DANIEL ROZIN

丹尼尔·罗津
Даниэль Розин

Angles Mirror

source: vimeopro

The “Angles Mirror” rejects the idea of building a picture based on relative lightness and darkness. Instead, it explores a system of linear rotation that indicates the direction of an object’s contour. A wall-mounted sculpture, the “Angles Mirror” is a sharp triangular block of steel, dotted with yellow indicator arms that pivot. Based on the isometric grid, its structure favors the patterns and angles found in an equilateral triangle. The arms, which do not have the ability to change brightness or luminosity, use input from a camera and reconstruct the view with areas of varying angles. The negative space surrounding a viewer is translated into horizontal lines on the picture plane. Rather than creating a photorealistic image, the three-dimensional movement of a figure is represented, visualizing optical flow as viewer’s proximity to the sculpture changes. A nuanced contour results, as the viewer shifts back and forth, altering how the structure of space is perceived. Similar to “Fan Mirror”, in the “Angles Mirror”, the sequence of movement across the picture plane is directed in part by its audience. When the viewer walks away from the work, or chooses to view the sculpture from a distance, a series of predefined images and transitions cover the object’s surface.
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source: smoothware

Daniel Rozin is an artist, educator and developer, working in the area of interactive digital art. As an interactive artist Rozin creates installations and sculptures that have the unique ability to change and respond to the presence and point of view of the viewer. In many cases the viewer becomes the contents of the piece and in others the viewer is invited to take an active role in the creation of the piece. Even though computers are often used in Rozin’s work, they are seldom visible.

As an educator, Rozin is Associate Art Professor at ITP, Tisch School Of The Arts, NYU where he teaches such classes as: “The World- Pixel by Pixel”, “Project Development Studio” and “Toy Design Workshop”. As developer, Rozin owns Smoothware Design, a software company that creates tools for the interactive art and multimedia authoring community.

Born in Jerusalem and trained as an industrial designer Rozin lives and works in New York. His work has been exhibited widely with solo exhibitions in the US and internationally and featured in publications such as The New York Times, Wired, ID, Spectrum and Leonardo. His work has earned him numerous awards including Prix Ars Electronica, ID Design Review and the Chrysler Design Award.
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source: art-agenda

Since the late 1990s, Rozin’s constructions in software and sculpture have investigated the psychological and optical cues inherent to image building, such as pattern and the materiality of the picture plane. In a departure from the traditional rectilinear grid, which was the foundation of his 2010 exhibit X by Y, Rozin’s new series of work proposes another geometric basis of image creation. Focusing on rotational systems of orientation, Angles celebrates the polar, or angular, notations of pictographic information. Using the triangle and sculptural elements that twist their shape, Rozin’s conversation of the grid highlights a new dimensionality of formal representation.

In Rozin’s work, the picture plane’s transformation is a means to explore animated behavior, representation and illusion. Merging the geometric with the participatory, Rozin’s installations have long been celebrated for their kinetic and interactive properties. Grounded in gestures of the body, three pieces in the exhibit Angles are mirrors of various sorts and respond to the presence of viewers in real time by recreating a visual representation of their likeness.

Fan Mirror is a free-standing sculpture that measures fourteen feet across. Its overall shape and rounded frame suggest the folded oriental hand fan, a decorative object that first emerged in the 10th century and gained popularity during the Ming Dynasty. The sculpture is comprised of seventeen ribbed wooden spokes that support a total of 153 hand fans, in an array of sizes and colors, from Korea, China, Taiwan, Spain and Japan. Crafted from materials ranging from sandalwood and synthetic silk to plastic, each fan is actuated by a motor that is computer-controlled, causing the bands to spread open and rhythmically close. Sweeping patterns roll across Fan Mirror‘s arced surface, blossoming in rings that resemble an onion peel or peacock’s tail. The sequence of movement in this work is directed in part by the viewer’s engagement. When approached at close range, the fans, which are also connected to a camera, move to create a rough silhouette of the viewer within the sculpture. When viewing from a distance, the movement is generated by an algorithm programmed by the artist.

The Angles Mirror rejects the idea of building a picture based on relative lightness and darkness. Instead, it explores a system of linear rotation that indicates the direction of an object’s contour. A wall-mounted sculpture, the Angles Mirror is a sharp triangular block of steel, dotted with yellow indicator arms that pivot. Based on the isometric grid, its structure favors the patterns and angles found in an equilateral triangle. The arms, which do not have the ability to change brightness or luminosity, use input from a camera and reconstruct the view with areas of varying angles. The negative space surrounding a viewer is translated into horizontal lines on the picture plane. Rather than creating a photorealistic image, the three-dimensional movement of a figure is represented, visualizing optical flow as viewer’s proximity to the sculpture changes. A nuanced contour results, as the viewer shifts back and forth, altering how the structure of space is perceived. Similar to Fan Mirror, in the Angles Mirror, the sequence of movement across the picture plane is directed in part by its audience. When the viewer walks away from the work, or chooses to view the sculpture from a distance, a series of predefined images and transitions cover the object’s surface.

Mirror No.12 is a color video projection that processes live imagery captured from a small camera. Taking upon itself the same image building restrictions as the Angles Mirror, Mirror No.12 uses the rotational transformation of line as the sole means of representation. Resulting in a painterly texture, the artist-authored software manipulates a finite set of straight lines that spin from one position to the next, in an attempt to replicate a visual scene’s angular contours and features. Cropping the camera’s frame and virtually torquing its imagery three-dimensionally, the projection is bounded by an oval, evoking the surveillant effect of an observer gazing through the peephole in a door.

Inspired by Op Art from the 1950s and ’60s, Twisted Strips is a kinetic sculpture that explores serial image generation and perceptual illusion. Breaking the picture plane into a black field with twenty-one motorized white vertical strips, the sculpture produces rhythmic waves of movement. The animated pattern shifts in arc and frequency, as the two motors on each strip continually rotate in and out of phase. Using an approach visually analogous to the tape loop structures found in minimal music and phase music, new shapes constantly flow through the composition, which are perceived by the eye as a singular picture in motion.

A fully illustrated exhibition guide is available online and at the gallery.

Biography
New York-based artist Daniel Rozin (b. 1961, Jerusalem) creates interactive installations and sculptures that have the unique ability to change and respond to the presence of a viewer. His art is part of numerous public and private collections including the Chrysler Museum, Borusan, AT&T, Fidelity Investments, the Fundacion Privada Sorigue, the Perot Museum of Nature and Science, and MUSAC Fundacion, among others.

Past exhibitions of his work include the Reina Sofia National Museum, Madrid; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; The Garage CCC, Moscow; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Milwaukee Art Museum; Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester; Taiwan National Museum of Fine Art, Taipei; ICA Portland, Maine; the Central Academy of Fine Arts Museums, Beijing; the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem; and the Sundance Film Festival. In Fall 2014, he will open a new installation commissioned for the Taiwan Taoyuan international airport.
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source: designwork-s

キネクトやモーションセンシングなど、人の動きを認識するシステムが身近なものになりつつあり、ゲームなどの遊びの世界ではもちろん、生活の改善やプロモーション活動など、さまざまな分野で取り入れられるようになってきています。今回は、そんな人の動きを読み取って楽しめるアート「Angles Mirror」を紹介したいと思います。

以前Designworksの木のパネルでデジタルピクセルを表現した「Wooden Mirror」でも紹介しているアーティスト・Daniel Rozin氏によって制作された、見る人が感覚的に楽しめるアート作品となっています。プロモーションムービーが公開されていましたので、まずは下記よりご覧ください。

詳しくは以下

動きを制御された多数の時計の針が並ぶようなユニークなアート作品ですが、さらに驚くのが作品の前に人が立つと、その動きを認識して同じ動きを再現するということ。取り付けられているカメラが明るさを識別するようになっており、前に立った人が遮った光を感知して動きを再現しているそう。

システムとしてのおもしろさはもちろんですが、一見無機質に動く物体が突然自分の動きに合わせて動きを変えるというのは、未知の世界に入り込んだような不思議な感覚を楽しめそうですね。
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source: proliteru

Если взять определение слова Зеркало из wikipedia – это гладкая поверхность, предназначенная для отражения света (или другого излучения). Но не все так просто, Даниэль Розин (Daniel Rozin) создает необычные интерактивные инсталляции, которые можно назвать зеркалами, которые заставляют любого человека превращаться в маленького ребенка перед ними. Его последняя работа называется Angles и насчитывает 153 желтые палочки, которые вращаются как бабочки, подражая вашим действиям.