Craig Green

克雷格·格林
크레이그 그린
קרייג גרין
クレイグ・グリーン
Крейг Грин

Craig Green 77

source: itsnicethat

Craig designs menswear that is based on preconceptions of manliness, using harsh fabrics, geometric lines and enormous pieces of splintered wood. The brutal, almost prisoner-like collections are a nod to the pressures men feel to be “handy” or strong. No one’s forcing you to wear a hat that could have been cobbled together in the skip at Homebase, but let’s hope everyone can see past that to the truly brilliant creative craftsmanship beneath. Craig says of British menswear: “It is one of the very few places that is open to suggestion and not scared of change, and this is why it continues to support young talents.”
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source: thisispaper

“The collection took strong inspirations from religion, cults and utilitarian work wear. Strong influences also came from the book The Midwich Cuckoos (1957) and the movie The Village of the Damned (1960). I looked a lot a religious dress and minimalistic constructions and shapes.

Playing with ideas of utility and function, the Trompe l’oeil luggage and large wooden structures have connotations of religious pilgrimage. Inspired by luggage carriers and nomads the huge structures dwarf the models and create abstract, almost menacing silhouettes.

Another strong theme is ideas of light and shadow. Each colour tie-dye outfit has an exact replica outfit in black, which walks behind it as a ‘shadow’. The light and dark idea is also apparent in the placement prints being inspired and realised threw projecting light onto the outfits. The prints are a process where hand bleached fabric is scanned in and engineered precisely onto pattern pieces to create seamless digitally placed and layered prints on the body, giving the illusion of a coloured light projection.”
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source: afflante

Craig Green graduated from the Central Saint Martins MA in February 2012. AW’2012 fashion collection was inspired by a lot of imagery from religion and cults, as well as looking at work wear and uniform from the movie ‘The village of the damned’ (1960). The digital prints are engineered precisely to the pattern pieces to create the illusion of them being light projections on the body. This idea of light and dark is also shown in each colored outfit, having the exact outfit in black walking behind it.