GREGORY CREWDSON

GREGORY CREWDSON 88

source: anthonylukephotographyblogspot
Gregory Crewdson was born in Brooklyn, New York, on September 26, 1962. His first experience of photography, at the age of ten, was a Diane Arbus retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York
As a teenager, he was part of a punk rock group called The Speedies that hit the New York scene in selling out shows all over town. Their hit song “Let Me Take Your Photo” proved to be prophetic to what Crewdson would become later in life. In 2005, Hewlett Packard used the song in advertisements to promote its digital cameras.
In the mid 1980s, Crewdson studied photography at SUNY Purchase, near Port Chester, NY. He received his Master of Fine Arts from Yale University. He has taught at Sarah Lawrence, Cooper Union, Vassar College, and Yale University where he has been on the faculty since 1993. He is now a professor at Yale University of the Arts.
Gregory Crewdson’s photographs usually take place in small town America, but are dramatic and cinematic. They feature often disturbing, surreal events. The photographs are shot using a large crew, and are elaborately staged and lighted. Working at a mind-boggling scale, Crewdson creates his highly crafted surreal images and are very cinematic. He has cited the films Vertigo, The Night of the Hunter, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Blue Velvet, and Safe as having influenced his style, as well as the painter Edward Hopper and photographer Diane Arbus.
He apparently does everything in camera. Whatever it takes, he’ll build a set, create fog or rain. No cloning or CG is used to create these marvelously complex and compelling images. “a perfect moment ”
Crewdson is represented in London at White Cube.
“… I’m interested in using the iconography of nature and the American landscape as surrogates or metaphors for psychological anxiety, fear or desire. “~ Crewdson
“Every artist has a central story to tell, and the difficulty, the impossible task, is trying to present that story in pictures. “~ Crewdson
“The suburban landscape is alien and strange and exotic. I photograph it out of longing and desire. My photographs are also about repression and internal angst. ” ~ Crewdson
” I think my pictures are really about a kind of tension between my need to make a perfect picture and the impossibility of doing so. Something always fails, there’s always a problem, and photography fails in a certain sense… This is what drives you to the next picture. “~ Crewdson
“Originally, one of the reasons I was drawn to photography, as opposed to painting or sculpture or installation, is that of all the arts it is the most democratic, in so far as it’s instantly readable and accessible to our culture. Photography is how we move information back and forth. ” ~ Crewdson
“My pictures must first be beautiful, but that beauty is not enough. I strive to convey an underlying edge of anxiety, of isolation, of fear. ” ~ Crewdson
” All my pictures are very voyeuristic, but ultimately I’m looking at what lurks in my own interior. I make photographs because I want to answer the question of what propels me to do the things that I do. But that always remains a mystery. ” ~ Crewdson
“…the photograph is still and frozen. From day one, I have been interested in taking that limitation and trying to find the strength in it—like a story that is forever frozen in between moments, before and after, and always left as a kind of unresolved question. ” ~ Crewdson
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source: offmagblogspot
Gregory Crewdson is an American photographer who is best known for elaborately staged, surreal scenes of American homes and neighborhoods.
Crewdson was born in Park Slope, a neighborhood in Brooklyn. As a teenager was part of a punk rock group called The Speedies that hit the New York scene in selling out shows all over town. Their hit song “Let Me Take Your Foto” proved to be prophetic to what Crewdson would become later in life. In 2005, Hewlett Packard used the song in advertisements to promote its digital cameras.
In the mid 1980s Crewdson studied photography at SUNY Purchase. He received his Master of Fine Arts from Yale University. He has taught at Sarah Lawrence, Cooper Union, Vassar College and Yale University where he has been on the faculty since 1993.
Crewdson is represented in New York at the Luhring Augustine Gallery and in London by the White Cube Galler.
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source: agonistica
Crewdson is one of the best photographers of the world. Gregory Crewdson’s work is in many collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan
Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum, LACounty Museum. A traveling exhibition of his work is now touring museums in Europe. The body of work featured in the film is “Beneaththe Roses,” and was produced from 2002-2008. The photographs at the end of the film, of the back-lot of Cinetta’ studios in Rome, are “Sanctuary,” which premiered in 2010.
With unprecedented access, director Ben Shapiro filmed Crewdson for a decade, beginning in 2000. Throughout the film we witness his work grow and deepen, garner worldwide acclaim, and reach a climax of creative change as Crewdson’s inspiration spirals in a radical new direction. The result is an intimate view of the creation of iconic works by one of the most renowned and influential artists of our time.
Shapiro says about this Gregory Crewdson’s movie:
Brief Encounters was filmed over a ten-year span. I first encountered Crewdson and
his work in 2000, when I was working on a piece about him for the PBS series EGG. I was immediately struck by the beauty and power of his images, and also by the care, vision, and complexity of the productions. The first Crewdson shoot I filmed was in Lee, Massachusetts—he was making a photograph of a man, apparently just returned home from work, who has removed his suit and is climbing a flowercovered beanstalk that has burst through the lawn.
Members of Crewdson’s team spent the day sorting through dozens of boxes of fresh flowers, carefully positioning and stapling them one at a time to the beanstalk, which was in fact a recycled telephone pole. It was an introduction to the kind of detail that contributes so much to the richness of his work. Most of the filming of Brief Encounters was done between 2005 and 2009, when Crewdson was creating his epic series of photographs, “Beneath the Roses.” When I proposed making the film, he was completely supportive and encouraging, as he remained throughout the entire production. He granted me virtually unlimited access, from pre-production location scouting, right through to the taking of the pictures.
A few times I even filmed from a position on the set itself, hidden from his camera by a piece of scenery. I worked solo during nearly all of the filming, and eventually became a frequent and relatively unnoticed fixture on his sets.
I filmed periodically, across many of Crewdson’s shoots, unsure how the film would ultimately end. Then Crewdson himself provided a conclusion by finishing the “Beneath the Roses” series. He also decided he was done, at least for the time being, with such large scale productions. His subsequent body of work, “Sanctuary,” appears at the end of the film: black and white images of the decaying backlot of the famous Cinecitta studios outside of Rome. He worked there with a small crew, and apart from spraying some water on the ground, or adding some smoke, he captured the abandoned movie sets as they were. His “Sanctuary” photographs premiered in 2010.
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source: fotoktoru
Грегори Крюдсон (Gregory Crewdson) – американский фотограф, известный тщательно поставленными, сюрреалистичными сценами американской жизни. Родился в 1962 году в Нью-Йорке. Окончил Йельский университет.
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source: lemadblog
Les photos de Gregory Crewdson, des mises en scène figées, ne sont pas sans rappeler celles des tableaux de Hopper, le côté angoissant aux limites du fantastique en plus… Ce photographe américain cite d’ailleurs le peintre comme source d’inspiration, au même titre que la photographe Diane Arbus dont le sujet de prédilection étaient les personnages marginaux, atypiques ou considérés comme « Freaks », et que de nombreux films tels « Sueurs froides » d’Alfred Hitchcock, « Rencontres du troisième type » de Steven Spielberg et « Blue Velvet » de David lynch.
Quelque part entre voyeurisme et fantastique, décalage et angoisse, les images de Gregory Crewdson sont fascinantes… A découvrir ci-dessous ou sur son site.
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source: totalstreetcl
Gregory es un fotógrafo estadounidense conocido por la serie de inquietantes imágenes surrealistas que ha hecho; éstas se basan en la idea de la vida cotidiana en el barrio y con la familia clásica americana, generando escenas que salen de lo real y atraviesan las concepciones de lo común.
Además, el año pasado fue el lanzamiento del documental que refleja el trabajo y las mega producciones que se necesitan para la elaboración de cada una de sus fotografías.
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source: taringanet
Gregory Crewdson nació en Brooklyn en 1962. Su trabajo es reconocido por sus escenas surrealistas de los hogares y vecindarios americanos. De adolescente formo parte de un grupo de punk rock llamado “The Speedis”, cuya exitosa canción “Let Me Take Your Foto” (Déjame aprovechar tu foto) ha resultado ser profética de lo que Crewdson se convertiría más tarde. En el 2005 Hewlett Packard utilizaría la canción para la publicidad de sus cámaras digitales. A mediados de 1980 estudia fotografía en el SUNY Purchase, cerca de puerto de Chester en Nueva York. Recibirá un Master en Bellas Artes en la universidad de Yale y será profesor en Sarah Lawrence, Cooper Union, Vassar College y la Universidad de Yale, en cuya facultad ha estado hasta 1993. Crewdson está representado en Nueva York en la Galería Agustín Luhring y en Londres por la galería White Cube.
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source: sentieriselvaggiit
Sarà presentato in anteprima a Marzo al SXSW Festival di Austin, Texas, Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters, diretto da Ben Shapiro e dedicato al celebre fotografo. Le sue immagini sembrano frame di film che catturano l’anima più quotidiana e oscura della provincia americana
Sarà presentato in anteprima a Marzo al SXSW Festival di Austin, Texas, il documentario Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters, diretto da Ben Shapiro e dedicato al celebre fotografo.
Gregory CrewdsonLe sue immagini sembrano frame di film che catturano l’anima più quotidiana e oscura della provincia americana. Per lo scrittore americano Russell Banks, che ha firmato un’introduzione alla sua opera, le immagini di Gregory Crewdson sono ancora più libere e aperte di un film, perchè costringono chi le osserva a immaginarlo interamente, partendo da una sola suggestione.
In Italia è stata la grande personale a Palazzo delle Esposizioni a Roma, nel 2008, a mostrare buona parte dell’incredibile universo in grande formato di Crewdson.
Un fotografo che non si limita a “catturare” le sue immagini nello scatto: le crea, attraverso un elaborato processo di ideazione e progettazione che dura settimane e comprende l’uso di sofisticati sistemi di illuminazione e il contributo di una squadra di oltre 60 persone tra scenografi, tecnici, truccatori, comparse: proprio come sul set di un film.
Per descrivere le sue serie più famose, Twilight (1998-2002) Dream House (2002) e Beneath the Roses (2003-2005) sono stati fatti riferimenti pittorici (Edward Hopper) fotografici (Walker Evans, William Eggleston, Jeff Wall) e si possono cercare infiniti riferimenti a quel gotico americano così profondamente radicato nella letteratura e nella musica degli Stati Uniti, ma forse è proprio quello cinematografico l’immaginario di cui Crewdson sembra innamorato, al punto di ricrearlo fisicamente in una rilettura originale.
Le foto di Gregory CrewdsonLe sue periferie, ora residenziali, ora povere, i suoi quadri perfetti che svelano angosciose incongruenze, sembrano uscite da una rilettura surreale di Todd Haynes, Paul Thomas Anderson o Alfred Hitchcock.
I suoi fasci di luce blu, che colpiscono un sobborgo addormentato, e la natura circostante che si riappropria di luoghi abitati creando stranianti paesaggi, sembrano venire dalla fantascienza americana degli anni ’80, richiamando ora l’innocenza perduta di Spielberg ora i germi della malattia di Cronenberg; i suoi tableaux vivant domestici e le ambientazioni twinpeaksiane fanno pensare immediatamente a David Lynch.
Chiamato a elencare i suoi 5 film preferiti di tutti i tempi, Crewdson cita nell’ordine: Vertigo, La morte corre sul fiume, Incontri ravvicinati del terzo tipo, Blue Velvet e Safe.
In alcune delle sue foto spuntano le star, ma totalmente spogliate della patina glamorous che li ricopre d’abitudine nei photoshoot promozionali, piuttosto, chiamate a interpretare veri e propri ruoli: Tilda Swinton, Jennifer Jason-Leigh, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Gwyneth Paltrow, Julianne Moore, William H. Macy. Celebre è anche il quadretto familiare al tempo stesso realista e fantastico realizzato da Crewdson per Alan Ball, per promuovere una delle sue serie favorite, che ha molti punti in comune con il suo lavoro: Six Feet Under.
Nella serie Sanctuary (2010) Crewdson ha cambiato apparentemente stile, fotografando in bianco e nero i set abbandonati di Cinecittà – ma solo per riflettere ancora una volta sui temi della rappresentazione, della finzione e sulla natura fantasmatica del cinema.
Le foto di Gregory CrewdsonNel documentario Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters, realizzato in oltre dieci anni, seguendo Crewdson a partire dal 2000 (inizialmente come parte di un tv show di PBS dedicato all’arte, chiamato Egg) e soffermandosi in particolare sulla sua lunga serie Beneath the Roses, Ben Shapiro offre uno sguardo privilegiato sul modo in cui l’artista crea le sue immagini e intende svelare la storia dell’uomo dietro a quella del professionista.
Crewdson si racconta, dall’influenza del padre psicologo al fascino che hanno esercitato su di lui, ancora bambino, le immagini di Diane Arbus, al modo in cui le paure dell’infanzia, le ansie e i desideri degli adulti e l’influenza della cultura pop si mescolano nel suo lavoro.
Shapiro aveva già diretto il corto Beneath the Roses nel 2005, oltre a lavorare come operatore di ripresa in altri documentari, da HBO a National Geographic, dal Sundance Channel alla CBS.
Sempre nel 2005 è stato realizzato un altro documentario dedicato all’artista: Gregory Crewdson: The Aesthetics of Repression, diretto dal filmaker indipendente Michael Blackwood.
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source: strasznasztukabloxpl
Gregory Crewdson, amerykański fotograf urodzony w 1962 roku jest autorem niepokojących serii zdjęć ukazujących wnętrza amerykańskich domów oraz ulice małych miast oraz przedmieść Nowej Anglii.
Jego fotografie określane są jako surrealistyczne, można je też odnieść do tajemniczych obrazów Edwarda Hoppera oraz do filmów braci Coen. Szczególnie bliski klimatowi tych fotografii wydaje się Burton Fink (1991), którego sceny rozgrywały się między innymi we wnętrzach taniego hotelu, gdzie pojawiały się rzeczy niemożliwe i powodujące dreszcz niepokoju (na przykład pocące się z gorąca ściany, które w końcu zaczynały się palić).
Takie niepokojące elementy, niemożliwe, wzięte z innej rzeczywistości, pojawiają się też u Crewdsona, np. woda zalewająca salon w fotografii przywołującej przedstawienie Ofelii czy hodowane we wnętrzu kwiatu na jednym ze zdjęć z serii Beneath the Roses (2003 – 2008).
O seriach fotograficznych Crewdsona pisze Filip Lipiński, że „zachowują wspólny mianownik: są nasycone aurą niesamowitości, pęknięć i rozsunięć, które skutecznie naruszają spójną powłokę zewnętrznego wyglądu na rzecz tego, co stłumione, wyłaniającej się mentalnej i optycznej nieświadomości”. Dlatego też można te prace interpretować jako rodzaj wizualnej psychoanalizy.
Często pojawiają się w tych scenach lustra lub lustrzane odbicia. Ukazane we wnętrzach osoby ulegają zwielokrotnieniu, jakby osaczone przez własne wizerunki. Nie wiadomo, czy postacie te zgłębiają tajniki swej tożsamości, czy może konfrontują się z własnymi mrocznymi sekretami, a może próbują uciec przed samotnością, niewątpliwie jednak sceny te są reminiscencją scen z amerykańskich filmów (jak wiele jest ujęć ukazujących kobiety przeglądające się w lustrze, co odnosi się do ich dylematów!). I nie przypadkiem jedną z mistrzyń Crewdsona jest Cindy Sherman.
Interesujący jest sposób pracy tego artysty. Filip Lipiński wskazuje, że scenografie wnętrz powstają w zasadzie „od zera” w hali zdjęciowej, gdzie artysta konstruuje „potężny plan zdjęciowy, często niczym nieróżniący się od planu filmowego. Jest to moment, gdy ów rzekomy znaleziony widok, często wybrany dlatego, że niejasno jeszcze przypomniał coś innego, jakiś inny obraz, ulega pre-fotograficznej transformacji i inscenizacji za pomocą dużej liczby sztucznych źródeł światła, zaaranżowanym warunkom pogodowym, szczegółowej dyspozycji postaci i najmniejszych nawet artefaktów”. To światło oraz późniejsza praca fotografa powoduje, że wszystko na zdjęciu wydaje się być równo wyostrzone.
I te właśnie efekty sprawiają, że te zdjęcia wydają się tak niesamowite. W ten sposób Crewdson, jak sam powiada, „dokonuje teatralizacji codzienności, która nie tyle przesłania, co ujawnia to, co skryte lub niedostrzegane”.
Mimo, że to, co przedstawione jest wyjątkowo ostre, i tak można mieć wrażenie, że coś ukryte jest w mroku (a niekiedy paradoksalnie w oślepiającym dziwnym świetle), że protagoniści tych scen znajdują się w zasadzce, że właśnie stało się coś złego lub za chwilę nadejdzie niebezpieczeństwo, że nie ma już możliwości ratunku ani ucieczki. Jak w dobrym thrillerze, to, co najstraszniejsze jest niewidoczne, zaledwie sugerowane, wyłania się jedynie z wyobraźni i dlatego – tak bardzo niepokoi.