GERHARD TRIMPIN

Nancarrow Percussion Orchestra

source: othermindsorg

Trimpin, a sound sculptor, composer, inventor, is one of the most stimulating one-man forces in music today. A specialist in interfacing computers with traditional acoustic instruments, he has developed a myriad of methods for playing, trombones, cymbals, pianos, and so forth with Macintosh computers. He has collaborated frequently with Conlon Nancarrow, realizing the composer’s piano roll compositions through various media. At the 1989 Composer-to-Composer conference in Telluride, Colorado, Trimpin created a Macintosh-controlled device that allowed one of Nancarrow’s short studies for player piano to be performed by mallets striking 100 Dutch wooden shoes arranged in a horseshoe from the edge of the balcony at the Sheridan Opera House. He also prepared a performance of Nancarrow’s studies at the Brooklyn Academy of Music for New Music America in 1989.

Trimpin was born in southwestern Germany, near the Black Forest. His early musical training began at the age of eight, learning woodwinds and brass instruments. In later years he developed an allergic reaction to metal which prevented him from pursuing a career in music, so he turned to electro-mechanical engineering. Afterwards, he spent several years living and studying in Berlin where he received his Master’s Degree from the University of Berlin.

Eventually he became interested in acoustical sets while working in theater productions with Samuel Beckett and Rick Cluchey, director of the San Quentin Drama Workshop. From 1985-87 he co-chaired the Electronic Music Department of the Sweelinck Conservatory in Amsterdam.

Trimpin now resides in Seattle where numerous instruments that defy description adorn his amazing studio. In describing his work, Trimpin sums it up as “extending the traditional boundaries of instruments and the sounds they’re capable of producing by mechanically operating them. Although they’re computer-driven, they’re still real instruments making real sounds, but with another dimension added, that of spatial distribution. What I’m trying to do is go beyond human physical limitations to play instruments in such a way that no matter how complex the composition of the timing, it can be pushed over the limits.”
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: thecrossingzinewordpress

Gerhard Trimpin, commonly known simply as Trimpin, is a Seattle-based kinetic sculptor and sound artist. Born and raised in Istein, Germany, he learned most of his trade from his father. A player of both wood and brass instruments, Trimpin took up the latter at a young age and soon developed an allergy to some of the metals used in the instruments, forcing him to quit playing. He then turned his attention to natural sounds and the relativity of sound in space. His father would take him into the woods and play him songs so he could walk around the surrounding forest, noting the subtle changes in his father’s playing.

After studying at the University of Berlin, Trimpin moved to Seattle in search of outdated technological components, which were more difficult to obtain in his home country. Throughout the early 1980s, he spent his winters fishing in Alaska to fund the coming year’s work. Before there was MIDI, Trimpin invented his own custom protocol, eventually transferring his works over when MIDI finally arrived. Preferring to use computer-driven components to the instruments themselves, he believes that loudspeaker design, which has remained the same for nearly 100 years, is unable to produce a high enough quality and range of tone to accurately re-create anything played in the traditional sense. However, he has broken his rule once. When he was commissioned by the Seattle Experience Music Project, he installed Roots and Branches: dozens of electric guitars wired in sequence to play only one note each, coming together to create a rich series of tunes. The sound is produced via loudspeaker and headphone modules located at the bottom of the contraption.

These days, Trimpin is still tinkering in his workshop, laughing at squeaking bottles, dropping glass vases, and whatever other quirky ways he manages to do what he does. Most recently, he has broken another one of his rules and let a documentary crew follow him around on an adventure inside his mind. Trimpin: The Sound of Invention should prove to be a treat for audio-visual fans everywhere.

Showing us that his personal rules may really mean nothing, there’s a great section of the film showcasing the preparation of a concert with the Kronos Quartet.

The film was first showcased at SXSW, and is still currently making its rounds. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem like it’s coming our way anytime soon. If you want to follow the film and send fan mail telling them to come to L.A., you should find your way over to its official website. There are a few tidbits from the film, as well as other mini docs on him via Youtube. Other than that, your best bet may be to move a little north.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: miradasnet

He aquí la historia de un ser peculiar que, con su desbordante imaginación, pone en cuestión los límites entre ruido y melodía, arte y artesanía, intuición y razón, genialidad y locura. Se trata de Gerhard Trimpin; una de las figuras artísticas más apasionantes y misteriosas de la música contemporánea. No resulta fácil dar con él —no está en myspace, no graba discos, no tiene móvil— y la sola existencia de este humilde documental es ya de por sí un motivo de celebración. Podemos asistir —sin apenas cargantes entrevistas laudatorias mediante— al taller de operaciones de este inventor de artilugios imposibles, de esculturas musicales que, sin la aparente intervención humana —pues funcionan mecánicamente—, logran integrarse en paisajes urbanos —desde museos hasta bares— dando una nueva dimensión a lo que entendemos como sonido ambiental (nada que ver con la música de ascensor, afortunadamente). Contemplar a Trimpin en acción es ya de por sí más que sugerente; la cámara lo sigue mientras busca deshechos metálicos en una chatarrería para sus complejos instrumentos o mientras prepara un concierto con el conjunto clásico The Kronos Quartet. Quizá el documento fílmico en sí poco tiene de rompedor, pero, desde una admirable cercanía, nos descubre a un músico que, en su insobornable pasión y creatividad, nos obliga a reflexionar sobre lo que significa ser artista. Si algo queda claro tras ver la película es que Trimpin existe (y existiría) más allá del mundo del Arte. La suya es una obra que surge fuera de toda intelectualización o impostura, desde la necesidad de crear más allá de los límites autoimpuestos por instituciones que aún pretenden determinar lo que es cultura y lo que no.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: lauber-methodede

Kennengelernt habe ich Trimpin (damals hieß er noch Gerhard Trimpin) vor über 30 Jahren in Berlin-Kreuzberg, wo wir uns in halben Abbruchhäusern die Nächte um die Ohren schlugen (ich mehr als er). Schon damals war ich davon fasziniert, dass er praktisch alle Instrumente spielte, die Noten beherrschte – und mir erklärte, wie sich das Instrument verbessern ließe.

„Instrumente verbessern“, das wurde die große Passion von Trimpin, der nun seit über 25 Jahren in Seattle lebt – und dort zu einem der bedeutendsten Schöpfer von Klangskulpturen geworden ist. Aber obwohl seine Skulpturen (eine der berühmtesten steht im Jimi-Hendrix-Museum in Seattle) vollgestopft mit Elektronik, mit Software sind, sind die erzeugten Töne natürlich.

So auch bei der „Jack-Box“: Hier arbeiten über 30 Computer, die dafür sorgen, dass automatisierte „Finger“ die Saiten nach unten auf das Griffbrett pressen – sodass völlig neue Spielmöglichkeiten entstehen. Selbst Jimi Hendrix, der begnadeteste Gitarist aller Zeiten würde sich noch wundern, was alles in einer Gitarre noch drin steckt. Auch ich bin gespannt, welches Potential in der „Jack Box“ schlummert, weshalb ich das Instrument Musikhochschulen zur Verfügung stellen will, Kompositionsaufträge vergeben möchte.

Trimpin verkörpert die perfekte Symbiose aus amerikanischem Show Business und europäischem Forscherdrang. So führt er auf einem der vielen Seen von Seattle schon einmal eine Performance auf, wo er Klavier auf einem untergehenden Floß spielt. Und bei einem Streifzug durch Kölsche Kneipen fiel ihm sofort der typische Bierkranz der Köbesse (so heißen da die freundlichen Kellner) auf: „So einer passte perfekt zur Jack Box“, meinte er – was mir als Freund des Kölsch (so heißt das lokale Bier) sofort einleuchtete. Nur, wie nachts einen Kranz bekommen, schließlich ist er Werkzeug der Köbesse?

Hülya, die Wirtin von der „Torburg“ am Severinstor, und ihr Mann Martin (Nachnahmen sind in Köln nicht so wichtig) waren die Retter. Sie schenkten dem sichtlich erfreuten Trimpin einen verbeulten Kranz, einschließlich der Gläser. Den nahm Trimpin mit nach Seattle, wo er daraus ein Schlagwerk für die „Jack Box“ konstruierte. Natürlich nicht irgendeines, sondern ein präzise gestimmtes, denn der Gag mit dem Kölsch-Kranz ist das eine, das perfekte Musikinstrument das noch wichtigere. Ach so, die „Jack Box“ inszeniert auch noch die „grundlegende, von Pythagoras entwickelte Theorie des Monochords“. Aber das ist wieder eine ganz andere Geschichte.

Wenige Musiker schaffen den Sprung nach Donaueschingen. Denn hier spielt seit über 80 Jahren die musikalische Avantgarde. Und noch weniger werden Musiker gleich mehrfach eingeladen – und haben auch noch zwei Aufführungen. Trimpin ist einer davon. Er tritt mit seinen „Sound Sculptures“ bereits zum dritten mal bei den Donaueschinger Musiktagen auf. Sicher auch ein Verdienst von Armin Köhler, dem dynamischen Kopf und Macher des Festivals. Nichts kann den SWR-Mann aus der Ruhe bringen, letztes Jahr hielt er mir noch im größten Trubel einen musiktheoretischen Exkurs über Interpretationstechniken.

Aber nicht nur mit der „Jack Box“ im Fischerhaus (das heißt so, weil hier früher über einen Abzweig des Schloßbaches Fische in ein Becken schwammen, was heute leider nicht mehr so ist) präsentiert sich Trimpin 2007 in Donaueschingen. Nein, auch über der symbolträchtigen Donauquelle senken sich aus Bambusstämmen gefertigte Instrumente zur „Klangquelle“ ins Wasser und erzeugen ebenfalls wieder natürliche Klänge – wobei die Bewegungen der Zuschauer rund um die Quelle Einfluß auf die musikalischen Abläufe nehmen.