphasizing material from Warm Jets through Science. And Curiosities, Vol. 1 is essentially a collection of leftovers, tracks deemed by Eno too interesting to discard, but too singular to be included elsewhere. Completists only.

By the 1990s, Eno was an established voice in a range of contemporary music. In Low Symphony, composer Philip Glass spun off themes and variations of Bowie’s Low, a work indelibly marked by Eno’s stamp; ambient techno bands like the Orb and Irresistible Force owed an obvious debt to Eno. He has also long been interested in other media, his video installations having been exhibited at the Venice Biennale and the Pompidou Centre in Paris, and his 1996 autobiography, A Year (With Swollen Appendices) having provided an index of his omnivorous interests. Eno continued to expand the vocabulary of music into the new millennium, composing for video games and producing albums by artists ranging from veteran Paul Simon to newcomer Coldplay.

In 2004 he teamed up with old friend Fripp for another ambient collection, and in 2006 he celebrated the 25th anniversary of My Life in the Bush of Ghosts with Byrne. The latter project had feet in both the past and future, as the marketing plan included a Website wherein fans of the classic work could legally download multi-tracks of two songs, remix them and then repost them for others to hear. That same year, Eno released the visual work 77 Million Paintings, a DVD/software package offering computer screens a constantly evolving painting with an ambient-music background. In 2008, after nearly 30 years, Eno and Byrne again reconnected for Everything That Will Happen Will Happen Today, a follow up of sorts to My Life in the Bush of Ghosts.

As a composer, producer, keyboardist, singer and multi-media visual artist, Eno is responsible less for a new sound and look in pop than for an entirely new way of thinking about music — as an atmosphere, rather than a statement, an experiment in sound, rather than a virtuosic expression. Combining the cerebral qualities of European high culture with the technological outlook of a futurist, he also has been responsible for an aesthetic movement that incorporates both Western and Third World sounds.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: tododjjasambouvirgula

Nascido em 1948 numa região rural da Inglaterra, Eno já chegou com pinta de gente importante: batizado Brian Peter George St. John Le Baptiste de la Salle Eno, ele logo se viu obrigado a encurtar o nome. Influenciado pelo som de um dos pioneiros da música minimalista, o americano Steve Reich, antes dos 20 anos Eno já havia participado de algumas orquestras.Em 1971, Brian Eno passou a integrar o grupo que mais dava o que falar no momento, o Roxy Music, com suas roupas insanas e rock sofisticado. Era a vez do glam rock, e Brian Eno, devidamente vestido de mulher, passava a dividir as atenções com outro Bryan, o Ferry, com seus ternos elegantes e jeito de dandy.Depois de gravar dois LPs com a banda (Roxy Music, de 1972, e For Your Pleasure, de 1973), Brian Eno deixou para trás fãs ensandecidos, vestidos, batom e boás para mergulhar com tudo na música eletrônica.Em 1975, depois de lançar sua obra-prima da música minimalista, Another Green World, um acidente de carro deixou Eno de cama por vários meses, levando-o à criação de uma de suas marcas mais famosas, a ambient music. Eno pensou que a música, afinal, deveria ter as mesmas propriedades da luz ou das cores e se espalhar pelo ambiente sem atrapalhar o equilíbrio das coisas. Desta premissa surgiu o disco Discreet Music, o primeiro de um volume de dez trabalhos experimentais lançados por seu próprio selo, Obscure.

Já firme na ambient music, vieram dois trabalhos que ajudaram a espalhar a fama do gênero: em 1977, lançou Music for Films, uma coleção de fragmentos criados como trilha sonora de filmes imaginários e, em 1978, Music for Airports, um disco concebido para acalmar passageiros de avião apavorados.Ao mesmo tempo em que se tornava o papa da ambient, Eno se enfiava de cabeça no que havia de mais vanguardista na música eletrônica naquele momento, o krautrock, gênero de música libertário, muito dominado por ruídos, improvisação e instrumentos eletrônicos, que dominou o underground da Alemanha da virada dos anos 60 até a década de 70. Desse balaio onde o que valia era renegar a cultura anglo-americana, onde só o radicalismo importava, nasceram grupos como o Neu! e, muito mais popular, o Kraftwerk.Em 1977 e 78, Eno gravou dois discos com o grupo Kluster (Cluster & Eno e After The Heat). Outro produto com forte influência do período alemão são os três discos de David Bowie produzidos por Eno, para muita gente os melhores da carreira do camaleão até hoje: Low (77), Heroes (também de 77) e Lodger (de 79, que traz a curiosa faixa DJ, feita em parceria com Eno, uma visionária tiração de sarro do culto ao DJ – “Eu sou DJ/Eu sou o que toco/Tenho seguidores”.Ainda em 78, Eno produziu a pérola da new wave Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo!, estreia do grupo Devo, que trazia pitadas de sintetizadores, por sugestão do produtor. O mix de guitarras e batidas eletrônicas entrou para a história e ajudou a definir o som do Devo para sempre.Ainda nem chegamos aos anos 80, e o cara já tem história que daria para rechear filmes e livros. Dá mesmo pra achar alguns vídeos sobre ele na internet, mas eu recomendaria um bem recente, conduzido pelo próprio Brian Eno, que foi ao ar ano passado pelo canal inglês BBC Four. O nome é Arena – Brian Eno, Another Green World. É só vasculhar a internet que dá pra assistir ao filme inteiro, dividido em três partes.

Vendo o documentário dá para entender como sua mão foi importante no trabalho de uma certa banda irlandesa, que em 1984 cruzaria seu caminho. Naquele ano, Eno produziu o disco The Unforgettable Fire, o primeiro de vários (The Joshua Tree, Achtung Baby, Zooropa, All That You Can”t Leave Behind e No Line On The Horizon) que ele produziu para o U2.Você leu bastante coisa sobre Brian Eno, mas posso dizer que não é nem metade do que este multifacetado inglês já aprontou. Ainda tem trilha de games, trabalhos com artistas como Laurie Anderson, Talking Heads e Coldplay, seu lado artista plástico e até um jogo de cartas de baralho (Oblique Strategies), que ele inventou nos anos 70 e agora está disponível para iPhone etc. Seja através da caixa da Warp que acaba de sair (que custa US$ 99 mais a taxa de envio) ou por qualquer outra desculpa, é sempre tempo de conhecer o genial Brian Eno.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: snobgroundblogspot

El sonido y actitud tradicional del rockero, con algunas modificaciones obvias relacionadas a los cambios tecnológicos, ha permanecido más o menos igual en esencia. El rock debe remitir al sudor y lúbrica provocación de los movimientos de caderas de ELVIS PRESLEY. Desde el deificado residente de Graceland la imagen del rock puro es la de un grupo o artista que respira como una “entidad orgánica” llena de energía cinética, si tomamos la imagen proporcionada por el crítico Joe Carducci.

El rock se oponía a la cerebral música culta por su “calidez” o mejor dicho “calentura” escénica: bajo, guitarra y batería interactuando en tiempo real en un éxtasis físico de esfuerzo y visceralidad. El rockero por antonomasia es el que “lo da todo en el escenario” frente al calculado y frío lugar que ocupa un músico de orquesta el cual se encuentra despersonalizado, un elemento más del puzzle de la pieza clásica, meros interpretes de una obra preescrita por la genialidad del autor, el cual, ni siquiera debe encontrarse en el escenario. El rock es “autenticidad” y puesta en escena espontánea, o al menos es el “ethos” que se persigue. El artificio en el rock fue tardíamente recibido, y con muchas reservas.

Artificio o Autenticidad. Dos polaridades enfrentadas en la música popular contemporánea, probablemente falsamente radicalizadas, como todas las polarizaciones, pero no por eso menos reales en cuanto a “faros ideológicos” que guían la historia del rock-pop. Mientras en el arte canónico (la plástica, básicamente) no hay nada inocente y esto se asume como tal, en el rock, tradicionalmente más “naive” y menos proclive a las teorizaciones se cree todavía en los valores “puros” de la música como vehículo para “expresar” lo que “uno trae dentro”, de forma honesta y directa.

Es probablemente desde el Glam Rock que la idea del rock como medio “natural” de expresión se ha venido deformando. En el centro de esta tensión al interior del rock se encuentra el rol del estudio de grabación como campo de batalla simbólico, que trasciende la trastienda técnica. Es decir, el “como sonar y como no sonar” no es solamente una pregunta práctica, también teórica e incluso ideológica ya que esconde, como mínimo, dos maneras opuestas de entender el rock. Dos maneras que pueden ser ejemplificadas en las posturas contrapuestas de Steve Albini, por un lado y Brian Eno, por el otro. Varios motivos existen para considerar a estos dos productores musicales como personajes que se espejean.

Eno, de nacionaliad británica, fue un caso de genial precocidad desarrollada en un entorno desfavorable de pobreza y falta de comodidades típica de una familia de clase obrera.Como si quisiera escapar de ese entorno gris que son los barrios obreros ingleses, a los 16 años ya estaba estudiando arte y experimentando con el sonido. Había que escapar del mundo, no meterse más en el; Huir de las carencias y vulgaridades de “lo real”. Su primer trabajo como músico fue en la SCRATCH ORCHESTRA, agrupación dirigida por el compositor vanguardista Cornelius Cardew, también colaboró en la banda sonora de films de corte experimental. La ambición del explorador (y el conquistador) de planetas, fue desde joven, el motor que hacía andar a Brian Eno.

Steve Albini, norteamericano, aprendió a tocar el bajo en plena efervescencia del punk mientras se recuperaba de una fractura de pierna, pero su primer participación en un grupo fue como baterista en una banda de punk que pasó sin pena ni gloria llamada JUST DUCKY. Después estudiaría periodismo y cubriría la escena punk de la zona de Chicago, involucrándose en ella activamente, primero con la pluma y después con las cuatro y seis cuerdas en los irrepetibles BIG BLACK ,RAPEMAN y más recientemente en SHELLAC. En cierta medida, nunca dejaría el punk , incluso cuando se mueve por terrenos no tan underground.

Con el tiempo, ambos músicos alternarían la ejecución musical con el involucramiento en proyectos ajenos. Productor le gusta llamarse a Brian Eno, Ingeniero de Sonido le gusta llamarse a Steve Albini. Brian Eno, como músico/productor a sido un renovador de la textura y el discurso en el rock, dotándolo de artificio y sensualidad plástica en los primeros ROXY MUSIC , pioneros del Glam; llevando a DAVID BOWIE hacia un sonido frío, galáctico y “filosófico” en su etapa más vanguardista en Berlín; y como productor, haciendo que la saltarína escena New Wave neoyorquina asumiera líneas de fuga experimentales en el “Remain in Light” de TALKING HEADS, una de las joyas de los ochenta, así como en la compilación No New York, matriz de lo que se conocería como la “No Wave”. Sus producciones no son vastas pero casi todas hitos rompedores en la historia de la música popular.

Por su parte, Steve Albini representa, para muchos, la “honestidad”, el apego al canon del rock, a la autenticidad y la lucha feroz contra “la dominación tecnológica”. Desde el punk como bandera, su formula como “Ingeniero” es la de “no figurar”; respetar a cada grupo en su sonido, intentando que suenen “lo mas fieles a si mismos”, sin adornos. Las bandas con las que ha colaborado son miles, como buen obrero, y de todos los rincones del mundo, muchas de ellas no figuraran en los libros de historia del rock como la española LA HABITACIÓN ROJA, pero otras han sido básicamente los bombazos que han marcado el rock de finales de los ochenta hasta la fecha, el ha sido “productor”…. perdón Don Albini: “Ingeniero” del “Surfer Rosa” de PIXIES, el “Rid of Me” de PJ HARVEY o el inmenso single “My Father, My King” de MOGWAI. Puro trallazo visceral sin concesiones.

En cuanto a la manera en como se asume el trabajo en el estudio, el magnifico crítico Simon Reynolds dice sobre Brian Eno que este funciona a partir de la triada “timbre/textura/cromatismo” con la intención de crear, para cada canción, un “espacio psico-acústico ficcional”. Eno, de esta manera, desprecia hacer “el documento de una banda de rock” sino que su intención es crear un paisaje sonoro a partir de bases conceptuales. Es decir, que su visión de la música es visual (nunca mejor dicho). Se cuenta que Eno, antes de asumirse como el artífice de la renovación sonora de U2 durante los noventas le advirtió a Bono, palabras más palabras menos: la música me importa un pepino, estoy más interesado “en pintar cuadros”.

En su faceta como productor, para Eno el estudio lo es todo, hay que resaltar y llevar sus potencialidades más allá de todo límite. Expandir el sonido, magnificarlo, hacerlo que vuele, crear atmósferas, hacer uso de efectos. Conseguir que los sonidos nos hagan imaginar cosas. El grupo que toca frente a Brian Eno es importante, pero su mente prodigiosa de productor tiene mejores planes para ellos… El productor es Dios Creador.

Julián Ruiz, critico y productor español más bien mediocre y en la línea de los 40 principales, con típico prejuicio rockero ante la palabra “Arte” pretende “ofender” a Brian Eno llamándolo ¡Intelectual!, no le perdona que, en su opinión, desprecie el trabajo artesanal asumiendose como “Artista Total” antes que como “Músico”. El cuenta que en una entrevista con Bryan Ferry ex vocalista de Roxy Music este se refirió al genio del ambient como un “pendejo engreído” que ve a la música como mero “entretenimiento” (y fuente de dinero, of course). Es por todos conocido que Brian Eno posee (casi) todos los derechos de Roxy Music y por lo tanto en la reuniones de Phil Manzanera y compañía su repertorio es bastante limitado. Tendría que regresar Eno a la alineación cosa que le parece tan humillante como trabajar de cargador en un mercado de abastos. Se siente mejor trabajando para Microsoft en el desarrollo de la sonoridad del ambiente windows ($$$).

Brian Eno prefiere las texturas sonoras a manera de colores en una paleta con los cuales pintar ambientes acústicos en menosprecio de los riffs y las secciones rítmicas; para conseguir esta prevalencia del “cromatismo” en la música se vale de una infinidad de “trucos” de estudio. Steve Albini, es otra historia. Se ha ganado una merecida fama entre la fauna rockera por su forma de grabar los riffs de guitarra y la sección rítmica de la batería, sobretodo. En la wikipedia dedicada al Surfer Rosa de Pixies se asegura que utilizó metodos “experimentales” para grabar las baterías. Esto no es tan cierto. En todo caso, su método podría describirse como “hiperrealista”.

Para Steve Albini, un estudio muchas veces “falsea” el sonido del grupo de rock y para buscar el efecto “de realidad” suele recurrir a “ocurrencias” para hacer que el grupo parezca más fidedigno: graba a las bandas “en vivo” y no instrumento por instrumento, coloca micrófonos en todo el espacio de grabación para rescatar el eco “real” o “natural” de los lugares, graba las baterías en el cuarto de baño para que suenen “de verdad”; incluso, en algunas ocasiones no quita de la grabación algunas de las conversaciones que tiene con los músicos, como el famoso “You fuckin Die!” entre el y Frank Black de Pixies incluido en la canción “Vamos”.

El método de Albini es el tan odiado por Brian Eno “método documental”. El de Chicago se subordina ante la propuesta de la banda y lo que pretende es ayudar a que estos suenen como si estuviesen tocando en vivo. Su papel como ingeniero es el de “desaparecer” de la grabación final, haciendo solamente de apoyo para que el grupo desarrolle su “propio potencial”; se dice que el afirma que si un grupo es bueno sonará bien, y punto. Para Albini, es un insulto al músico que el productor tome el mando del grupo durante la grabación cuando su trabajo debería consistir solamente en resolver problemas. Se comenta que cuando cobra lo hace en función de si los miembros de la banda le parecen simpáticos o si “rockean” o no. Suele no cobrar o cobrar poco si el grupo le parece apasionante.

Su filosofía respecto el rock es tan inquebrantable que en la carátula del CD de “Songs about fucking” de Big Black, afirma: “El futuro pertenece a los leales a lo análogo. ¡A chingar a su madre con lo digital!”. Es como si reconociera cierta naturaleza “pura” en el ruido sin artificios, en la falta de pulimentos. Albini ve en el ruido el último escalón de una naturaleza perdida, el remanente de esos sonidos ahora civilizados que sirven para relajarse en los centros comerciales o aeropuertos. Está claro que Brian Eno es su perfecto opuesto en tanto creador de joyas ambient del tipo “Music for Airports”, antecedente del intrascendente y etéreo chill out.

Para Joe Carducci, el rock, como música “pesada” remite a valores “viriles” relacionados con el trabajo: Industria pesada, maquinaría pesada, cero refinamientos. Brian Eno trabaja en la acera de enfrente del rock. Es un detallista cerebral que busca la armonía de un conjunto antes que la “sinceridad” de una pasión bruta y destructiva. En el esquema tradicionalista del rock Brian Eno sería un “afeminado”.

Albini intenta, como ingeniero, tener el rol imposible de desaparecer y dejar solo el ruido de los grupos en estado bruto, extraña paradoja ya que los discos que produce son precisamente recordados por tener “el sello Albini”. En cierta medida, Steve, es un conservador, su lucha es por que nada se entrometa (la tecnología, el ingeniero, la razón, el capital) entre el escucha y el ruido “al natural”. Pero, la música como cualquier otra forma de cultura es todo, menos natural, todo menos ingenua. El hace “artificiosamente” que los grupos suenen “naturales”. El quisiera, seguramente de forma honesta pero “naive” que la música no estuviese inserta dentro del mercado, lo cual es contradictorio con el hecho de que el mismo ha sido “el centro del mercado” y si no ¿Por que aceptaría hacer el “In Utero”, disco póstumo de NIRVANA, probablemente el último gran negocio de la MTV y del rock?

Curiosamente, en el mismo año de 1993, y cada uno por su cuenta obviamente, produjeron dos discos bastante exitosos y representativos, cada uno a su manera, del sonido de la década de los noventa. Brian Eno el “Zooropa” de U2 y Steve Albini el “In Utero” de Nirvana. Podría haber elegido trabajos más oscuros y snobs, pero no hace falta, estos álbumes, además de ejemplares son bastante elocuentes. Aquí van dos tracks, uno de cada uno. El sinuoso y artificial “Lemon” de U2 versus el austero y visceral “Heart Shape Box” de Nirvana. Cada canción es una joya en la producción pero además dos formas distintas de entender “el artesanado” del rock así como dos esquemas éticos, filosóficos y políticos opuestos ¿Hay experiencias de armonización entre estas perspectivas divergentes en la historia del rock? Yo creo que si, pero de eso hablaremos en otra ocasión, ahora, mánchense las manos: ¿Eno o Albini?
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: seite3ch

Wer Brian Peter George St. John le Baptiste de la Salle Eno heisst, wird entweder König von England oder halt eben Produzentenguru. Geboren am 15. Mai 1948 besuchte Eno das St. Joseph’s College, die Ipswich Art School und die Winchester School of Art, die er 1969 abschloss. In der Kunstschule begann er Kassettengeräte als Musikinstrumente zu benutzen und spielte zum ersten Mal in Bands.

Eno begann seine Karriere 1971 als Mitbegründer von Roxy Music, für die der selbsternannte „Nicht-Musiker“ Keyboards und Synthesizer spielte. Besonders auffällig war sein an den Glam-Rock-Chic angelehntes Outfit mit Federboas, Plateauschuhen und Glitzertüchern, die er mit exaltierten Bewegungen auf der Bühne kombinierte.

Enos Soloalben von 1973 bis 1977 „Here Come the Warm Jets“, „Taking Tiger Mountain“, „Another Green World“ und „Before and after Science“ zeigen ihn als experimentierfreudigen und innovativen Popmusiker, der fast keine Grenzen außerhalb seiner jungenhaften Stimme kennt.

Zusammen mit Robert Fripp entwickelte er 1972 eine als „Frippertronics“ bezeichnete Methode zur Klangerzeugung, welche die Tonband-Experimente von Terry Riley modifiziert. Das Duo veröffentlichte die Alben „No Pussyfooting“ (1973) und „Evening Star“ (1975). Gleich nach dem zweiten Album „For Your Pleasure“ 1973 stieg er bei Roxy Music wieder aus und nahm eine Reihe von eigenen Alben auf, die zunächst vom Glam Rock, dann jedoch immer mehr ambient-geprägt waren. Mit seiner Veröffentlichung „Ambient 1: Music for Airports“ (1978) hat er den Musikstil „Ambient“ getauft und geprägt. Diesen Stil führt er bis heute fort.

Er arbeitete als Musiker und Produzent mit verschiedenen anderen Künstlern. So ist er auf der Berlin-Trilogie „Low“ (1977), „Heroes“ (1977) und „Lodger“ (1979) von David Bowie zu hören. 1978 produzierte er Devos „Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo“ und die legendäre Kompilation der New-Yorker No-Wave-Szene, No New York. Er produzierte auch drei Alben der Talking Heads mit „Remain in Light“ (1980) als Höhepunkt. Sein Album mit David Byrne mit dem Titel „My Life in the Bush of Ghosts“ von 1981 ist eines der ersten Nicht-Rap-/Hip-Hop-Alben, das extensives Sampling enthält.

1984 produzierte er U2s „The Unforgettable Fire“ und arbeitete später noch weiter für die Band als Produzent auf „The Joshua Tree“ (1987), „Achtung Baby“ (1991), «Zooropa» (1993) und „All That You Can’t Leave Behind“ (2000), so wie „No Line on the Horizon“ (2009).

In den 90er Jahren produzierte Eno so unterschiedliche Künstler wie den Real-World-Künstler Geoffrey Oryema bis zur Band James, ebenso die Sängerin Jane Siberry und die Performance-Künstlerin Laurie Anderson, mit der er auch die Ausstellung „Self Storage“ (1995) gestaltete. 1994/1995 arbeitete Eno wieder mit David Bowie an dessen Album „Outside“. Seit dieser Zeit ist Eno auch „Visiting Professor“ am Londoner Royal College of Art.

1994 wurde Eno von Entwicklern des Microsoft Chicago-Projekts gebeten, die Startmelodie für Windows 95 zu komponieren. Dies geschah dann ironischerweise auf seinem Mac. Brian Eno gründete Anfang 2004 gemeinsam mit Peter Gabriel die Magnificent Union of Digitally Downloading Artists (Mudda).

Brian Eno ist auch der Co-Produzent des 2006 erschienenen Albums „Surprise“ von Paul Simon. Im gleichen Jahr veröffentlichte Brian Eno die DVD „77 Million Paintings“ mit einem generativen Computerprogramm. Er nutzt den Computer, um – basierend auf realen Gemälden – 77 Millionen visuelle Darstellungen als „Originale“ mittels Überblendungen zu generieren und kombiniert diese mit ebenfalls aus Sound-Layern generierter Musik. Ebenfalls 2006 begann er seine Arbeit am vierten Album „Viva la Vida or Death and All His Friends“ der Band Coldplay, ass im Frühjahr 2008 erschien und von Eno produziert wurde. U2 meldeten Anfang Juni 2007 auf ihrer offiziellen Website, dass sich Eno zusammen mit Daniel Lanois zur Aufnahme eines neuen U2-Albums im Studio in Marokko eingefunden habe. Das aus dieser Zusammenarbeit entstandene Album „No Line on the Horizon“ wurde im Februar 2009 veröffentlicht. Im Mai und 2009 gestaltete er das zweite «Sound and Light Festival» in dessen Rahmen u.a. das Sydney Opera House angestrahlt wurde. 2009 lieferte er den Soundtrack zu Peter Jacksons Film „The Lovely Bones“.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: epochtimesru

Брайан Ино – английский музыкант-экспериментатор, композитор, теоретик, новатор, изобретатель звуков и программы «77 Million Paintings», признан «отцом» эмбиентной и генеративной музыки, саунд-продюсер, мультимедийный артист – пятнадцатый гений из списка «Сто гениев современности».

Брайан Ино произнес гениальные по своей простоте слова: «Не нужно впечатлять себя, нужно меняться». Он ясно понял, что значит «быть творцом», понял, глубоко войдя в загадочный мир искусства, сумев из его недр взглянуть на внешний, окружающий мир.

В одной из немногих опубликованных бесед с Брайаном Ино, гениальный музыкант рассказывает о принципах настоящего творчества, выделяя из них три главных.

Во-первых, нужно быть полностью уверенным, что то, чем ты занимаешься – правильно, и упорно доводить свое дело до конца.

Во-вторых, не надо стремиться быть кем-то, кто, например, пишет музыку лучше, чем ты. Не надо стремиться подражать знаменитостям.

В-третьих, недостаточно только лишь «соображать в музыке», что приведет к вредному чувству – бахвальству. Нужно постоянно меняться, не гордясь своим талантом, а удивляясь ему: «Кто этот человек, который создал такое?», вместо: «Какой я талантливый!»

Родившись в английском городе Вудбридже, недалеко от американской базы ВВС, вместо отторжения или вынужденного привыкания к самолетному гулу, мальчик был им очарован, для него невыносимый самолетный шум стал «марсианской музыкой».

Брайан Ино начал свои эксперименты со звуком и инсталляциями в 60-е годы, окончив Винчестерскую школу искусств. Там он, изучая теорию живописи и музыки, особенно интересуясь концептуализмом, осваивает свой первый музыкальный инструмент – многоканальный записывающий магнитофон. В возрасте двадцати лет, в 1968 году, Ино издает свою первую книгу – теоретический справочник “Музыка для не музыкантов”.

Брайан Ино до сих пор принципиально называет себя «не музыкантом», но влиятельней его в музыкальном мире, пожалуй, никого не найдешь.

Свой первый самостоятельный альбом Ино выпускает в январе 1974 года, где он экспериментирует с музыкой, как многостаночник: необычный вокал с загадочными текстами, играет на гитаре, клавишах, синтезаторе. Кроме того он сам продюсирует материал, в результате, выпущенная пластинка “Here Come the Warm Jets” становится топовой в Британии. После первого альбома Ино запишет 24 альбома самостоятельно и 19 совместных пластинок с многочисленными звездами эстрады. Одна из самых удачных пластинок сделана в Москве в конце 80-х для экспериментальной группы «Звуки Му».

Брайан Ино как продюсер приобретает большой авторитет в середине 70-х, получает дважды премию «Brit Award» – лучший продюсер года. И не случайно: Брайан Ино ценит индивидуальность, видит гениальных людей и оказывает им поддержку – в том, чтобы отстоять свой неповторимый голос в огромном мире искусства.

«Отцом» эмбиентной (окружающей или «мебельной») музыки Ино становится после автокатастрофы, лежа в больничной палате, прикованный к пастели, часами слушая звуки улицы, шум дождя и грозы, вспоминая гул самолетов из детства. Оказывается, внешний звуковой поток незаметно влияет на человека, естественно проникая в него, как в часть единого мироздания. В таком звуковом потоке, который растворен в воздухе, нет композиции, он – и музыка, и свет, и цвет одновременно, в совершенстве гармонирует с внешней средой. Выздоровев, Ино записывает пластинку “Another Green World” (1975), где песенная форма полностью выпущена из своих рамок, мелодия свободна, ничем не ограничена. Появился новый жанр – звуковая живопись, которая с развитием видео превратится в видеоклипы всевозможных вариаций.

Брайан Ино полностью погружается в эмбиентный стиль, основав собственный лейбл Obscure Records, где публикует “десятитомную” серию своих экспериментов. С альбомом “Music for Airports” (1978) композитор входит в область психотерапии. Он сочиняет эмбиентные мелодии, помогающие авиапассажирам преодолеть страх перед полетом и перед возможной катастрофой.

Программа «77 Million Paintings» («77 миллионов картин») была создана Ино в 2006 году. Работая над программой, Брайан решил расширить возможности телевидения «живыми картинками», которые может сотворить сам зритель, гарантируя уникальность изображения и неповторимость одновременного звучания.
Выставка на основе программы «77 миллионов картин» успешно прошла в том же 2006 году в Италии, Великобритании, Японии, Южноафриканской Республике, в 2007 году – в США.

Брайан Ино принес человечеству еще одну пользу, создав вместе с Питером Шмидтом карты, так называемые «Обходные стратегии», помогающие пользователям решать всевозможные жизненные дилеммы.

Кто помнит мелодию-вставку к запуску Windows 95? Ее создатель тот же гениальный Брайан Ино. В интервью газете The San Francisco Chronicle Ино коротко и образно поведал историю создания мелодии: “Знаешь, нам нужна музыкальная пьеса такая… Универсальная, ну такая… Оптимистичная, фантастическая, сентиментальная, эмоциональная. – они выдали мне список всевозможных эпитетов, а в конце списка говорилось, что по времени пьеса должна длиться всего три с четвертью секунды!”
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: luovafactory

영국 음악가 브라이언 이노(Brian Eno)는 ‘사운드의 혁신가’로 불린다. 멜로디, 화음보다 음향 자체의 질감과 색조에 주목한 앰비언트 뮤직의 창시자 중 하나이자, U2와 콜드플레이의 메가히트 앨범들을 프로듀스한, 대중음악계의 큰 손이다. 윈도우즈95 시작 음악도 만들었다.