DESIGN STUDIO EMERGING OBJECTS

设计工作室新兴对象

saltygloo

source: cargocollective

The Saltygloo is an experiment in large-scale, light-weight additive manufacturing. It is constructed using 336 3D printed panels made from salt harvested from the San Francisco Bay, affixed together to form a semi-structural shell that is further supported with light-weight aluminum rods flexed in tension. Each tile recalls the crystalline form of salt and is randomly rotated and aggregated to create a larger structure where all tiles in the structure are unique. The form of the Saltygloo is drawn from the shape of the Inuit Igloo, but also the shapes and forms of tools and equipment found in the ancient process of boiling brine.
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source: 3d-exporu

American studio Emerging Objects 3D-printed this pavilion using salt harvested from San Francisco Bay. “The structure is an experiment in 3D printing using locally harvested salt from the San Francisco Bay to produce a large-scale, lightweight, additive manufactured structures,” said Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello of additive manufacturing startup Emerging Objects. They explained that 500,000 tonnes of sea salt are harvested each year in the San Francisco Bay Area using power from the sun and wind. “The salt is harvested from 109-year-old salt crystallisation ponds in Redwood City,” they said. “These ponds are the final stop in a five-year salt-making process that involves moving bay water through a series of evaporation ponds. In these ponds the highly saline water completes evaporation, leaving 8-12 inches of solid crystallised salt that is then harvested for industrial use.”

In addition to being a renewable resource, the salt is inexpensive compared to commercially available printing materials and creates strong lightweight components. They claim that their pavilion is the first to be printed from salt but draws on traditional techniques for building with the material. “No one has ever 3D-printed a building out of salt,” Rael told Dezeen. “However, there is a long tradition of architecture constructed of salt blocks, particularly in the Middle East and in desert environments. The 336 unique translucent panels of the Saltygloo structure were made in a powder-based 3D printing process where a layer of salt is applied then fixed in place selectively with a binding agent, before the next layer of salt is deposited and the process is repeated.

The panels were then connected together to form a rigid shell, further supported with lightweight aluminium rods flexed in tension.
“Each panel recalls the crystalline form of salt and is randomly rotated and aggregated to create a larger structure where all tiles in the structure are unique,” explained the designers.

“The form of the Saltygloo is drawn from the forms found in the Inuit igloos, but also the shapes and forms of tools and equipment found in the ancient process of boiling brine,” they added. “The translucent qualities of the material, a product of the fabrication process and the natural properties of salt, allow for natural light to permeate the space, highlight the assembly and structure, and reveal the unique qualities of one of humankind’s most essential minerals.” Rael and San Fratello are professors of architecture and design at the University of California Berkeley and San Jose State University. They founded Emerging Objects six months to focus on printing architecture from a diverse set of materials, largely renewable or sources from industrial waste, including some they have developed themselves.

Besides salt, they are also working in 3D-printed wood, cement and paper, adapting old models of 3D-printers to suit their materials and processes. “Emerging Objects is interested in the creation of 3D printed architecture, building components and furnishings that can be seen as sustainable, inexpensive, stronger, smarter, recyclable, customisable and perhaps even reparable to the environment,” they explain.
Description: Saltygloo by Emerging Objects. The Saltygloo pavilion follows a piece of furniture printed in the same way and the firm is now gearing up to produce a large-scale architectural room. “We see possibilities to create building enclosures and building cladding systems, as well as free standing walls using the salt material,” Rael told us.
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source: emergingobjects

Mission
Emerging Objects is a pioneering design and research company founded by two architects, Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello, whose goal is to print architecture by specializing in designing and 3D printing assemblies for the built environment using custom materials and processes.

About
Our research and designs focus on the development of innovative materials for large format 3D printing, expanding the potential of additive manufacturing to serve the fields of architecture, interior design, furniture design and product design. Our design research has served as the foundation for our consulting projects and we work with a range of industrial partners, nonprofit foundations and creative practices.

Vision
Emerging Objects is interested in the creation of 3D printed architecture, building components and furnishings that can be seen as sustainable, inexpensive, stronger, smarter, recyclable, customizable and perhaps even reparable to the environment. We want to 3D print long-lasting performance-based designs for the built environment using raw materials that have strength, tactility, cultural associations, relevance and beauty.

Because the inherent nature of 3D printing opens new possibilities for shaping materials, this process will reshape the way we as a society think about manufacturing and construction. Though rapid manufacturing, geometries can be created that would be impossible to create by hand or require expensive machinery to produce or reproduce. Because additive manufacturing requires no dies or molds, products can be mass-customized, employing the flexibility of computer-aided manufacturing systems, rather than mass- produced, allowing design parameters to be quick. 3D printing is also a fabrication method that minimizes waste which makes it an environmentally conscious method of manufacturing.

The Saltygloo is an experiment in 3-D printing using locally harvested salt from the San Francisco Bay to produce a large-scale, lightweight, additive manufactured structures. The Saltygloo takes its clues from the Inuit Igloo, both in form and concept. In the landscape of the San Francisco Bay Area natural power from the sun and wind, produce 500000 tonnes of sea salt each year.

The salt is harvested from 109-year-old salt crystallization ponds in Redwood City. These ponds are the final stop in a five-year salt-making process that involves moving bay water through a series of evaporation ponds. In these ponds the highly saline water completes evaporation, leaving 8-12 inches of solid crystallized salt that is then harvested for industrial use. From this landscape, a new kind of architecture is theorized and created through the lens of 3D printing and computer-aided design. The Saltygloo is made of a combination of salt harvested from the San Francisco Bay and glue, a “salty glue”, which makes an ideal 3D printing material, one that is strong, waterproof, lightweight, translucent and inexpensive.

To build the Saltygloo, 336 translucent panels were 3D printed using this unique material invention. Each panel recalls the crystalline form of salt and is randomly rotated and aggregated to create a larger structure where all tiles in the structure are unique. The form of the Saltygloo is drawn from the forms found in the Inuit Igloos, but also the shapes and forms of tools and equipment found in the ancient process of boiling brine. The panels are connected together to form a rigid shell that is further supported with lightweight aluminum rods flexed in tension, making the structure extremely lightweight and able to be easily transported assembled in only a few hours.

The translucent qualities of the material, a product of the fabrication process and the natural properties of salt, allow for natural light to permeate the space and highlight the assembly and structure and reveal the unique qualities of one of humankind’s most essential minerals.
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source: catalogodiseno

El estudio de diseño e investigación basado en la ciudad norteamericana de Oakland (Bahía de San Francisco) Emerging Objects es un startup que se especializa en el desarrollo de superficies de impresión 3d para producir objetos y soluciones espaciales que integren procesos de fabricación de bajo impacto.

Saltygloo , el ”Igloo de sal” es uno de los últimos proyectos del estudio. Diseñado por sus Co-Fundadores Ronald Rael y Virginia San Fratello, la estructura es un experimento de impresión 3D, inspirada en la forma del ”Inuit Igloo”, que utiliza sal recolectada en la Bahía de San Francisco como materia prima abundante y de bajo costo. El viento y el sol convierten el paisaje de la Bahía en el lugar perfecto para la producción de 500.000 toneladas de sal de mar cada año. El proceso comienza en la ciudad de Redwood City, ubicada en la misma bahía, donde se extrae sal de 109 años de edad desde sus estanques de cristalización. En estos estanques se produce la parada final de un proceso de producción de 5 años que implica mover agua de la bahía a través de una serie de lagunas de evaporación. En estos estanques, el agua altamente salina, completa su evporación dejando de 8 a 12 pulgadas de sal cristalizada que se recolecta para uso industrial. Es a partir de esta producción que Ronald y Virginia sueñan con un nuevo tipo de material para dar forma a espacios creados a partir de la impresión 3D y el diseño asistido por computador. El Saltygloo esta fabricado a partir 336 paneles o módulos que combinan sal de la bahía de San Francisco con pegamento, un ”pegamento salado” como le llaman ellos. El material es ideal para ser utilizado en impresión 3D, es fuerte, liviano, translúcido y de bajo costo. Los paneles están conectados entre sí para formar una estructura rígida que está reforzada con varillas de aluminio flexionadas en tensión, haciendo que la estructura sea extremadamente liviana y capaz de ser montada fácilmente.
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source: 3dwikiru

Американская компания Emerging Objects специализируется на разработке материалов для 3D-печати крупногабаритных объектов. Ее основатели, Рональд Раэль и Вирджиния Сан-Фрателло, постоянно ищут новые способы создания долговечных, недорогих и экологически чистых архитектурных компонентов и мебели.

Одно из последних творений Emerging Objects — павильон под названием “Saltygloo”, построенный из смеси морской соли и клея — «соленого клея». Этот материал хорошо подходит для 3D-печати — он крепкий, легкий, прозрачный и недорогой. Saltygloo состоит из 336 прозрачных панелей, которые дизайнеры напечатали на порошковом принтере от Z-Corp. Этот 3D-принтер, фактически, работает как струйный, формируя объект из слоев «соленого клея».

“Каждая панель своей формой напоминает кристалл соли. Чтобы построить большую конструкцию, каждый элемент которой уникален, в процессе ее сборки мы ориентировали панели в произвольном порядке”

— объясняют дизайнеры.

Дополнительную жесткость конструкции павильона придает каркас из алюминиевых стержней. Благодаря этому, Saltygloo отличается небольшим весом и прекрасно переносит транспортировку.

Прототипом необычного дизайна Saltygloo послужили как жилища эскимосов — иглу, так и формы инструментов и оборудования, использовавшегося в ходе древнего процесса выпаривания соли.

Дизайнеры добавляют:

Благодаря естественным свойствам соли и особенностям процесса производства, наш материал получился прозрачным. Благодаря этому, естественный свет проникает через стенки и подсвечивает павильон изнутри, раскрывая уникальные свойства одного из важнейших материалов человечества

В своих исследованиях, Emerging Objects использует, в основном, местное сырье. Их деревянный материал для 3D-печати производится из древесных опилок, а соль для постройки Saltygloo добыта на южной стороне Бухты Сан-Франциско
Кроме экспериментов с новыми материалами, фирма также работает над созданием комнаты, напечатанной на 3D-принтере.

Мы всегда хотели построить что-нибудь большее по размерам, чем сам принтер

— объясняет Раэль.

В настоящее время, Saltygloo демонстрируется в музее Дизайна и ремесел Сан-Франциско в рамках выставки New West Coast Design 2.
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source: mongcz

美国增材制造公司Emerging Objects的研究专注于3D打印大型体积的创新材料上。这家公司的创办者是Ronald Rael 和 San Fratello,Emerging Objects对于3D打印的建筑、建筑部件以及家具的创造很有研究,他们想要创造出舒适的、不昂贵的、更牢固的、更智能的、可回收的、与环境兼容的建筑或家具出来。他们最近的一个创造物是一个令人印象深刻的大型、轻量级的增材制造的结构,使用旧金山海湾的收成的盐制作而成的。这个名称为“Saltygloo”的结构是由盐和“salty glue”胶水结合制作,这两者结合产生了理想的3D打印材料——强度大的、轻量级的、半透明的쳬不昂贵。

为了构建Saltygloo,设计师们使用一个基于粉末的Z-corp3D打印机打印出336个透明的面板,使用独一无二的材料发明。这个3D打印机基本一个3D喷墨打印机一样运作,增加了“Salty glue”来粘合盐层,以成为牢固的物体。

“每一个面板都是由盐制成的透明面面板,并且可以随意旋转,还可以聚合在一起合成更大的结构,在这大的结构中所有的面砖都是独一无二的。”设计师们解释道。Saltygloo的成型是由从因纽特人冰屋中得到的灵感,但同时这个结构的外形和成型工具和设备也从古代沸腾盐水的过程得到了灵感。这些最后组合在一起构成一个刚性的外壳进一步利用轻量的铝制秆支撑张开,使这个结构极轻且可以容易的组装(几个小时)。“这个半透明的材料,制造工艺的成品以及盐的自然特质使外面的光可以渗进空间来,突出结构和显示人类最基本的矿物质的特质。”设计师们补充道。Emerging Objects主要使用当地的原材料来做研究。他们的木质材料是从简单的木屑支撑的,而盐是从旧金山海湾的南端收获的。联合创始人Ronald Rael解释说,该公司不断的寻求和增加更多的可再生的有机材料。除了开发新的可打印的3D耗材吗,该公司现在正在研究制造3D打印的房间。“我们一直想要创造出一些比机器大的东西。”Rael 解释。
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source: blogcults3d

L’entreprise américaine d’impression 3D Emerging Objects concentre ses recherches sur le développement de matériaux innovants pour l’impression 3D en grand format. Ses deux fondateurs Ronald Rael et San Fratello s’intéressent tout particulièrement aux composants de construction et d’ameublement pouvant être considérés comme durables, peu coûteux, solides et recyclables. Leur dernière création 3D en taille réelle a été construite à base de sel récolté dans la baie de San Francisco. Saltygloo est donc entièrement composé de briques de sel imprimées en 3D collées entre-elles par de la colle, également à base de sel. Pour les deux créateurs, ce matériau est solide, léger, peu coûteux et translucide, il est donc parfait pour la réalisation de ce type de structure.