La La La Human Steps

New Work
Mi Deng and Jason Shipley-Holmes perform

source: theguardian

he Canadian choreographer Édouard Lock formed La La La Human Steps in 1980 as a vehicle for his high-energy dance works. Intense, precise and often confrontational pieces such as Lily Marlène dans la jungle and Human Sex drew on sources as diverse as animation (Lock studied film before launching himself as a choreographer) and competitive sport. His muse was the androgynous Louise Lecavalier, known for her aggressive style and awesome horizontal air-turns. As one critic observed, he threw his dancers on stage “like missiles”.

By the late 1980s Lock was being commissioned by classical ballet companies, and pointe work joined his armoury of effects, often performed with extreme velocity. His reputation built and the awards mounted – a Bessie and a Canadian knighthood among them. A quarter of a century later, however, the schtick is beginning to wear a little thin. His new work, coyly entitled New Work and set to a fine composition by Gavin Bryars, incorporates all the familiar tropes. Breakneck-pace pointe work, disorienting cuts between lighting sources, an air of self-conscious alienation. The skill is undoubted, particularly that of lead dancer Talia Evtushenko, but the attitudinising tiresome. Dressing your female dancers in revealing leotards and your men in black-on-black designer suits and cryptic expressions is more than a little passé, except possibly at Nederlands Dans Theater.

The duets appear to reveal the same mind-set. The vulpine Evtushenko, although an accomplished technician and a past mistress of Lock’s supercharged style, is never an autonomous being, but is always manipulated, shaped and turned by men. Bryars’s score samples elements of Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas, so it may be that the duets are reflective of the Carthaginian queen’s helpless and despairing fury at her lover’s departure, but if so, this is far from obvious.

New Work’s rewards are few. The hard, constantly shifting downlighting eliminates the dancers’ facial expressions, and for most of the piece their faces too. The classically derived choreography is undistinguished, and because it’s limited to steps which can be performed at manic speed, highly repetitive. At intervals two screens are lowered, and we watch minimalist films of a younger and an older woman sitting in chairs. Who are they? Is the older woman actually the younger one made up to look twice her age? Do we care? The dancers and the onstage musicians work hard, but by the end they, and we, are still mostly in the dark.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: latimesblogslatimes

“Dancing in the dark” would make an impeccable subtitle for Édouard Lock’s provocative “New Work,” which had its U.S. debut at the Irvine Barclay Theatre on Thursday night.

The ultra-athletic artists of Lock’s company, La La La Human Steps, whirled, kicked and wriggled at highest velocity. This iconoclastic style has brought both celebrity and notoriety to the Montreal choreographer. In “New Work,” Lock has gone one step further, designing a nearly dark lighting scheme, brightened only by precisely angled overhead and side spotlights. The dancers’ faces and bodies were obscured, allowing Lock to sculpt a fragmented stage of blurred bodies. It’s an ironic twist that in cloaking his repetitive and gestural ballet language, Lock takes it to a more satisfying and nuanced level.

For more than 30 years, Lock has been re-writing the rules of contemporary dance and forcing audiences to revise how they see and register movement.

In “New Work,” the viewer was best served by looking at the bodies’ wavering outlines, the women in strapless black leotards and tights, the men in black suits (though sometimes shirtless; costumes by Liz Vandal). Observe the strobe-like effect created by the ferociously waving arms and flexed hands, or the reflections that bounced off the ballerinas’ skin and pink toe shoes. Notice the exaggerated contours of sinewy muscles.

But it was not purely design-heavy tableaux. Lock sprinkled suggestive shards of love-sick narrative from Henry Purcell’s “Dido and Aeneas” and Christoph Gluck’s “Orfeo ed Euridice.” The extraordinarily quick and strong Talia Evtushenko struck angry and despairing poses, alternately kissing and pummeling her partner, then drawing in her arms to spin like an ice skater. The leggy Mi Deng was supported through deeply leaning arabesques, by partners who rarely revealed themselves.
Four onstage musicians, meanwhile, gave gorgeous lilt to composer Gavin Bryars’ stately chamber melodies, a sonic torch that pierced the chaos and guided us to the end. Lock’s film sequences, however, which paired women young and old, were stagey and pretentious.

At 85 minutes, “New Work” was just long enough; Lock’s style still contains its own constraints. Crown the 11 dancers as heroes, though, for selflessly executing technical marvels that were difficult to fully observe. The ancients would have been admiring.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: madridorg

Una nueva creación que marca el 30 aniversario de La La La Human Steps.

La técnica de ballet acelerada, precisa, y al servicio de la narrativa deconstruida a partir de dos óperas emblemáticas. Ritmo febril y lenguaje gestual, que trata sobre dos trágicas historias de amor: Dido y Eneas de Purcell, y Orfeo y Eurídice de Gluck. Dos obras diferentes por su compositor, época y tema, pero que tejen una historia sobre la sombra y el final del amor, más que sobre la fase romántica. Una danza compleja ritmada por micro momentos que unen las dos óperas en una continua oda sobre la partitura de Gavin Bryars para piano, chelo, viola y saxofón, interpretada en directo por un cuarteto.

Sobre la compañía.
La La La Human Steps fue fundada en 1980 después de tres semanas de actuaciones en el teatro l´Eskabel del distrito de St-Henri de Montreal, lo que llevó la compañía a The Kitchen en la ciudad de Nueva York, epicentro de la danza contemporánea en ese momento. Desde entonces La La La Human Steps se ha convertido en una de las compañías de danza más reconocidas del mundo, gracias al lenguaje coreográfico único que ha desarrollado y reinventado desde sus comienzos.

La compañía exige que sus bailarines se redefinan constantemente, se cuestionen y renueven ellos mismos, para sacar a la luz actuaciones que van desde el extremo a la lírica.

La compañía de Montreal ha colaborado con instituciones y artistas tan diversos y eclécticos como la Ópera de París y Frank Zappa.

En los últimos 30 años La La La Human Steps ha encargado trabajos originales a compositores alternativos y contemporáneos como Rober Racine, West India Company, Einstürzende Neubauten y David Van Tieghem, Iggy Pop, Shellac of North America, My Bloody Valentine, Gavin Bryars y David Lang, ganador del premio Pulitzer.

Desde Human Sex en 1985, la compañía ha estado a la vanguardia de la escena de danza internacional, girando con cada producción durante dos años, en las mayores capitales de Europa, Asia y América.

El fundador de La La La Human Steps, Director artístico y coreógrafo Edouard Lock, comenzó su carrera coreográfica con 20 años, creando piezas del 1974 a 1978 para Le Groupe Nouvelle Aire y en 1979 para Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montreal.

A lo largo de los años el Sr. Lock ha sido invitado a crear para algunas de las compañías más importantes del mundo, incluyendo el Ballet de la Ópera de París, el Het Nationale Ballet de Holanda y el Nederlands Dans Theater. Sus trabajos han obtenido muchos galardones, incluyendo el premio coreográfico Chalmers (1982, 2001), el New York Dance and Performance Award o el Bessie (1986); el premio Denise-Pelletier (2001), el premio del National Arts Centre (2001) y el premio coreográfico Benois 2003 en Moscú por AndréAuria creado para el Ballet de la Ópera de París en octubre de 2002. En 2010, recibió el Performing Arts Award del Gobernador General por toda su realización artística. Ese mismo año fue beneficiario del premio Canada Council for the Arts Molson.

La Universidad de Quebec en Montreal le galardonó como doctor Honoris causa (2010).

Co-concibió y fue el director artístico de la gira mundial de David Bowie, Sonido y Visión (1990). También ha colaborado con Frank Zappa en el concierto del Yellow Shark junto al Ensemble Modern de Alemania.

Invitado por Robert Carsen y la Ópera de París, el Sr. Lock coreografió la producción de Les Boréades en 2003, interpretado por La La La Human Steps en el Palais Garnier.

El Sr. Lock es Caballero de la Orden de Quebec desde 2001, Oficial de la Orden de Canadá desde 2002.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: italicch

Sous la direction artistique de Frédéric Flamand, actuellement à la tête du Ballet National de Marseille, le Festival de danse de Cannes s’est tenu en novembre dernier et avait pour thématique “Les Nouvelles Mythologies”. L’occasion pour le public de découvrir et admirer les performances des danseurs de France et d’ailleurs. En ouverture, le chorégraphe canadien Edouard Lock présentait avec sa compagnie La La La Human Steps, “New Work”. Tout simplement époustouflant.

Pour marquer le trentième anniversaire de sa compagnie, La La La Human Steps, Edouard Lock a créé New Work, une pièce inspirée de Didon et Enée de Purcell et Orphée et Euridipe de Gluck, deux opéras baroques.

Trois musiciens – violoncelliste, saxophoniste et altiste – accompagnent les danseurs sur une scène très dépouillée. L’éclairage y forme le décor principal, suivant les danseurs dans leurs mouvements. La performance très physique et complexe des danseurs impressionne. Tous formés au ballet, ils se déplacent à une vitesse qui paraît défier les limites humaines, alternant vrilles et pointes.

Dans une interview en 2003 à Voir, Edouard Lock explique ainsi son intérêt pour cette forme de danse: “En fait, ce que j’aime des pointes, c’est le fait qu’elles soulignent le côté graphique du corps. La pointe définit le corps d’une façon linéaire. Une certaine verticalité est aussi associée à la position pointe.” Effectivement, les silouhettes des danseurs, vêtus de noir, semblent s’étirer sans fin, entre puissance et élégance.

Solos, duos et trios se succèdent, entrecoupés de projections de film en noir et blanc sur grand écran qui questionnent le temps qui passe et le vieillissement qui marquent nos corps et nos traits.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: tollhausde

Seit drei Jahrzehnten setzt die kanadische Tanztruppe La La La Human Steps um den Choreografen Édouard Lock Maßstäbe und weist einer ganzen Tanzgeneration den Weg. Ihr akrobatischer Ansatz lässt dem Publikum weltweit den Atem stocken und machte die Sprünge von Locks langjähriger Frontfrau Louise Lecavalier legendär. Mit maximaler Energie und vollem Risiko tanzte sich La La La Human Steps zu Weltruhm. Lock arbeitete mit David Bowie, Frank Zappa und dem Ballett der Pariser Oper zusammen. Ihre Sneakers haben die kanadischen Kulttänzer längst gegen Spitzenschuhe getauscht und Édouard Lock beweist, dass Tanz auch dann zeitgemäß sein kann, wenn man ihn auf Spitze stellt. Die Ästhetik der Ballettromantik kontern die Kanadier mit virtuosem Hochgeschwindigkeitstanz. Locks schlicht “New Work” betiteltes jüngstes Werk verschmilzt zwei tragische Liebesgeschichten der Opernbühne miteinander: Dido und Aeneas und Orpheus und Eurydike. Klassische Schrittfolgen kombiniert Lock mit atemberaubenden Beschleunigungen. Die eigens für das Stück entstandene Musik stammt vom renommierten britischen Komponisten Gavin Bryars.