CALEB CHARLAND

КАЛЕБ ЧАРЛАНД

apple trees and LED

CALEB CHARLAND 2

source: designyoutrust

Growing up in rural Maine, Caleb Charland spend much of his childhood helping his father remodel their family homes. These experiences instilled an awareness of the potential for the creative use of materials, and the ability to fabricate his visions.
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source: thisiscolossal

Portland, Maine-based photographer Caleb Charland frequently merges art and science with his photographic experiments involving electricity, fire, and magnetism. One of his ongoing projects involves a series of alternative power sources created using fruit, coins, and even vinegar to power the lights in his long exposure photographs. The apple photograph above involved a nearly 11-hour setup as he carefully hammered 300 zinc-coated galvanized nails into apples (zinc reacts with acid in the apples creating electricity, science!) and used copper wiring to transfer the current to a standard living room lamp. Even then, the light was so dim it required a 4-hour exposure during which Charland fended off ravenous deer through the night with an impromptu shaker made from a tin can and wire nuts. You can read much more about the ordeal over on Discover, and here’s a video of the entire project coming together.
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source: calebcharland

The English scientist Michael Faraday, whose experiments with electricity and magnetism allowed for the practical use of theses forces in the modern world, once said “All this is a dream. Still examine it by a few experiments. Nothing is too wonderful to be true, if it be consistent with the laws of nature; and in such things as these experiment is the best test of such consistency.” To understand the world and to profit from it one must interact with it, one must experiment. My practice as an artist combines a scientific curiosity with a constructive approach to making pictures. I utilize everyday objects and fundamental forces to illustrate experiences of wonder. For me, wonder is a state of mind somewhere between knowledge and uncertainty. An energy vibrates in that space between our perceptions of the world and the potential the mind senses for our interventions within the world.
My current body of work, Back to Light, expands upon a classic grade school science project, the potato battery. By inserting a galvanized nail into one side of a potato and a copper wire in the other side a small electrical current is generated. The zinc coating on the nail gives off electrons due to the electrolyte environment within the potato. These electrons then travel along the copper wire and illuminate a small light emitting diode. The utter simplicity of this electrical phenomenon is endlessly fascinating for me. Many people have had the experience of drawing power from fruit in the classroom, and it never cease to bring a smile to the face or a thought to the mind. This work speaks to a common curiosity we all have for how the world works as well as a global concern for the future of earth’s energy sources.
Over the past two years I have refined my process attempting organic battery installations on a variety of scales. In the studio sufficient power can be drawn from a dozen or so pieces of fruit, while out in the apple orchard, or in the potato field, 300 to 500 pieces are required to power thirty LEDs attached to the inside of a lampshade. The FotoVisura Grant would fund further research into alternative energy sources and expand the potential of this project. The next phase of this series will involve building my own dynamos for electrical production. Dynamos are found in electrical motors and hydro-electric wheel houses and consist of magnets spinning within a coil of copper wire to create electric current. This grant would allow for the construction of small temporary hydroelectric generators in rivers, streams, and waterfalls. The energy harvested will illuminate the landscape before the camera.
Since all this is a dream my hope is that these photographs function as micro utopias by suggesting and illustrating the endless possibilities of alternative and sustainable energy production. The cycle that begins with the light of our closest star implanting organic materials with nutrients and energy, is re-routed in these images, Back to Light, illuminating earth once again.
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source: calebcharland

Artist’s Statement

“The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed.” -Albert Einstein

The way we understand the world relies so much on our ability to measure it. Given that many measurements are based on the proportions of the human body it’s clear we measure stuff to find our place amongst it all and to connect with it in some way. By exploring the world at hand, from the basement to the backyard, I have found a resonance in things. An energy vibrates in that space between our perceptions of the world and the potential the mind senses for our interventions within the world. This energy is the source of all true art and science, it breeds those beloved “Ah Ha!” moments and it allows us to sense the extraordinary in the common.

For me, wonder is a state of mind somewhere between knowledge and uncertainty. It is the basis of my practice and results in images that are simultaneously familiar yet strange. Each piece begins as a question of visual possibilities and develops in tandem with the natural laws of the world. Serendipitously, this process often yields unexpected results measurable only through photographic processes. The human presence and artifacts of the process provide a clue to the creation of the photograph while adding to the mysterious nature of the image. My hope is that this work affirms that even within the well tested laws of science there are, and must always be, pathways to reinterpretation and discovery.

(All images are created in-camera, on a flatbed scanner, or in the darkroom. No content is created or added digitally)

BioGraphs

These pictures began by accident. I was curious to see what would happen if I allowed bacteria to grow on the surface of film. I was interested in relinquishing the control of image making to a natural process. My original thought was to remove the silver from film to make images of bacterial growth. By chance and by luck, I was not entirely successful; some slight traces of silver particles remained on a few pieces of film. As I proceeded with the experiment I was amazed to see what the bacteria were doing. The bacterial growth patterns were re-depositing the image particles, revealing a life cycle traced in silver. I could not ignore such unexpected and fascinating results. What began as a photograph had become a biograph, a trace of life, an index of an existence. I had witnessed something strange and unknown to me; I needed to look further into this phenomenon.

To refine the accident I exerted a slight degree of control over the process. I created solid fields of tone or color on pieces of film, which were then treated like Petri dishes. I coated the film with a substance called Agar, a nutrient source and a base on which the bacteria could grow. In time the bacteria would eat through the Agar and proceed to consume the gelatin emulsion of the film. Once the emulsion was compromised the image particles were set adrift and repositioned by the growth cycle of the bacteria.

The system I had established provided the bacteria with a limited amount of nutrients, the Agar and the gelatin. Once the bacteria had grown and spread across the film it would inevitably consume all available resources and cease to grow. The system would shut down as indicated by no further changes in the patterning. At this point I scanned the film as evidence of the life cycle.

The resulting growth patterns are nebulous, not dissimilar to patterns on a beach at low tide or aerial images of tundra, both of which are traces of natural processes. These landscapes evolved on a dark shelf in my apartment, but they take us to worlds we thought we might have seen through Hubble’s lens, on a trip to the coast, or after the floods recede. They are little worlds, life-scapes on sheets of photographic film.

Back to Light

The English scientist Michael Faraday, whose experiments with electricity and magnetism allowed for the practical use of theses forces in the modern world, once said “All this is a dream. Still examine it by a few experiments. Nothing is too wonderful to be true, if it be consistent with the laws of nature; and in such things as these experiment is the best test of such consistency.” To understand the world and to profit from it one must interact with it, one must experiment. My practice as an artist combines a scientific curiosity with a constructive approach to making pictures. I utilize everyday objects and fundamental forces to illustrate experiences of wonder. For me, wonder is a state of mind somewhere between knowledge and uncertainty. An energy vibrates in that space between our perceptions of the world and the potential the mind senses for our interventions within the world.

My current body of work, Back to Light, expands upon a classic grade school science project, the potato battery. By inserting a galvanized nail into one side of a potato and a copper wire in the other side a small electrical current is generated. The utter simplicity of this electrical phenomenon is endlessly fascinating for me. Many people have had the experience of drawing power from fruit in the classroom, and it never ceases to bring a smile to the face or a thought to the mind. This work speaks to a common curiosity we all have for how the world works as well as a global concern for the future of earth’s energy sources.

Since all this is a dream my hope is that these photographs function as micro utopias by suggesting and illustrating the endless possibilities of alternative and sustainable energy production. The cycle that begins with the light of our closest star implanting organic materials with nutrients and energy, is re-routed in these images, Back to Light, illuminating earth once again.
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source: zupi

A fotografia de Caleb Charland sempre girou em torno de curiosidades e experimentos científicos. Quem viu o post que fizemos em 2010 deve se lembrar de suas imagens intrigantes.

O artista continua a expandir os limites de suas investigações, e mais recentemente esteve envolvido com imagens que exploram fontes alternativas de energia elétrica. Usando o suco de frutas cítricas para iluminar lâmpadas, Charland concebe fotografias que fascinam tanto pelo visual como pela ideia que veiculam.
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source: boumbang

Caleb Charland est un jeune photographe qui a grandi dans le Maine, aux Etats-Unis, où il a passé une bonne partie de son enfance à aider son père à réaménager leur maison familiale. C’est en grande partie ainsi que sont nées sa créativité et sa puissance d’imagination.

Le travail de Caleb Charland se distingue par un goût prononcé pour les sciences physiques et l’observation. Ses photographies montrent, en effet, des vues astronomiques, des reproductions de systèmes solaires ou encore des scènes où l’artiste s’interroge sur l’utilisation de la lumière et de la matière. Chaque fois, ce qui prévaut, c’est un intérêt prononcé pour l’expérience. Il s’agit de voir, et de donner à voir. Pour ce faire, l’artiste n’a de cesse de monter des expériences scientifiques, comme pour provoquer la réalité. L’idée, par exemple, de laisser germer des bactéries sur la surface d’un film plastique est exemplaire du travail artistique que mène à bien Caleb Charland depuis maintenant plusieurs années, où l’observation et l’expérience scientifique ont partie liée avec la recherche esthétique.

La photographie se transforme alors en quelque chose d’autre que le simple témoignage d’un instant ou d’un moment figé. C’est également une preuve de vie. Par son travail l’artiste nous rappelle ce que nous avions peut-être oublié, à savoir, qu’en dehors de l’homme, la nature et l’univers se meuvent en suivant des lois et des principes physiques définis.

Le beau dérive alors aussi bien de l’infiniment petit que de l’infiniment grand et fait prendre conscience au spectateur de ce que sont les systèmes, les découvertes et les inventions. Les différentes séries de photos de Caleb Charland recréent, en fin de compte, un lien entre les arts et les sciences. Cette tâche apparait d’actualité, au moment où les avancées scientifiques paraissent se produire sans les citoyens, où les nouvelles technologies concernent tout le monde mais où personne n’est capable d’en expliquer le fonctionnement. Le travail de l’artiste, en ce sens, présente l’intérêt majeur de faire pénétrer le spectateur dans l’intimité d’une démarche scientifique qui s’expose et s’exhibe sous l’objectif photographique. Il ne s’agit pas d’un travail de vulgarisation. Ce serait le cas si nos sociétés, à l’écoute des chercheurs, se laissaient conter les savoirs scientifiques par véritable intérêt coginitif. Nos sociétés, hélas, ne sont à l’écoute ni des chercheurs ni de la science et ne fondent leurs opinions que sur l’efficacité a posteriori des objets qui lui sont présentés. L’art serait donc l’unique moyen de faire rentrer de nouveau la science dans le foyer de nos préoccupations contemporaines, et les photos de Caleb Charland l’exemple de ce que pourrait être la naissance d’une curiosité scientifique chez le spectateur, grâce à une certaine émotion artistique.

Dans une conférence prononcée sur l’exploration robotique de l’univers il y a peu à la Fondation Juan March à Madrid, le chercheur Héctor Guerrero Padrón concluait en rappelant que tout scientifique avait une responsabilité envers la société: celle de vulgariser ses travaux afin de la tenir au courant des avancées de l’humanité. Caleb Charland ne semble ainsi pas faire autre chose ici que de faire prendre conscience à l’humanité de ses propres progrès.
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source: blogfeitobrasil

O fotógrafo Caleb Charland frequentemente une arte e ciência em seus experimentos. Em seu projeto mais recente, o artista envolve uma série de fontes de energia alternativa utilizando moedas, vinagre e até mesmo frutas, como na fotografia abaixo, em que Caleb fincou pregos em cerca 300 maçãs, resultando em uma pequena corrente elétrica capaz de acender uma lâmpada.
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source: telegrama

Caleb Charland creció en el área rural de Maine dedicándose durante su infancia a reparar junto a su padre la casa donde vivía. El sentimiento de vastedad que da el campo y por ende la soledad que conlleva son impresas en la fotografía de este hombre talentoso.
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source: wowlavie

核電的潛在危機,近幾年來,伴隨國際許多天災人禍的怵目驚心才漸漸喚起國人的重視,更引起四面八方的反核聲浪,其實不只是核能,就連風力、火力等自然能源都在轉換電能過程中製造出許多汙染傷害,有些自然電能甚至更甚於核電造成的廢料。面對如此窘境,人們該做的不是盲目阻止,而是有效解決,更不要讓我們息息相關的生活淪為無知的口號。由波蘭攝影師Caleb Charland所發起的《Back to Light》是一系列藝術與科學結合的實驗性概念攝影作品,主要在探討藉由日常生活裡的「自然」產物進行通電,Caleb Charland利用周遭簡易的食材自行組裝設計產生電流,在無汙染無害的情況下讓燈泡照亮生活,並將之化為攝影作品。早在這之前,攝影師就已實驗過在蘋果園內連接300顆蘋果成功點亮一盞檯燈,如今《Back to Light》系列更將材料清單擴大至橘子、檸檬、葡萄柚等各式水果,就連馬鈴薯、白醋、硬幣…也都能成為電力來源。
《Back to Light》給人超現實藝術的美感、又讓人感受科學家們的瘋狂,藉由實驗物的幾何構圖與微微光感讓人彷彿來到另一個迷幻時空,而原來藝術與科學的邂逅竟是如此完美。這一系列行進中的攝影活動其實在2010年就已開始,而攝影師最初靈感來自於簡單的馬鈴薯電池裝置,雖然這些食物電池並無法帶來持續而強大的供電能力,但Caleb Charland期待透過這些長時間曝光的實驗性攝影作品,讓大眾抱持對世界源源不絕的好奇心,同時為全球勢在必行的開發替代能源及可持續能源議題提供一個無限可能的希望,或許台灣對於能源也能在此得到不一樣的靈感!目前Caleb Charland的攝影作品正在芝加哥的 Schneider Gallery藝廊展出,同時也預計於5月17日至6月7日在美國波士頓Kayafas畫廊舉辦個展,有興趣的朋友們可現場親身感受一下其科學實驗的藝術魅力。
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source: sciforblabla

Фотограф Калеб Черланд (Caleb Charland) создал необычную исследовательскую фотосерию под названием «Назад к свету» (Back To Light), в которой исследует возможность вырабатывания электроэнергии из обычных предметов.

Проект «Назад к свету» (Back To Light) начался почти три года тому назад. Когда Калеб Черланд (Caleb Charland) создал первую оригинальную версию аккумулятора из трех сотен яблок. Вдохновленный разработкой, фотограф-исследователь создал уже известный многим аккумулятор из обычной картофелины. А дальше все пошло как «по маслу»: апельсины, грейпфруты, лимоны, монетки, уксус и прочее. В будущем Калеб планирует создать гидроэлектростанцию и другие необычные проекты.
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source: mahhjouba

بسم الله الرحمان الرحيمقد أنشأت هذه البطارية البرتقال من قبل المصور الفوتوغرافي ” كالب شارلاند Caleb Charland ” كجزء من تجاربه من أجل خلق طاقة بديلة باستخدام الفاكهة والخضروات، وغيرها من الأشياء للحصول على الضوء. البطارية الاستثنائية تم تجميعها من الفاكهة ، والأسلاك والمسامير وإضاءة الصمام.إضاءة LED و هي إضاءة تنبعث من الصمام الثنائي
” الصمام الثنائي الباعث للضوء ” .المصور الفوتوغرافي و الفنان الأمريكي ” كالب شارلاند Caleb Charland ” مشهور جدا بمشاريعه والتجارب مع الضوء والظلال .” كالب شارلاند Caleb Charland “استولى على انتباه الجميع مع فريقه الجديد والتصوير الفوتوغرافي في مشروعه ، والذي يستخدم
فيه العملات المعدنية والفواكه لإنتاج الإضاءة . بمساعدة شرائح البرتقال ، أسلاك النحاس و المسامير المجلفنة وإضاءة الصمام، تمكن” كالب شارلاند Caleb Charland ” لخلق بطارية حقيقية وظيفية .السر هو في حامض الستريك .
المسامير تتفاعل مع الأحماض والنحاس الأسلاك فتولد الطاقة عن طريق الضوء .
بحيث كل شريحة برتقال مخوزقة بمسمار الزنك،التي تنتج تفاعل كيميائي بينها وبين حمض الستريك.

“كالب Caleb”يبقي مصراع الكاميرا مفتوحا لأكثر من 10 ساعة لتقديم هذه الصور .
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source: azaramara

Induljunk a címben olvasható találós kérdéssel: mit gondolnak, mennyi alma kell egy olvasólámpa fénybe borításához? A választ egy portlandi fotóművész, Caleb Charland adta meg – összesen körülbelül háromszáz. A válaszért Charland saját bevallása szerint mintegy 11 órán keresztül döfködött cink és réz rudakat az almákba, vezetékelt és kötött össze drótokat. Majd miután sikerült almával termelt áramot vezetnie az olvasólámpába, egy négy órás expozíció során örökítette meg az eredményt.

Manapság egyre többen gondolják újra a megújuló energiaforrások kiaknázásának lehetőségét. A szakemberek furcsa erőművekben, a művészek pedig Charlandhoz hasonlóan különleges kompozíciókban gondolkodnak. Az eredmények mindkét esetben magukért beszélnek. Vicces műszaki megoldások közül párral blogunk is foglalkozott, például itt.

De most térjünk vissza a gyümölcs-zöldség áramforrásokhoz. Mai bejegyzésünkben a mindent a szemnek elvet előtérbe helyezve nézhetik meg az általunk legérdekesebbnek talált, gyümölcsből termelt villamos energián alapuló művészeti alkotásokat.

És hogy mitől világítanak az égők? Mert amit a gyümölcsből, a cink és rézdarabból Charland csinált az nem más, mint egy Volta-féle galvánelem.
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source: creativemove

ว่ากันว่าความเป็นศิลปะคือขั้วตรงข้ามของคำว่าวิทยาศาสตร์ เนื่องจากหลายๆ ครั้งที่สุนทรียะก็เกิดขึ้นอย่างไม่มีเหตุผล แต่เมื่อได้มาเห็นผลงานของศิลปิน Caleb Charland เราก็ได้แต่ตั้งคำถามว่าจริงๆ แล้วมันจำเป็นด้วยหรือที่สองสิ่งนี้ต้องอยู่ตรงข้ามกันเสมอไป แล้วถ้าเป็นแบบนั้น เขาผู้นี้จะไปยืนอยู่ตรงไหน?

Caleb Charland เคยเป็นเพียงศิลปินช่างภาพธรรมดาๆ คนหนึ่งในพอร์ตแลนด์ สหรัฐฯ จนเมื่อวันหนึ่งเขาเกิดสนใจในเรื่องพลังงานทางเลือกขึ้นมา ศิลปินผู้นี้จึงหันไปทดลองสร้างพลังงานไฟฟ้าทางเลือกจากวัสดุต่างๆ ที่อยู่รอบตัว ตั้งแต่เหรียญไปจนถึงแอ๊ปเปิ้ล (กรดในแอ๊ปเปิ้ลถูกเปลียนเป็นสารก่อพลังงานไฟฟ้า ด้วยตะปูเคลือบสังกะสีที่เค้าเสียบเข้าไปในผลแอ๊ปเปิ้ล) แล้วศิลปินผู้นี้ก็กลายเป็นนักวิทยาศาสตร์ไปโดยปริยาย

แต่วิทยาศาสตร์ย่อมพิสูจน์ได้ด้วยหลักฐานเชิงประจักษ์ เมื่อคิดว่าแค่ผลิตไฟฟ้าทางเลือกขึ้นแล้วถ่ายรูปเก็บไว้เป็นหลักฐานคงไม่พอเป็นแน่แท้ Caleb จึงนำแหล่งพลังงานที่เขาประดิษฐ์ขึ้นมาเชื่อมต่อกับเครื่องใช้ไฟฟ้าในบ้านให้ดูกันจะจะเสียเลย แม้ว่าแสงที่ได้อาจจะสลัวๆ ไปบ้าง แต่อย่างน้อยก็ยืนยันได้ว่าสิ่งประดิษฐ์ของเขานี้ใช้ได้จริงนะจ๊ะ ไม่ได้หลอกเล่น!

แม้จะดูเหมือนเป็นการทดลองทางวิทยาศาสตร์ แต่ความเป็นศิลปินในตัวของเขาก็ไม่ได้หายไปไหน หลังจากเสร็จสิ้นการทดลองแล้ว Caleb ก็มักจะชักภาพนวัตกรรมของเขาไว้เป็นที่ระลึก ซึ่งภาพที่ได้นอกจากจะดูอาร์ตแล้วยังเซอร์เรียลชวนฝันอย่างบอกไม่ถูก
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source: dobask

Fotograf Caleb Charland rozsvietil LED lampu iba za pomoci obyčajných jabĺk rastúcich na strome. Vytvoriť niečo podobné zamýšľal už dlho, no až poslednú jeseň sa mu to konečne podarilo zrealizovať. Lampu postavil do stredu jablčného sadu jedného z jeho priateľov, ktorý sa nachádza v Newburghu v Maine. V lapme sa nachádza 30 malých LED svetiel a každé svetlo je napájané desiatimi jablkami, ktoré ešte stále rastú v korune jablone.

“Keď som záber fotil, bola nezvyčajne teplá októbrová noc a na oblohe svietil spln. Bol to naozaj krásny pohľad a veľmi príjemná atmosféra. Jediné, na čo som zabudol bolo, že v tom období sa v okolí pohybuje veľa divej zveri. Celú noc bolo z okolia počuť ručanie jeleňov, tak sme noc bezpečne prežili vďaka zapnutému rádiu,” opisuje autor priebeh fotenia jablkovej lampy.