KONRAD SMOLEŃSKI

Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More

source: konradsmolenski

Konrad Smoleński works the fields of photography, video art, installation, performance and happening. He is one of the pillars of the Panerstwo group based in Poznan and an animator of the alternative music scene Pink Punk. Smolenski often makes use of spectacular pyrotechnic effects, in contrast minimal with the usually minimal punk aesthetic. A fine, chiselled precision is typical of his works, and this quality that gives them the purified, ascetic character. The artist has also experimented with music production through ‘Sound Booming’, guerrilla concerts by the group BNNT. Konrad Smolenski’s practice brims with surprising objects, such as bombs made out of gymnastic balls, or music instruments constructed from military missiles. Such objects are marked with his intervention (being shot through or burnt, for example) and enter into dialogue with the concept of the ready-mades. A sense of anxiety can be found under the aesthetic layer of Smolenski’s works, drawing the most fundamental questions about fear, death and the ultimate.

Konrad Smolenski is a multimedia artist, who expertly uses film, music, performance, and object. Irrespective of the chosen technique or a combination of them, the artist displays an above-average knowledge of the tricks of trade of each medium, an ability that has been known as artistry. Technical perfection of Smolenski’s works comes as a surprise taking into consideration the subjects he takes on and the conspicuous presence of the vibrant and openly anarchist personality of the author, who is not so much an implicit trace but the cornerstone of this oeuvre. Hypnotic movie stills and their virtuoso editing as well as soundtracks of powerful impact, painlessly introduce the viewer into an alternative field of perception, designed by Smolenski to ultimately destroy the viewer and confront him with the borderline experience of the brutally inevitable, such as decay or death. In spite of their uncompromising attitude, their display of ultimate subjects and a regular use of very intrusive forms, Smolenski’s works are balanced off by subtlety, with and unbounded liberty.

Everything Was Forever, Until it Was No More is a sculptural instrument that reproduces, at regular intervals, a music piece written for bronze bells, wide range loudspeakers, and other resonating objects. The composition is based on a contrast between the symbolically rich sound of the bells and the abstract resounding noise. By using a delay effect, Smoleński offers an insight into a world where history has come to a standstill, thereby approaching the radical propositions of contemporary physics with its perception of the passage of time as an illusion.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: youtube

Konrad Smoleński represents Poland at the Venice Art Biennale 2013. His monumental installation in the Polish Pavilion in the Biennale’s Giardini is titled Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More. The work is a continuation of the previous explorations of Konrad Smoleński, who focuses his interest on sound. Two church bells that have been cast especially for this exhibition are at the center of the installation. Two walls of loudspeakers and other elements complete the work. In regular intervals, the traditional bronze bells, full-range speakers and other sonorous objects play a symphony. The create both a visual and aural experience, where the delaying and modifying of the initial sound of the bell is important. The exhibition Konrad Smoleński: Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More is curated by Daniel Muzyczuk and Agnieszka Pindera.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: labiennale

Konrad Smoleński (1977) graduated from the Poznań Academy of Fine Arts (2002). He has shown his work in numerous exhibitions at the following venues, among others: Ludwig Museum, Budapest; Pinchuk Art Center, Kyiv; Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen; Waterside Contemporary, London; Offen auf AEG, Nuremberg; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; and Zachęta — National Gallery of Art, Warsaw. Holder of the Polish Ministry of Culture and National Heritage fellowship (2000). Winner of the Deutsche Bank Foundation Award — Views 2011. He lives and works in Warsaw (PL) and Bern (CH).

The work at the Polish Pavilion is a logical continuation of the artist’s research into flows and eruptions of energy. Thus, his previous pieces and their qualities can work as a context in analyzing Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More. The work at the Polish Pavilion is a logical continuation of the artist’s research into flows and eruptions of energy. Thus, his previous pieces and their qualities can work as a context in analyzing Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More.

The two hand-made bronze bells which form the core of Konrad Smoleński’s installation at the Polish Pavilion successfully convey a somewhat crude and “primitive” character of a work that alludes to the traditional craft of bell-founding. The bells located in the central part of the building, along with the rows of broadband speakers echoing them and the two opposing walls of metal cases, serve as an example of a model stereophonic system. Although the form of the individual constituents seems familiar, the interaction between them in this relatively small space is quite startling. What seems especially out of place in this arrangement is the idiophones which are normally placed well above the line of vision. Moreover, the purpose of the two hundred small metal doors is open to interpretation — their size and appearance are quite universal and may be associated with a number of different public spaces and the respective functions that correspond to them. Each of the constituents of this visual and aural arrangement plays an equal part. In Smoleński’s composition the sound of a traditional instrument is first recorded in real time and then processed, delayed and retransmitted. This is alternated with a monotonous drone from the enormous speakers, and finally the sound reverberates through the metal structures which are integrated with the architecture of the pavilion.

Previously shown in Venice, the sound sculpture is based primarily on the manipulation of the tolling of a bell — an ancient instrument which has for centuries set the rhythm of our earthly and “eternal” lives. While transforming this familiar sound, Smoleński changes its meaning: a sound that evokes a variety of associations is now given an abstract frequency which seems devoid of connotations. Not only does the artist free the signal from its source, but he also resorts to the use of delay and reverberation. The accumulation of acoustic waves provides the broadcast sound with a weight which has a direct impact on all the subjects and objects around the installation. It appears that the acoustic signal can move the molecules of both animate and inanimate objects with an equal force.

The installation in the Polish Pavilion is a continuation of more than a decade of explorations carried out by a visual artist with a keen interest in sound. Smoleński’s works combine punk rock aesthetics with the precision and elegance typical of minimalism. The artist uses both traditional and self-constructed sound objects to examine the flow of energy and its interaction with the audience. By exploring the possibilities of electricity, sound waves and PA systems, the artist manipulates the meanings we usually attribute to objects which are typically used in rock culture.

These artistic endeavors and the way Smoleński uses his “instruments” in Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More bring to mind the illusory nature of time, as proclaimed by Julian Barbour. This British theoretical physicist undermines the significance of time while conjuring up his vision of a timeless universe, where one of the key categories is the present perceived as a three-dimensional snapshot, and where the chronological ordering of events is a result of nothing more than our memory of individual “Nows.” Therefore, time, according to Barbour, is but a sensation of temporality, enhanced by what he calls “time capsules”, or records of what we believe to have existed in the past.

Aside from Barbour’s hypotheses, our analysis of the artist’s experiments, including those with the sound of a traditional instrument, is based on a number of other scientific and literary theories, all expressing the inaccuracy or exhaustion of the idea of time. These include science-fiction stories, dissertations on experiments with sound and aural illusions, and studies on such museum concepts as the Encyclopedic Palace. An echo of the Venetian installation used as a tool for accumulating energy can also be found in The Voices of Time by J. G. Ballard which offers an entropic vision of the “last man on Earth” collecting so-called terminal documents. The aforementioned compositional tools used by Smoleński are also typical for Samuel Beckett for whom the notion of time is one of the key issues, both in terms of text and plot structure. Thus, repetition, change and non-accomplishment, primary features of Beckett’s work, are characteristics that also to be found in Smoleński’s works. Both in Beckett’s plays and in Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More, time is regarded as a persistence whose intervals and dimensions, generally known as the past, present and future, merge into one with time itself becoming, in the words of the playwright, “a monster that both condemns and redeems.”

The full version of the exhibition’s title taken from the book of Alexei Yurchak: Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More. The Last Soviet Generation (Princeton University Press, 2005).
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: labiennale

Konrad Smoleński (1977). Absolwent Akademii Sztuk Pięknych w Poznaniu (2002). Prezentował swoje prace w ramach wielu wystaw m.in. w Ludwig Museum, Budapeszt; Pinchuk Art Center, Kijów; Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen; Waterside Contemporary, Londyn; Offen auf AEG, Norymberga; Palais de Tokyo, Paryż; Zachęta — Narodowa Galeria Sztuki, Warszawa. Stypendysta Ministerstwa Kultury i Dziedzictwa Narodowego RP (2000). Laureat Nagrody Fundacji Deutsche Bank — Spojrzenia (2011). Mieszka i pracuje w Warszawie i Bernie.
www.konradsmolenski.com

Realizacja w Pawilonie Polskim stanowi kontynuację poszukiwań artysty, który konsekwentnie bada przepływy i erupcje energii. Tym samym jego poprzednie prace stanowić mogą kontekst dla zrozumienia Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More.

Stanowiące trzon instalacji Konrada Smoleńskiego dwa spiżowe instrumenty, wykonane tradycyjną metodą ręczną, zachowały nieco „prymitywny”, nieoszlifowany charakter związany z ich rzemieślniczym rodowodem. Ulokowane na osi budynku dzwony, podobnie jak wtórujące im rzędy szerokopasmowych głośników i dwie naprzeciwległe ściany blaszanych szafek, służą za modelowy przykład systemu stereofonicznego. Forma poszczególnych części wydaje się wprawdzie znajoma, czego nie można już powiedzieć o ich wzajemnych relacjach w tej stosunkowo niewielkiej przestrzeni. Szczególnie nie na miejscu wydają się być w tym układzie idiofony, których nie zwykło się oglądać w ludzkim wymiarze, gdyż z reguły zawieszone są wysoko ponad linią wzroku. Otwarta pozostaje też kwestia przeznaczenia dwóch setek niewielkich, metalowych drzwiczek, których rozmiar, a co za tym idzie wygląd, jest na tyle uniwersalny, że kojarzyć się może z co najmniej kilkoma rodzajami przestrzeni publicznej i przynależnych im funkcji. Wszystkie składowe pełnią równoważną rolę w tym zarówno wizualnym, jak i audialnym układzie. W stworzonej przez Smoleńskiego kompozycji na te elementy nagrany w czasie rzeczywistym dźwięk tradycyjnego instrumentu zostaje przetworzony, opóźniony i retransmitowany, na zmianę z wydobywającym się z monumentalnych głośników jednostajnym dronem, by na koniec wybrzmieć poprzez metalowe struktury zintegrowane z architekturą pawilonu.

Działanie prezentowanej w Wenecji rzeźby dźwiękowej jest oparte głównie na manipulacji tonem uderzeniowym dzwonu — instrumentu, który obecny od wieków w kulturze, odpowiada m.in. za wyznaczanie rytmu życia zarówno doczesnego, jak i „wiecznego”. Przetwarzając to znajome brzmienie, Smoleński zmienia jego znaczenie: pełnemu różnorodnych treści dźwiękowi nadaje abstrakcyjną częstotliwość, która wydaje się pozbawiona konotacji. W uwolnieniu sygnału od jego źródła posiłkuje się również jego opóźnianiem i rewerberacją. Akumulacja fali akustycznej nadaje dźwiękowi masę podczas emisji w eter, która oddziałuje bezpośrednio na wszystkie podmioty i przedmioty, które znajdą się w pobliżu instalacji. Nie ma znaczenia charakter obiektu, przez które przenika sygnał akustyczny, gdyż wydaje się, że zdolny jest poruszyć molekuły ciał ożywionych i nieożywionych z tą samą mocą.

Instalacja w Pawilonie Polskim stanowi kontynuację dotychczasowych poszukiwań twórcy, który, od przeszło dekady aktywnie działając w obszarze sztuk wizualnych, w centrum swoich zainteresowań stawia dźwięk. Realizacje artysty łączą w sobie punkrockową estetykę z precyzją i elegancją typową dla minimalizmu. Smoleński, korzystając zarówno z tradycyjnych, jak i konstruowanych samodzielnie obiektów dźwiękowych, bada z ich pomocą przepływy i działanie energii. Eksplorując możliwości energii elektrycznej, fal dźwiękowych i systemów nagłośnienia, manipuluje między innymi znaczeniami, jakie zwykle przypisujemy przedmiotom związanym z kulturą rockową.

Poszukiwania Smoleńskiego i zabiegi, którym poddaje on wykorzystane w ramach Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More „instrumenty”, przywodzą na myśl wizję iluzoryczności czasu współczesnego brytyjskiego fizyka teoretycznego Juliana Barboura. Twierdzi on między innymi, że czas nie odgrywa tak ważnej roli, jak zwykło się uważać, i roztacza wizję bezczasowego wszechświata, w którym jedną z kluczowych kategorii jest teraźniejszość rozumiana jako trójwymiarowa migawka, a chronologiczne porządkowanie zdarzeń wynika jedynie z rejestrowania przez nas szeregów różnych „teraz”. Czas jest więc, zdaniem Barboura, zaledwie poczuciem czasowości, wzmacnianym przez tzw. „kapsuły czasu” — zapisy tego, co uważamy za istniejące w przeszłości.

Rozważania nad zabiegiem, któremu Smoleński poddaje m.in. dźwięk tradycyjnego instrumentu, odczytywane mogą być, obok hipotezy Barboura, ponadto poprzez co najmniej kilka współczesnych tekstów literackich i teorii naukowych, dla których wspólne jest przekonanie o nieścisłości lub wyczerpaniu pojęcia czasu. Są wśród nich opowiadania science-fiction, opracowania z zakresu eksperymentów i iluzji dźwiękowych, jak i koncepcje dotyczące funkcjonowania instytucji muzealnych w rodzaju Pałacu Encyklopedycznego. Echo weneckiej instalacji jako narzędzia służącego akumulacji energii odnaleźć również możemy w entropicznym scenariuszu Głosów czasu J. G. Ballarda, gdzie tworzeniem kolekcji tzw. ostatecznych dokumentów zajmuje się „ostatni” człowiek na ziemi. Opisane powyżej stosowane przez Smoleńskiego narzędzia kompozycyjne odpowiadają też tym typowym dla Samuela Becketta, w którego twórczości problematyka czasu stanowi jedno z kluczowych zagadnień. Pojawia on się zarówno w konstrukcji tekstów, jak i składowych fabuły jego dramatów, głównie poprzez — obecne również u Smoleńskiego — powtórzenie, zmianę i niedokonanie. Czas Becketta podobnie jak czas Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More jest trwaniem, którego interwały i wymiary, znane jako przeszłość, teraźniejszość i przyszłość, stapiają się w jedno, a sam czas, jak twierdzi dramaturg, to „monstrum, które potępia i zbawia zarazem”.

Tytuł wystawy został zapożyczony z tytułu książki Alexeia Yurchaka: Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More. The Last Soviet Generation (Princeton University Press, 2005).
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: lespressesdureel

Konrad Smoleński (né en 1977, vit et travaille à Varsovie et à Berne) travaille dans les champs de la photographie, de l’art vidéo, de l’installation, de la performance et du happening. Figure de la scène musicale indépendante polonaise, membre du groupe Panerstwo et du collectif Pink Punk, Konrad Smoleński réalise des installations audio-visuelles spectaculaires et radicales qui conjuguent une esthétique post-punk et la précision et l’élégance de l’art minimal, avec lesquelles il expérimente les relations entre son et objet, son et image, performeur et spectateur.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: dewemait

Due campane in bronzo, al centro del Padiglione Polonia, limitate entro due muri di casse acustiche, compongono l’installazione sonora Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More di Konrad Smolenski. L’opera si completa con il suono che le campane stesse emettono, registrato e diffuso dalle casse a basse vibrazioni. La melodia che si ripete è una composizione per campane tradizionali in bronzo; ciò che la rende unica e mistica è il suono riprodotto dalle casse e riflesso da altri elementi acustici. Il risultato è un’illusione sonora.