LARS VON TRIER

لارس فون ترير
拉斯·冯·特里尔
라스 폰 트리에
לארס פון טרייר
ラース·フォン·トリアー
Ларс фон Триер

melancholia

source: cinema-scope

“The purpose of provocations is to get people to think,” declared Lars von Trier in Stig Björkman’s documentary Tranceformer—A Portrait of Lars von Trier (1997). By those standards, the provocation von Trier masterminded at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, which, in reference to the concomitant Dominique Strauss-Kahn affair that monopolized the television sets in the Palais, metastasized into what Manohla Dargis termed “L’affaire LVT,” failed miserably. In the aftermath of von Trier’s rambling comic riff, which his publicist referred to as a “Lenny Bruce-style routine which bombed,” neither the aging Danish enfant terrible nor the festival which feigned outrage at his remarks managed to appear either credible or dignified.

Von Trier has always had a rather tenuous relationship to public relations. His so-called “provocations” are usually promotional tools that toy with self-sabotage, and it’s certainly no coincidence that Justine (eventual Cannes Best Actress winner Kirsten Dunst), the protagonist of his new film Melancholia, is employed at a PR firm. In the farcical pseudo-controversy initiated at a dull point in the Melancholia press conference, von Trier and the Cannes brass performed what began to seem like preordained roles with varying degrees of ineptitude. Von Trier highlighted his buffoonish tendencies by responding to a question about his German roots by impishly claiming that he felt slightly “sympathetic” to Hitler and ribbing Susanne Bier, the Danish-Jewish director he once employed at Zentropa, his production company. The questioner, however, appeared to be referencing an interview von Trier gave to Film, the magazine of the Danish Film Institute, in which he confessed to having “a weakness for the Nazi aesthetic.”

Content to dig himself into a hole for the delectation of the international press, the garrulous director insisted, “But come on, I’m not for the Second World War…I am of course very much for the Jews. No, not too much because the Israelis are a pain in the ass…OK, I’m a Nazi.” Bizarrely enough, Gilles Jacob and Thierry Frémaux managed to anoint von Trier with a peculiar sort of gravitas by declaring him “persona non grata.” During a festival that honoured Jafar Panahi and Mohammad Rasoulof, bona fide Iranian non-persons, the ostracized Dane, despite his mediocre film and frivolous statements, became a cause célèbre in his own right, at least as far as the editors of certain disgruntled journalists were concerned. (Like many journalists covering Cannes, I was urged to report on the uproar; the day after the initial brouhaha, I showed up at von Trier’s luxury hotel in nearby Mougins where he spouted a series of ritualized apologies to successive roundtables.)

If anything serious can be extracted from these sophomoric hijinks, it might be a discussion of the political legacy of German Romanticism, which von Trier impetuously linked to a fascist tradition. Before taking a stab at that task, however, it needs to be said that von Trier probably doesn’t have a genuinely political bone in his body, and is certainly no more a putative “fascist” director than he was a supposed “leftist,” or “anti-American” director at the time that Dogville spurred on a similarly unilluminating contretemps. Of course, ever since the release of his first feature The Element of Crime, von Trier has paid explicit homage to Andrei Tarkovsky, and the placement of some of the most famous leitmotifs of Wagner’s Tristan and Isolde alongside some vaguely Tarkovskian imagery in the “overture” to Melancholia makes one wonder if the melancholy Dane is aiming at some hybrid version of conservative modernism—perhaps a fusion of Tarkovsky and Syberberg at his most florid.

The problem is that, despite his professed admiration for modernist masters such as Tarkovsky and Antonioni, von Trier will always be the most vacuous kind of postmodernist. A talent for visual pastiche served von Trier well in early features such as The Element of Crime (1984), an enjoyable assemblage of noirish themes with a strikingly expressionist visual palette. But his efforts to tackle Big Themes in subsequent films consistently degenerate into artistic elephantiasis. Melancholia’s grandiloquent “overture” is a case in point. Although there’s certainly superficial virtuosity in the digitized tributes to the Pre-Raphaelites, Gregory Crewdson, and Brueghel that set the stage for the apocalyptic proceedings, the overall achievement seems to be more akin to a superlative job of photoshopping than anything approximating the more nuanced artistic reveries of Tarkovsky or Antonioni.

Truth be told, the best thing about Melancholia is its title. In an era where pop therapy abounds, true melancholy and its affinity to beauty needs to be rehabilitated—and of course differentiated from the more banal categories of “mental illness” and “depression.” In a pivotal phase of German Romanticism exemplified by Novalis’ poetry, the quintessentially melancholy category of “longing” is linked with a quest for the “unattainable.” Yet there’s also a tangibly utopian element to Novalis’ melancholy, personified by his dictum, “All representation rests on making present that which is not present.” Or as Max Blechman puts it in his essay “The Revolutionary Dream of Early German Romanticism,” “the Romantics’ pantheistic faith points to how art and religion are fundamentally one and the same activity. For is not art the desire to see the real in the ideal, to enliven the ideal behind the real, to transform unconscious idealism into conscious idealism—and is this not done through faith in the ideal?”

Despite von Trier’s fetishization of certain residual elements of late Romanticism—particularly Wagner’s concern with the transcendent power of fusing love and death—there is none of the communitarian fervour that imbued the work of political Romantics such as Blake and Shelley in Melancholia. All that is left in von Trier’s bloated take on The Day the Earth Caught Fire (1961) is facile cynicism. Melancholia’s central narrative kernel in the film’s first part—the fractious preparations for Justine’s marriage to Michael (Alexander Skarsgård), her boss’ son—comes off as an inferior variation on themes culled from Thomas Vinterberg’s Dogma film The Celebration (1998). After this monotonous rehash of dysfunctional family dynamics, the film swerves into more fanciful territory as Justine feuds with her sister Claire (Charlotte Gainsbourg) and contemplates the impending collision of “Planet Melancholia” with Earth. Claire’s husband, John (Kiefer Sutherland), a reasonable type who doubts that the end of the world is near, is lampooned as a rationalist stooge.

A well-known depressive himself, von Trier apparently identifies with the plight of the lugubrious and sexually promiscuous Justine. But, despite his efforts to create a heroine who is not a masochistic victim (i.e., the protagonists of Breaking the Waves [1996], Dancer in the Dark [2000], and Dogville) Justine’s clichéd closeness to nature, especially horses, makes her, in the final analysis, just another stock female character.

Von Trier’s parody of the Wagnerian Gesamtkunstwerk in Melancholia, as well as his ostensibly tongue-in-cheek obeisance to a “Nazi aesthetic,” also go a long way towards contextualizing the disparity between his appropriation of Romanticism and the revolutionary tradition of the 18th-century Romantics. As Theodor Adorno observes in In Search of Wagner, by the time an insurrectionary Romanticism congealed into the Wagnerian Gesamtkunstwerk in the 19th century, a retrograde emphasis on the poet/composer as individualist seer, instead of a prophet of community, became evident. Adorno subtly demonstrates how Wagner’s superficially avant-gardist ideal actually became commodified and foreshadowed the 20th-century phenomenon of the “culture industry.”

On a more pedestrian level, similar contradictions have fuelled von Trier’s career. His seemingly anti-bourgeois provocations, whether deemed “progressive” or “reactionary,” merely serve to conveniently situate his brand of art cinema within the confines of a profitable, if prestigious, tributary of the global culture industry. The fact that the world ends with a pleasurable whimper in Melancholia is highly appropriate; even the final conflagration turns out to be an over-hyped non-event. If Wagner’s gorgeous music can still trigger at least a simulation of ecstasy, von Trier’s films, even when propped up with the trappings of scandal, can only inspire a hearty shrug.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: obrazprzejsciowy

Lars znowu zaskoczył! Tak w jednym zdaniu mógłbym podsumować ostanie dokonanie duńskiego reżysera. Jeżeli von Trier robi film o końcu świata, to ciężko sobie wyobrazić jaki następny temat wpadnie mu do głowy! Bynajmniej pomysłów mu ostatnio nie brakuje, a osadzona w konwencji onirycznego melodramatu katastroficznego historia dwóch sióstr w najnowszym filmie – Melancholia jest tego najlepszym dowodem. W to, że wyobraźnię duński reżyser posiada, nie należy chyba wątpić. Realizacje tych pomysłów bywają raz lepsze, innym razem gorsze. Tym razem jest wręcz świetnie, bo reżyser cały czas artystycznie się rozwija. Sprawdzone i udane moim zdaniem rozwiązania estetyczne z Antychrysta von Trier dopracował , rozszerzył, wzbogacił i wcielił do swojej Melancholii z efektem co najmniej rewelacyjnym, a czasemi nawet zapierającym dech. O tak, już dawno nie czułem w kinie tego przyjemnego ciężaru w klatce piersiowej.

Ciężko znaleźć w tym filmie coś słabego. Nawet chwilami próbujące osunąć się w patos oniryczne obrazy ostatecznie się bronią i nie przekraczają cienkiej granicy kiczu, która niestety została aż dwa razy przekroczona w poprzednim jego filmie. Swoją drogą pomysł na film katastroficzny o końcu świata, bez walących się budynków, pękających ulic i mostów okazał się realizacją bardzrdziej niż udanym. W spokojnej i powolnej historii dwóch nadwrażliwych sióstr oraz małych rodzinnych i ludzkich dramatów Trier przedstawił istne trzęsienie ziemi a napięcie temu towarzyszące, położyłoby na łopatki nie jeden koniec świata zafundowany nam przez Hollywood. Ten film trzeba zobaczyć!
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: hitonhyvatsumpitblogspot

Vuoden odotetuin elokuva, ohjaajalta joka on tällä hetkellä kaikista mielenkiintoisin koko maailmassa. Kovat on lähtökohdat. Lars von Trier on aina tehnyt elokuviaan sykleissä, taiteellisissa parin kolmen elokuvan kausissa. Taustalla on Eurooppa-trilogia, Breaking the Wavesin, Idioottien ja Dancer in the Darkin muodostama invaliditeettiä käsittelevää trilogia ja Amerikka-trilogia, joka ei kylläkään saanut suunnitteilla ollutta päätösosaansa Wasingtonia silloin kun oli tarkoitus. Se ei ole ainut kesken jäänyt projekti, sillä myös Dimension 1991-2024 jäi peruuttamattomasti ja hyvin harmillisesti toteuttamatta loppuun. Siinä von Trierillä oli tarkoitus kuvata vuosittain kolmen minuutin pätkä elokuvaa 33 vuoden ajan. Niin järjestelmällinen, mutta niin keskittymishäiriöinen mies. Silti valmis lopputulos on aina maltillisuudessaankin timanttia.

Lars von Trierillä on jatkuva into toteuttaa visioitaan vaihtelevin inspiraationlähtein. Tällä hetkellä vallitseva kausi alkoi Amerikka-trilogian päätösosan taka-alalle sivunnut Antichrist. Ohjaajalla tuli selvästi tarve tehdä juuri se elokuva, jo itsensä takia. Käynnissä oleva kausi on vahvasti venäläisohjaaja Andrei Tarkovskin viitoittama ja elokuvallinen kauneus, kerronta ja ilmapiiri ovat samantyylistä kuin esikuvallaan. Tyylillisten seikkojen lisäksi von Trier on heittänyt sekaan myös selkeämpiä yhtymäkohtia. Yksi niistä on Pieter Bruegelin maalaaman taulun Metsästäjiä talvimaisemissa (1565) käyttö, taulu esitti tärkeää roolia Tarkovskin elokuvassa Solaris (1972), joka onkin monella tapaa läheinen vastine Melancholialle. Kummatkin ovat nimellisesti tieteiskuvitelmia, kyseisen genren ollen kuitenkin totaalisen toissijainen asianhaara, elokuvien muodostuessa syviksi ihmismielen tutkielmiksi.

Lars von Trier on hyvin epävarma itsestään ja tekemisistään. Hänellä oli visio elokuvasta joka olisi kuin tunnetila, syvä sukellus saksalaiseen romantiikkaan. Kun elokuva oli valmis, ohjaaja tuntui ikäänkuin vasta silloin havahtuneen unesta ja näkevänsä teoksen ensimmäistä kertaa. Von Trier pelkäsi että se on liian kiva elokuva, että se ei olekaan tarpeeksi outo. No ehkei elokuva ole ainekaan kiva, sanotaanko että kivempi, noin nyt von Trierin mittakaavassa. Outo se on oikeastaan vain juurikin sopivasti. Golf-radan “yhdeksästoista reikä” on ainut yksityiskohta jonka itse laskisin vähän huvittavuuden rajalla kiikkuvaksi erikoisuudentavoitteluksi, mutta menköön kun kaikki muu on niin taiten rakenneltua.

Antichristissa ei voinut olla putoamatta sen luomista halkeamista (…) Melancholia taas on niin loppuun asti hiottu että sen pinnalla voi lautailla läpi elokuvan, sisältö on tuon sulavan pinnan alla ja sinne päästäksesi sinun täytyy katsoa päällä olevan kerroksen läpi. – Lars von Trier

Duh. Elokuva on nätti kuin mikä ja jokaikinen kohtaus on täyttä vontrieriä elokuvan kuitenkin poiketen kerrontatavaltaan todella paljon Antichristista. Siinä missä Antichrist tosiaan imaisi heti täysin sisään ja potki läpi elokuvan juuri siinä ja heti, Melancholia vain on ja huokuu, antaen itsestään sillä hetkellä vain osan ja jättäen lopun kytemään päivä- tai viikkokausiksi. Eipä siinä, ei se Antichristkaan lähtenyt mielestä yhtään sen herkemmin, mutta sen kovimman shokkiarvon koki juuri elokuvaa katsoessa, Melancholia kun vain kasvaa ja kasvaa kun se on jo pois silmistä. Suurin shokkiarvo onkin se ettei katsojaa shokeeratakkaan oletetulla tavalla.

Nättien kuvien ja silkinsileän kuoren alla sitten kuohuu. Von Trier on oppinut hieman pidättäytymistä ja ahdistavuuden olettaisi vain kasvavan sen myötä. Se ei välttämättä kuitenkaan kasva, se vain muuttaa muotoaan pinnalla tihkuvasta alitajuiseksi. Elokuva on jaettu kahteen osaan ja kummassakin tarkastellaan kahden siskoksen pelkoja ja pelkäämättömyyttä. Kirsten Dunst tekee kieltämättä elämänsä roolisuorituksen masentuneena ja kyynisenä Justinena, joka viettää hääpäiväänsä vaikka on täysin eristäytynyt kaikista ympärillään olevista ihmisistä, perheensä ja pomon lisäksi myös tulevasta miehestään. Charlotte Gainsbourg taas on näennäisen vahvana tapahtumien järjestelijänä, hyväntahtoisena ja kuoleman pelkoisena siskona täydellinen vastapari Dunstille. Kuten von Trierin elokuvissa poikkeuksetta, uskon joka ikinen hetki Dunstin ja Gainsbourgin olevan juuri ne henkilöt, joita he esittävät. Lars von Trier on poikkeuksellinen henkilöohjaaja vaille vertaistaan. Melancholia ei ole enempää eikä vähempää kuin taas yksi ajaton helmi aiempien von Trierin elokuvien jatkoksi.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: filmosaure

Boudé au profit de The Tree of Life, Melancholia (probablement sanctionné par les propos polémiques de son auteur) se contente du Prix d’interprétation féminine au festival de Cannes (largement mérité). Où Terrence Malick nous imposait un chaos de plans magnifiques, certes, mais inintéressants au possible, et l’irritation d’un film dépourvu de coordination scénaristique, Lars Von Trier a sculpté un petit bijou ; une perle noire, non exempte de défauts, mais bouleversante de par sa beauté et par la gracilité des interprétations.

Que ceux qui n’ont pas apprécié sa dernière œuvre, Antichrist, se rassurent : celle-ci se révèle infiniment plus poétique, à la frontière du divertissement et de l’œuvre d’art. Le réalisateur n’est ici en aucun cas misogyne, comme pouvaient l’affirmer les détracteurs d’Antichrist ; Melancholia est porteur du destin de deux femmes, toutes deux magnifiées de façon différente, toutes deux touchantes, fortes et fragiles.
Structuré en deux parties, le film se fait tout d’abord témoin des langueurs de Justine (Kirsten Dunst), jeune mariée confrontée à ses états d’âme. Après un prologue alternant de nombreuses scènes, somptueuses de lenteur et d’émotion, qui trouveront pour la plupart leur écho à la toute fin du film, l’on est transporté dans la fête de mariage de Justine, organisée par sa sœur Claire (Charlotte Gainsbourg). Sur fond de drames familiaux, Justine subit l’égoïsme agressif de sa mère (une Charlotte Rampling génialissime et détestable), qui déteste les mariages, et l’indifférence libertine de son père qui appelle tout le monde Betty, y compris sa propre fille, qui a besoin de lui.

Peu à peu, le bonheur ambiant se dissout et la fête se transforme en doux cauchemar, alimenté par les dérives de Justine, qui catharsise son mal-être par la fuite et l’indifférence, et peine de plus en plus à cacher la dépression qui l’habite. Rêveuse, gracieuse, elle trouve écho dans la Blanche Ophélie de Shakespeare, demoiselle noyée dans son désespoir (parallèle rappelé dans l’affiche du film, un des plans du début, et un des livres de la bibliothèque choisis par Justine). Kirsten Dunst est inoubliable en Ophélie, et Lars Von Trier traduit avec une justesse incroyable les affres de la dépression, symbolisés par cette image seule et les dires de son héroïne : dans sa robe de mariée, elle tente d’avancée, incommodée et retenue par d’épais, répugnants fils de laine grisâtres lui retenant les pieds et s’emmêlant autour de ses jambes.

Melancholia, c’est donc cette maladie qui ronge Justine, mais c’est également le nom de cette planète en transit qui menace d’entrer en collision avec la Terre. Dans la deuxième partie, c’est sur la sœur, Claire, qu’est focalisée l’attention. Si terre à terre dans la première moitié, elle panique et révèle toute sa fragilité, inquiétée par cette planète malgré les dires des scientifiques qui affirment qu’il n’y a aucun risque tandis que Justine s’est complètement calmée : elle semble savoir quelque chose que personne d’autre ne sait et avoir accepté sa destinée avec une sorte de stoïcisme désabusé. Comme les chevaux qui se calment soudainement à l’approche de la fin, elle cesse ses comportements erratiques et se contente d’être présente, silencieuse, victime de la fatalité.
Les dernières minutes sont une explosion de beauté et d’intensité qui, portées par les notes de Wagner, nous laissent tremblants, un peu abîmés, toujours un peu prisonniers de l’univers particulier dont nous avons été les chanceux témoins.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: thisisjanewayne

Es regnet tote Vögel vom Himmel. Dann öffnet sie die Augen und ihr Blick ist irgendwie leer, irgendwie zornig und auch irgendwie müde. Müde vom Leben. Das blonde Haar, strähnig und nass, umrahmt die blassblaue Haut. Alles bewegt sich in Zeitlupe, so, als wollte man sie noch ein bisschen hinauszögern, diese Anspannung. Da rast ein leuchtender Planet auf die Erde zu und niemand schiebt sie zur Seite. Wagners Ouvertüre aus Tristan und Isolde ist jetzt auf dem Höhepunkt. Und dann ist alles strahlend hell, dann tief düster und ganz still. Hier geht gerade die Welt unter. Und wir sind mittendrin.

Es braucht nur ein Bisschen, eine Kleinigkeit, um die Ordnung in ein Chaos zu stürzen. Die überlange Limousine auf dem kurvenreichen Feldweg, die das Brautpaar nicht rechtzeitig zur Feier bringt. Die überforderte Braut, die während des Tortenanschnitts gerade ein Bad nimmt oder die hochzeitsfeindliche Mutter, die jeden Toast mit sarkastischen Kommentaren untermalt. Schon die Hochzeit ist dem Untergang geweiht. Claire (Charlotte Gainsbourg) ärgert das. Zusammen mit ihrem reichen Ehemann hat sie diese Hochzeit organisiert. Sie und Justine (Kirsten Dunst), die Braut, sind Schwestern. Sie verbindet zwei Elternteile, einige Gene und derselbe Stammbaum. Und so sind wir bereits am Ende der Liste mit den Gemeinsamkeiten angekommen. „Wie ich dich manchmal hasse, Justine.“

Justine nämlich ist anders. Während Claire so ziemlich alles geplant und jede Minute im Ablauf festgeschrieben hatte, ist es Justine, die sich aufgrund ihrer Depressionen einfach nicht auf dieses eigentlich freudige Spektakel einlassen kann. Der Brautstrauß, der über die nächste Braut im Bekanntenkreis entscheiden soll. Die Hochzeitstorte, die unbedingt gemeinsam vom Brautpaar angeschnitten werden muss. Sogar die Hochzeitsnacht, auf die ihr Ehemann nach der Feier so sehr drängt. All die Rituale sind ihr zuwider. Sie will ihre Ruhe, will allein sein mit sich und der Welt. Justine ist das Chaos. Das Chaos, das die Ordnung ihrer eigenen Hochzeit, ihrer eigenen Ehe zerstört. Und sie hat einen Mitstreiter. „Was ist das da für ein roter Stern?“

Während die Hochzeit nach und nach außer Plan gerät, wird auch die Erde und damit ihre Bewohner von etwas aus der Bahn geworfen, das sich vor den Blicken anderer eigentlich gut zu verstecken wusste. Der Planet Melancholia bewegt sich immer weiter in Richtung Erde. Faszination und Angst zugleich. Wie Melancholia den Menschen mit Hilfe ihrer Unsichtbarkeit eigentlich keine Probleme bereitet, so versucht auch Justine ihre Depression am Tag ihrer Hochzeit verdeckt zu halten. Dann wird sie getroffen, bricht in sich zusammen. Justine ist Melancholia. Und dann wird aus dem Bisschen, aus der Kleinigkeit etwas ganz Großes. Unberechenbar. „Das ist ein Planet, der hinter der Sonne versteckt war. Und jetzt fliegt er an uns vorbei.“

Ein warmes Bad wird zur Qual, ihr geliebter Hackbraten zu Müll in der Tonne, das Leben zur Tortur. Und auch Claire erscheint der Alltag unter dem sich nähernden Planeten immer schwerer. Sie hat Angst vor dem, was da kommt. Ihr Mann John (Kiefer Sutherland) versucht die Angst in Faszination zu verwandeln, sitzt mit ihrem gemeinsamen Sohn vor dem Teleskop und beobachtet begeistert die täglichen Bewegungen Melancholias. „Ich habe Angst vor diesem blöden Planeten.“ – „Er wird uns nicht treffen.“ – „Versprochen?“

Tatsächlich trifft er sie am geplanten Tag des Geschehens nicht. Claires Leben ist jetzt dennoch ein anderes. Je mehr Melancholia und damit das Ende der Welt sich ebendieser nähert, desto gelähmter wird sie. Justine aber ist plötzlich so klar und frei wie nie zuvor. Denn Melancholia kommt zurück. Melancholia hat sie nicht verlassen. „Die Welt ist böse. Keiner wird uns je vermissen.“

Dann ist der Anfang wieder das Ende. Aufgeteilt in eigentlich zwei Akte „Justine“ und „Claire“, ist es der Vorspann, das Ende der Welt, das ungenannt den dritten Akt bildet und so den Namen „Melancholia“ tragen müsste. Hier geht es weiter. Schnee, Hagel und Insekten, die sich ihren Weg aus dem Inneren an das Äußere der Erde bahnen. Melancholia gegen die Erde. Das Chaos gegen die Ordnung. Dann ist alles ganz weiß und dann ganz schwarz. Es ist vorbei. Erlösung.

Lars von Trier vereint in „Melancholia“ mit Liebe und Hass, Faszination und Angst, vor allem aber Ordnung und Chaos die wohl größten Gegensätze, die das Leben birgt. Gegensätze, die sich anziehen und abstoßen. – Und schafft damit ein zugleich beklemmendes und befreiendes Drama, in dem einmal nicht nur zwischenmenschliche Konstellationen ins Wanken geraten. Lars von Trier zeigt uns das Chaos in uns selbst. Denn “Melancholia” ist nicht nur ein Endzeitdrama, weil es um den Weltuntergang geht. Weil große Planeten auf die Erde rasen und einem bewusst wird, dass man doch nur ein ganz kleiner Teil im großen Ganzen ist. Vielmehr geht es um eine Gesellschaft, die selbst auf die Apokalypse zusteuert. Der Planet als Symbol dafür, dass es gar nicht so unbedeutend, gar nicht so klein und unwichtig ist, was da manchmal in jedem von uns passieren kann, sobald man sich in zu feste Ordnungen begibt. In zu feste Ordnungen gedrängt wird. Sobald die Schnüre so fest gezogen werden, dass das Atmen immer schwerer fällt. Dass sie dich beim Gehen hindern, weil sie sich um deine Beine geschlungen haben. Dann sucht es sich einen anderen Weg. “Mum, ich habe Angst. Ich habe Schwierigkeit, richtig zu gehen.” – “Aber du kannst doch noch wanken, Justine.”

Vereint wird jedoch noch viel mehr: Als Mitbegründer des Manifests Dogma 95 verschrieb sich Lars von Trier zu Anfang der – wie schon zur Nouvelle Vague oder dem Oberhausener Manifest – absolut realistischen Darstellung im Film, die sich vornehmlich durch die Kameraführung mit der Hand, dem strikten Einsatz natürlichen Lichts oder auch dem Verzicht von Spezialeffekten und Filtern auszeichnet. Mit „Antichrist“, seinem vorletzten, extrem kontrovers besprochenen Film, sollten diese Prinzipien jedoch nicht mehr vollkommen eingehalten werden: Künstliches Licht, Farbfilter und Zeitlupen dominierten in der Ästhetik und setzten sich somit vom Minimalismus seiner Vorgänger deutlich ab. Mit „Melancholia“ jedoch findet Lars von Trier einen Mittelweg und kombiniert Stilelemente der Dogma 95 mit denen seiner scheinbar aktuellen Linie. „Melancholia“ verbindet die wackelige Handkamera mit Standbildern und extremer Zeitlupe, verwendet in der Postproduktion Farbfilter und Farbsättigungen und setzt vor allem im Vorspann auf eine dramatische Musikuntermalung des Geschehens: Hier wird der Weltuntergang mit der Ouvertüre aus Wagners Tristan und Isolde eingeleitet. Die Mischung aus extrem theatralischer, pathetischer und dramatischer und wiederum natürlicher, schonungsloser und sprunghafter, ja fast elliptischer Kameraführung ist es, die diesen Film in seiner Ästhetik und Wirkung so besonders macht. So erinnern die bösen Szenen während der Hochzeitsfeier auch ganz bestimmt nicht zufällig an die des Dogma 95-Manifest-Films „Das Fest“ von Thomas Vinterberg.

Auch diesmal bedient sich der Däne einiger weiterer Zitate und Metaphern aus Kunst, Religion, Psychologie und Mythologie. So sind es neben den immer wiederkehrenden Motiven für die Gegensätzlichkeiten des Lebens vor allem die einprägsamen Kunstwerke, die er im Laufe des Films – mal mehr, mal weniger auffällig – präsentiert. Anstelle ein paar aufgeschlagener Seiten, auf denen die konstruktivistische Kunst Malevitschs (die man mit den Attributen Rationalität, Berechnung, Modernität durchaus in Verbindung bringen könnte) zu sehen sind, tauscht Justine am Abend ihrer Hochzeit in der Bibliothek die Präsentationsflächen durch einige andere: Caravaggios „David und Goliath“, Boschs „Weltgerichtstriptychon“ und vor allem John Everett Millais “Ophelia” (nach der gleichnamigen Figur aus Shakespeares „Hamlet“), das durch Kirsten Dunst während der Apokalypse wie in einem Tableau Vivant eins zu eins nachgestellt wird: Die perfekt geschmückte Braut in einem von Pflanzen gerahmten Flussbett dem Tod entgegen treibend.

So schön kann das Ende also aussehen. Wenn es soweit ist, dann wünsche auch ich mir diesen so verwirrenden aber großartigen Dänen herbei, der dann ein bisschen in die Gestaltung eingreift. In solch einer Schönheit lässt es sich doch versöhnlich Abschied nehmen. Apocalypse, please. Apocalypse made by Lars von Trier.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: cerdomorado

Se trata de un apocalíptico filme del polémico director danés, que regresa a la ciencia ficción de una forma muy elegante. Melancolía (Melancholia, Dinamarca-Suecia-Francia- Alemania, 2011) y es protagonizada por Kirsten Dunst quien se alzó con el premio a la mejor actriz en el Festival de Cannes 2011.

Von Trier, realiza un descarnado y lírico análisis del mundo y el alma donde confluyen la ciencia ficción y la piscología, todo ello bajo los acordes de Wagner y una estética que seduce los sentidos.

Melancolía

Melancholia (Dinamarca, Suecia, Francia, Alemania, 2011)
Género: Ciencia Ficción/Drama
Clasificación: C
Duración: 136 mins.
Dirección: Lars von Trier
Actuaciones: Kiefer Sutherland, Kirsten Dunst, John Hurt, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Charlotte Rampling, Alexander Skarsgard, Stellan Skarsgard

Sinopsis:

Justine (Kirsten Dunst) y Michael (Alexander Skarsgard) dan una suntuosa fiesta para celebrar su boda en casa de la hermana de la novia (Charlotte Gainsbourg) y de su marido (Kiefer Sutherland). Mientras tanto, el planeta Melancolía avanza hacia la Tierra en esta película psicológica y catastrofista de Lars von Trier.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: reelgr

Ο πλανήτης Melancholia συγκρούεται με τον δικό μας, τερματίζοντας κάθε ίχνος ζωής. Λίγο καιρό νωρίτερα κι ενώ το ανθρώπινο γένος προσπαθεί να συμβιβαστεί με τον αναπόφευκτο αφανισμό του, δύο αδερφές, η Justine (Kirsten Dunst) και η Claire (Charlotte Gainsbourg), βιώνουν με ολότελα διαφορετικό τρόπο τις τελευταίες τους ώρες.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: akitashoblogspot

「鬱」そのものを話の軸にしている映画は多くない。
しかし、ダークなストーリーや人間のどん底な部分を重く描くことで知られるデンマーク出身のラース・フォン・トリアー監督の
作品の多くはその要素を持っている (『ダンサー イン ザ ダーク』『アンタイ クリスト』)。
その監督が常にテーマの一部であったであろう「鬱」を正面から描くことに挑んだ新作『Melancholia』が
明るいホリデイ映画がきらめくなかで異様な空気を放っている。

うつ病を患う主役ジャスティーンはキルスティン ダンストによって力強く演じられる。
映画は冒頭の数分で大まかな話の終始を見せる。そこに描かれるのは苦しくて重いジャスティーンが観る世界。
そしてこの地球の終わり。
メランコリー、と日本語でいうとかわいい夕暮れ時なイメージだけど、西洋でメランコリーと言えば
憂鬱を意味する。そしてこの映画ではメランコリアという巨大惑星が地球に迫り続ける。

ジャスティーンと彼女の姉(シャルロット・ゲンズブール)の曇りが晴れない日々にくる地球の終わりは
ハッピーエンドとして僕の目には映った。
テーマがテーマだけに観客の好き嫌いははっきりすだろう。でもジャスティーンの家族を演じる俳優たち(シャルロット・ゲンズブール、
シャーロット・ランプリング、キーファー・サザーランド 、アレクサンダー・スカルスガルド )の演技と
このユニークなキャスティングはかなりエンターテイニング。

しばらく出演作品があまり話題になっていなかったキルスティン ダンストはこの作品のプロモーションを機会に
様々なメディアに露出し、相変わらず屈託の無い笑顔を振りまいている。そして、「29歳にして彼女の第2のスタート」という文字もちらほら。

劇中、一人では食事もできずお風呂に入ることもできなくなってしまうジャスティーン。かなり説得力があるその演技をみせるダンストは
過去に鬱病であった監督からにじみ出る何かを見事に汲み取った違いない。