charles pétillon

charles pétillon 7

source: charlespetillon

Ces invasions de ballons sont des métaphores. Elles ont pour but de changer le point de vue sur ce que nous côtoyons chaque jour sans y porter attention. C’est notre regard que j’essaie d’aviver, permettant ainsi de passer d’une perception pratique à une émotion visuelle.

Dans PlayStation, il conviendrait de parler de station de jeux. On évoque ici le développement des aires de jeux dans les communes. Du toboggan en passant par le terrain de foot ou la chambre symbolisée par la console de jeux, on y questionne les usages parfois cathartiques et l’emprise obsessionnelle et quelquefois néfaste de ces jeux sur l’homme.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: designboom

‘invasion’ is a word not often associated with the presence of balloons — we usually regard them as weightless, whimsical orbs hovering in mid-air and unrestrained by physical boundaries. charles pétillon turns this idea on its head, containing bundles of white, inflated balls within architectural spaces, neighborhoods and natural landscapes. the french photographer considers each photo in his series a metaphor for either a period of time, an emotional sensation, or universal urban evolution. they aim to change the point-of-view that we encounter everyday, and move our idea from practical perception to visual recognition.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: collateral

Il fotografo francese Charles Pétillon ha creato una serie dal titolo Invasion, un progetto che ricorda in parte l’idea di The RedBall Project dell’artista Kurt Perschke o le Balloon Sculptures di Hans Hemmert.

Centinai di palloncini bianchi straripano da spazi architettonici, quartieri e paesaggi naturali. Ogni foto diventa una metafora, una sensazione, o un’evoluzione dell’universo urbano. Gli scatti mirano a cambiare la nostra percezione del paesaggio che incontriamo tutti i giorni, trasformano un luogo comune in uno spazio inconsueto e straniante che ci spinge a osservare il quotidiano con occhi diversi.

I palloncini sviluppano un’interazione con lo spazio e con lo spettatore attraverso il gioco e l’ironia. Aprono una porta che ci porta a immaginare con ingenuita.

Con delicatezza poetica ci invitano a chiederci “e se..?”
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: ignantde

French photographer Charles Pétillon created the series ‘Invasion’, containing bundles of white, inflated balls within architectural spaces, neighborhoods and natural landscapes. He considers each photo in his series a metaphor for either a period of time, an emotional sensation, or universal urban evolution. They aim to change our perception of the ordinary sceneries we encounter everyday. The photos will be exhibited at Maison Européene de la Photographie between the 20th of February until the 22th of March 2015.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: dezeen

White balloons spill out the windows and doors of a house, invade a golf course and overflow from a burnt-out car in a series of installations by French artist Charles Pétillon.

In his Invasions series, Paris-based photographer and installation artist Pétillon aims to use balloons to alter the way people perceive familiar things and spaces.

“These balloon invasions are metaphors,” said the artist. “Their goal is to change the way in which we see the things we live alongside each day without really noticing them.”

“It is our way of looking at things that I am trying to transform and revive, and therefore make it possible to go beyond practical perception to aesthetic experience: a visual emotion,” he added.

Pétillon fills spaces from public play areas to buildings with bunches of different-sized white balloons.

To create the effects, Pétillon and his team inflated and tied together the balloons in a warehouse. They were then transported to the chosen locations and hung on aluminium structures.

The installations have been photographed empty of people, with the balloons becoming the ghostly occupants of the spaces.

Pétillon chose white balloons to create a contrast with the locations. “The whiteness straightens the dualism, the contrast and absurdity versus the materials of the location,” he told Dezeen. “The conjunction of balloons’ abstracts shapes and environment’s one, allows me to create improbable, poetical objects.”

In the piece titled Play Station 1, the balloons inhabit a piece of children’s playground equipment, spilling down the slide and ladder, while in Play Station 2, the inflated spheres cluster around the basketball hoop on a court.

For Land Art, the balloons are bunched together on the putting green of a golf course, while a few strays seem to be rolling towards the hole.

At another installation, an indoor swimming pool shaped like a spaceship appears to have been stuffed with white balloons that spill outside.

Meanwhile in Souvenirs de Famille (Family Memories), balloons burst out of the doors and windows of a brick house. “The profound memories of childhood, games and naivety are conjured up in Souvenirs de Famille,” said Pétillon.

Balloons also occupy a garage in CO2 and an abandoned car in Folklore. Pétillon describes them as “metaphors for the excess of the individual in collective daily life, mirroring the scars it has left on the world”.

In Mutations 2, a bunch is suspended between two trees in a forest. Balloons tied into a spherical stand on grass in Igloo 1, while for Mimetisme (Mimicry) they bob on a lake like buoys in a row.