Katharina Trudzinski

Катарина Trudzinski
Katharina Trudzinski

source: trendhunter

Katharina Trudzinski is a talented artist who is making a name for herself through the creation of abstract 3D collages and paintings. Dabbling in all things contemporary, Katharina Trudzinski’s work is as thought-provoking as it is artistic. Both the sculptures and paintings will inspire people to look into their depths to either figure out the meaning behind each or to simply lose themselves in the haphazard twists and turns.

Living and working in Hamburg, Germany, Katharina Trudzinski has an extraordinary skill for color palettes and wild techniques that may very well boggle the minds of gallery goers everywhere. From paintings spilling onto the floor to slew of empty frames, Katharina Trudzinski puts together art shows that are entirely immersive. Seeing one in person would be a complete treat.
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source: zoominfo
When Hamburg-based artist and textile designer Katharina Trudzinski decided to take a second residence in Berlin this spring, she found an inexpensive live-work space on the fringes of the up-and-coming Neuköln neighborhood – the city’s equivalent of Bushwick, Brooklyn – and saved two months’ rent by promising the landlord she’d renovate. But it was imagination, not thrift, that inspired her next move: After stripping the wood paneling from the walls and ceilings and tearing down a few ill-conceived door frames, she began painting the detritus and incorporating it into her sculptural installations and high-relief paintings. Made from constellations of scraps, street finds, and everyday junk cloaked in perfectly calibrated hues, her work – some of which becomes inspiration for the pieces in her clothing line – is meant to dialogue with its surroundings. “It’s not my intent that the materials should be cheap, I just like to use things that are around me,” she says.
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source: thefoxisblack

Berlin-based sculptor and painter Katharina Trudzinski creates pieces that defy logic and speak directly to the viewer’s senses. When I look at Trudzinski’s installations I find that I am unable to intellectualise or make sense of her work, and instead get lost in her intriguing use of space and form. Trained in textile design, this disciplinary background can be seen in her manipulation of pattern, colour and texture, as well as the tactile approach to her art practice. However, rather than using fabric and thread, Trudzinski knits and weaves with objects such as wood and paddle pop sticks to produce her unique surface patterning effect. According to a recent interview with Sight Unseen, Trudzinski utilises a vast array of reclaimed and found materials, claiming that “It’s not my intent that the materials should be cheap, I just like to use things that are around me…I like to start with what I’ve got.” Not a bad philosophy, I’d say.thefoxisblack