Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke

Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke The 3D Additivist Manifesto

source: artfcity

”The 3D Addivist Manifesto,” a collaborative video-text between artists Morehshin Allahyari and writer Daniel Rourke, explains the tenets of the digital manifesto over a sleek background of a black-and-white printed planet. The voice of the narrator has a slow, creaky voice, a blend of human and machine:

Additivism can emancipate us.
Additivism will eradicate us.

We call for: Designs, blueprints and instructions for 3D printing:

Tools of industrial espionage
Tools for self-defense against armed assault
Tools to disguise
Tools to aid/disrupt surveillance
Tools to raze/rebuild
Objects beneficial in the promotion of protest, and unrest
Objects for sealing and detaining
Torture devices
Instruments of chastity, and psychological derangement
Sex machines
We want to encourage, interfere, and reverse-engineer the possibilities encoded into the censored, the invisible, and the radical notion of the 3D printer itself. To endow the printer with the faculties of plastic: condensing imagination within material reality.

We call not for passive, dead technologies but rather for a gradual awakening of matter, the emergence, ultimately, of a new form of life.

It’s about time, 2015. With every new machine-age, come manifestos to help us figure out how to relate to each other, as well as our machines. From the violent beauty of the Futurists to the menacing biotech in the “Cyborg Manifesto,” we’ve clamored for a way forward that isn’t tied town to the past. Savage poetry—rather than clarity—tends to be a manifesto’s strong suit.
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source: additivismorg

Derived from petrochemicals boiled into being from the black oil of a trillion ancient bacterioles, the plastic used in 3D Additive manufacturing is a metaphor before it has even been layered into shape. Its potential belies the complications of its history: that matter is the sum and prolongation of our ancestry; that creativity is brutal, sensual, rude, coarse, and cruel. 1 We declare that the world’s splendour has been enriched by a new beauty: the beauty of crap, kipple 2 and detritus. A planet crystallised with great plastic tendrils like serpents with pixellated breath 3 …for a revolution that runs on disposable armaments is more desirable than the contents of Edward Snowden’s briefcase; more breathtaking than The United Nations Legislative Series.
There is nothing which our infatuated race would desire to see more than the fertile union between a man and an Analytical Engine. Yet humankind are the antediluvian prototypes of a far vaster Creation. 4 The whole of humankind can be understood as a biological medium, of which synthetic technology is but one modality. Thought and Life both have been thoroughly dispersed on the winds of information. 5 Our power and intelligence do not belong specifically to us, but to all matter. 6 Our technologies are the sex organs of material speculation. Any attempt to understand these occurrences is blocked by our own anthropomorphism. 7 In order to proceed, therefore, one has to birth posthuman machines, a fantasmagoric and unrepresentable repertoire of actual re-embodiments of the most hybrid kinds.
We want to encourage, interfere, and reverse-engineer the possibilities encoded into the censored, the invisible, and the radical notion of the 3D printer itself. To endow the printer with the faculties of plastic: condensing imagination within material reality. 10 The 3D print then becomes a symptom of a systemic malady. An aesthetics of exaptation, 11 with the peculiar beauty to be found in reiteration; in making a mesh. 12 This is where cruelty and creativity are reconciled: in the appropriation of all planetary matter to innovate on biological prototypes. 13 From the purest thermoplastic, from the cleanest photopolymer, and shiniest sintered metals we propose to forge anarchy, revolt and distemper. Let us birth disarray from its digital chamber.
To mobilise this entanglement we propose a collective: one figured not only on the resolution of particular objects, but on the change those objects enable as instruments of revolution and systemic disintegration. Just as the printing press, radio, photocopier and modem were saturated with unintended affects, so we seek to express the potential encoded into every one of the 3D printer’s gears. Just as a glitch can un-resolve an image, so it can resolve something more posthuman: manifold systems – biological, political, computational, material. We call for planetary pixelisation, using Additivist technologies to corrupt the material unconscious; a call that goes on forever in virtue of this initial movement. 14 We call not for passive, dead technologies but rather for a gradual awakening of matter, the emergence, ultimately, of a new form of life. 15
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source: machinemachinenet

The 3D Additivist Manifesto + Cookbook blur the boundaries between art, engineering, science fiction, and digital aesthetics. We call for you – artists, activists, designers, and critical engineers – to accelerate the 3D printer and other Additivist technologies to their absolute limits and beyond into the realm of the speculative, the provocative and the weird.
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source: additivismorg

Current debate rages around the naming of The Anthropocene, the evolution of intelligent machines, and the contradictions inherent in material critiques of our technocapitalist civilisation.
The 3D Printer is a metaphor for these weirdest of times: a technology with the capacity to channel creative endeavour through digital processes into the reformation of raw matter.
We propose #Additivism as a new movement in technological and artistic activism that contends with these concerns.
The 3D Additivist Manifesto + Cookbook is a project that blurs the boundaries between art, engineering, science fiction, and digital aesthetics. The Manifesto is produced by Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke in the form of a text and a video with sound design by Andrea Young. It calls for you – artists, activists, designers, scientists, and critical engineers – to accelerate the 3D printer and other Additivist technologies to their absolute limits and beyond into the realm of the speculative, the provocative and the weird.
We ask for you to submit to The 3D Additivist Cookbook, to be released to the world in Autumn 2015.