Kate Gilmore

كيت غيلمور
קייט גילמור
케이트 길모어
КЕЙТ ГИЛМОР

Leak from the Top

Kate Gilmore   Leak from the Top

source: paddle8

About the artwork: This photograph occurred during a performance/video in summer 2012 in Skowhegan, Maine. In this piece, 4 women attempt to hold in wet paint that is spilling out of holes in the buckets.

About the artist: Kate Gilmore is an installation, video, and performance-based artist. Her work has been exhibited at MoCA Cleveland; the 2010 Whitney Biennial; the Brooklyn Museum; The Kitchen; Indianapolis Museum of Art; Bryant Park (Public Art Fund); Locust Projects; White Columns; Contemporary Art Center, Cincinnati; Artpace; The J. Paul Getty Museum; The Rose Art Museum; Istanbul Museum of Art, Haifa Museum of Art, and PS1/MoMA Contemporary Art Center (“Greater New York,” 2005). Gilmore has been the recipient of several international awards and honors, such as the Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Award for Artistic Excellence, the Franklin Furnace Fund for Performance, Louis Comfort Tiffany Biennial Award, the LMCC Workspace residency, New York Foundation for The Arts Fellowship, and The Marie Walsh Sharpe Space Residency. Her work is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Brooklyn Museum; Whitney Museum of American Art; Museum of Fine Art, Boston; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Indianapolis Museum of Art; and Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: davidcastillogallery

Kate Gilmore imposes upon her own physicality in post-feminist critiques of sex and gender. Gilmore shapes an aggregate of performance, video, sculpture and photography with self-imposed restrictions and challenging objectives that recall the absurdity of Dadaism, the hyperbole of political cartoons, and the rigidity of political correctness. Thus Gilmore may find herself thwarted by high-heeled shoes in a humbling endeavor to surmount a literal wall of her own construction. Gilmore not only animates the essences and suppositions of ego and id, but positions them in a duel for personal integrity.

Kate Gilmore was born in Washington D.C. and lives and works in New York, NY. Recent exhibitions include: The Fourth Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art, Moscow, Russia; Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland; Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY; Greater New York: 5 year Review, PS1/MoMA Queens, NY, among others. Her work has been included in national and international exhibitions including the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, CA; Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY; RISD Museum of Art, Providence, RI; MAK Museum of Art, Vienna, Austria; and Greater New York 2005 at PS1/MoMA Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City, NY. The artist’s work is in the permanent collections of Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY; Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY; Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA), Chicago, IL; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA; Verbund Collection, Vienna, Austria; Sammlung Julia Stoschek Collection, Dusseldorf, Germany; LAC, Lambert Collection, Geneva, Switzerland; Fondazione Morra Greco, Naples, Italy; Collezione La Gaia, Busca, Italy; Centro Sperimentale per le Arti Contemporanee (CESAC), Caraglio, Italy.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: mocaclevelandorg

Messy, chaotic, and excessive, Kate Gilmore’s performance-based works show the artist confronting absurd physical challenges. In all of her works, Gilmore wears distinctly feminine attire, including tight floral dresses and high heels. This clothing contrasts with the strenuous activities she undertakes, while also serving to make them more awkward and difficult. At times, Gilmore’s actions appear laughable and doomed to fail. At others, the artist rages in a mode of creative destruction, provoking a complex range of responses, from pity and amusement, to empathy and admiration.

Gilmore offers a contemporary reassessment of both hardcore and feminist performance practices that emerged in the 1960s and 70s, established by artists such as Marina Abramović, Chris Burden, and Carolee Schneemann. These artists also used their bodies to explore physical limits and social norms, often through exposure and endurance. Drawing from this history, Gilmore creates a personal, persistent, and tragi-comic method, using her body as a site to articulate female identity, artistic labor, and resistance.

Body of Work surveys a decade of Gilmore’s forceful output, bringing together five key works on video and a newly commissioned performance, displayed in the gallery as both video and sculptural installation. This new work, Love ’em, Leave ’em (2013), presents a 10-foot tall structure which Gilmore repeatedly climbs, carrying hundreds of vases and pots filled with paint. Dropped from above, the vessels shatter and splatter into a cohesive composition. The clean, white, monumental structure refers to Minimalist forms, while the explosive action and dripping paint allude to Abstract Expressionism. Humorously and destructively engaging these modernist tropes, Gilmore challenges their heroic myths and the gendered stereotypes of art making in general.

Kate Gilmore (1975, Washington, D.C.) lives and works in New York. Exhibitions of her work have been held at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, and Parasol Unit, London. In 2010 she participated in the Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Collections holding her work include The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: archijobcoil

Buster, 2011 עבודתה של קייט גילמור בגלריה ברורמן – Built to Burst הינה פרויקט וידאו המכיל מיצב גדול מימדים המשמש במה לפרפורמנס. מיצב זה הופך לציור דו מימדי במצלמה. האמנית משתמשת בגופה בכדי לשנות את האובייקט לדבר חדש, תוך חשיפת עבודת האמנות בפעולותיה האלימות. מתוך ההרס והאקט האלים נובע היפה. הפעולות האגרסיביות של האמנית מעלות את המתח שבין תפקידה הנשי הסטריאוטיפי כפי שהוא נתפש ומצופה על יד הצופה, ובין הפעולות האלימות והבלתי צפויות של גילמור אשר מרמזות להתנהגות גברית וברוטלית.
הקונסטרוקציה בתכנונו של המעצב התעשייתי שולי שטראוס, מורכבת מחמש פלטפורמות אשר בנויות בהתאמה למימדים של הגלריה ושל פריים מצלמת הוידאו. ממבט על, המצלמה מביטה כלפי מטה אל הפסל והמיצג המתרחש בתוכו, כשאת המסך ממלא הפסל והפעולות המתרחשות בו. על הקונסטרוקציה מונחים מעל מאה כלי חרס מלאים בצבע המוצבים על הפלטפורמות. גילמור הולכת וזוחלת לאורך שולי הפלטפורמות תוך שהיא שופכת, שוברת ומפילה את כלי החרס וגורמת לצבע להישפך ולכלים להישבר. פעולה זו יוצרת מעין ‘ציור’ מופשט בעדשת המצלמה. ישנם שני צבעים בשימוש [לבן וכתום] כאשר הצבע מתחלף בכל שלב של המבנה, בעוד הקונסטרוקציה עצמה צבועה אפור מתכתי. חשיבות חלל הגלריה כמקום ההתרחשות הספציפי של העבודה, בא לידי ביטוי בפסל המבוסס על מימדי ופרופורציות הצילום [16:9] ועל מגבלות החלל הפיזי. מתוך הגבלות אלו אשר מגדירות את המיצב, נולד ציור במצלמה. המוצר הסופי מורכב מפסל גדול מימדים, עבודת וידאו וצילומים.