Juan Betancurth

Ladder

Juan Betancurth   Ladder

source: residencyunlimitedorg
Juan Betancurth’s stage-like installations have the subdued air of a memorial filled with handmade devices. Drawn from domestic routines and religious rites his site-specific installations offer the viewer a space for experimentation and contemplation. Different meanings are attached to each object, such as restriction, liberation or control. Betancurth wishes to awaken the creative mind within the spectator, propelling the use of his sculptures. Through interaction the performative aspect of his work comes to the fore where each piece individually holds a singular meaning yet collectively constitutes a coherent site-specific installation.

Juan Betancurth is a Colombian born artist (b.1972) living and working in Brooklyn, NY. Selected exhibitions include Dirty Looks On Location, New York, (2012), Sketchy Walk in collaboration with Todd Shalom, The New Museum, New York, (2012), On/Sincerity, Boston University College of Fine Arts, Boston MA (2012), For Faith, Pain or Pleasure, Bulletin Board, CCS BARD College, Red Hook, New York, (2012), Chamber of Delights, El Museo del Barrio Biennial, New York, (2011), Domesticus (2011), Abrons Arts Center, New York and Altar to Myself / Installation, Queens Museum of Art, New York, (2006).
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source: artsynet
Juan Betancurth’s practice is about blurring boundaries, between subjects and mediums alike; his work explores dreams, memory, and the present day through sculpture, installation, performance, and combinations thereof. He is especially interested in themes of family tradition, power, and submission, in particular as they relate to his personal experiences. To explore these ideas, Betancurth crafts meticulous, immersive installations, filled with sculptures and props that set the stage for his intimate performances of witchcraft, daily routines, poetry, and religious rituals. Site-specificity is an important concern in many of his works, as in Dirty Looks: On Location, a video streamed in a booth at a gay sex shop in Manhattan, or Sketchy Walk at the New Museum, for which the artist reconstructed the gay cruising milieu that once characterized the Museum’s Bowery location. As personal and ambiguous as many of his works are, Betancurth hopes that they encourage creativity in each viewer, creating a fleeting moment and space for community.