NANCY HOLT

Sun Tunnel

NANCY HOLT

source: manidistregait

Una delle opere più affascinanti è quella dei Sun Tunnels (istallati tra il 1973 e il 1976) da Nancy Holt, nata anche lei nel 1938 come Smithson e scomparsa nel 2014. Questa è senza dubbio la sua opera più famosa, tra le innumerevoli collocate in spazi pubblici sparsi in quasi tutto il mondo. L’interesse creativo dell’artista si rivolge all’interazione tra luce, prospettiva, tempo e spazio, con l’impiego di mezzi come fotografia, film, scultura, istallazioni e interventi di land art.

L’opera Sun Tunnels è un’istallazione di grandi dimensioni localizzata nella parte nord occidentale dello Utah, negli Stati Uniti. Il lavoro è composta da quattro cilindri di calcestruzzo lunghi circa cinque metri e mezzo (18 piedi), dal diametro di circa due metri e sessanta (9 piedi), disposti a croce per un ingombro di circa 26 metri (86 piedi) di raggio. I tunnelsonoposizionati sul terreno desertico a formare una croce che allinea i propri assi con il sorgere del sole e il suo tramonto nei solstizi estivo e invernale.

Nelle due date l’allineamento col sole è perfetto, ma c’è di più. Ogni cilindro è forato in modo da riprodurre le stelle di quarto costellazioni: Drago, Perseo, Colomba e Capricorno. Il progetto della Holt permette un gioco cangiante di luci ed ombre che accarezzano la rigida superficie del calcestruzzo, il più artificiale/naturale dei materiali possibili, e lo rendono paesaggisticamente cogente. I tunnel perdono la natura di manufatto di materiale industrialmente brutale, per diventare un segna-tempo, un compasso, un “mirino” che centra sole e paesaggio, un cannocchiale che permette la visione della terra, e della natura vasta, secondo lo stato della luce naturale. Lo spazio vastissimo del deserto si riduce alla scala dell’anima dell’osservatore, illuminandosi d’immenso. Minimalismo e concettualismo sono alla base del progetto che però dà risultati giganteschi in termini di percezione artistica della natura e dell’universo.

I Sun Tunnels si trovano nei pressi di Lucin, a solo circa tre ore di auto da Salt Lake City, capitale dello Utah negli Stati Uniti d’America.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: umfautahedu

Nancy Holt is most widely known for her large-scale artwork Sun Tunnels (located in Lucin, UT); however, she has created works in public places all over the world. The artist’s interest in light, perspective, time, and space certainly influenced her photographs, films, sculpture, and installation art, but perhaps it is most magnificently illustrated in her Land art. Land art emerged in the 1960s, coinciding with a growing ecology movement in the United States, which asked people to become more aware of the impact they can have on the natural environment. Land art changed the way people thought of art; not only did it take art out of the gallery and museum, but it also took art out of the market. Many Land art sites are located in remote, uninhabited regions. We are lucky that such an influential work of art is within a day’s drive from the UMFA.

Sun Tunnels consists of four massive concrete tunnels, each eighteen feet long and nine feet in diameter, laid out in the desert in an open X configuration. On the solstices, the tunnels frame the sun as it passes the horizon at sunrise and sunset. In the top of each tunnel, Holt drilled small holes to form the constellations of Draco, Perseus, Columba, and Capricorn. These holes, and the tunnels themselves, act as frames or lenses through which the visitor can view the surrounding sky and landscape of the Great Basin Desert.

To create her 1978 film Sun Tunnels, Holt camped for days on end in the barren desert. In Holt’s cinematic and photographic documents currently on view at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, we can observe myriad nuances of light and shadow inhabiting the installation over time. But to fully experience this important work of Land art, climb into the tunnels, view the surrounding landscape through the cylindrical frames, and feel the desert air in Utah’s Great Basin.

Walk around Sun Tunnels. As you walk, spend some time surveying the tunnels from up close and from a distance. Look through them. Experience the interior of the tunnels and the perforations in them. Listen. Notice the way the change in the time of day, weather, or angle of the sun affect your perception.

Look at the view of the surrounding landscape beyond the tunnels. Then look at the same area of landscape through a tunnel. How does the cylindrical frame change your personal experience of the landscape? Do you notice new things about the landscape when looking at a defined viewpoint?

Sun Tunnels responds to the orientation of the earth and celestial bodies. How does the changing angle of the sun affect your perception? As you explore the tunnels, do you feel a different relationship to the earth and sky?

Sun Tunnels is a site specific work of Land art. The site itself was a very important consideration for the artist. Reflect on your journey to this site. How did traversing a distance of remote, untamed land make you feel? How does this impact the meaning of the work?
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: artforum

SUN TUNNELS, 1973–76, is built on forty acres, which I bought in 1974 specifically as a site for the work. The land is in the Great Basin Desert in northwestern Utah, about four miles southeast of Lucan (pop. ten) and nine miles east of the Nevada border.

Sun Tunnels marks the yearly extreme positions of the sun on the horizon—the tunnels being aligned with the angles of the rising and setting of the sun on the days of the solstices, around June 21st and December 21st. On those days the sun is centered through the tunnels, and is nearly center for about ten days before and after the solstices.

The four concrete tunnels are laid out on the desert in an open X configuration eighty-six feet long on the diagonal. Each tunnel is eighteen feet long, and has an outside diameter of nine feet and two-and-a-half inches and an inside diameter of eight feet with a wall of thickness of seven-and-a-quarter inches. A rectangle drawn around the outside of the tunnels would measure sixty-eight-and-a-half feet by fifty-three feet.

Cut through the wall in the upper half of each tunnel are holes of four different sizes—seven, eight, nine, and ten inches in diameter. Each tunnel has a different configuration of holes corresponding to stars in four different constellations—Draco, Perseus, Columba, and Capricorn. The sizes of the holes vary relative to the magnitude of the stars to which they correspond. During the day, the sun shines through the holes, casting a changing pattern of pointed ellipses and circles of light on the bottom half of each tunnel. On nights when the moon is more than a quarter full, moonlight shines through the holes casting its own paler pattern. The shapes and positions of the cast light differ from hour to hour, day to day, and season to season, relative to the positions of the sun and moon in the sky.

Each tunnel weighs twenty-two tons and rests on a buried concrete foundation. Due to the density, shape, and thickness of the concrete, the temperature is fifteen to twenty degrees cooler inside the tunnels in the heat of day. There is also a considerable echo inside the tunnels.

Nancy Holt

In 1974 I looked for the right site for Sun Tunnels in New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah. What I needed was flat desert ringed by low mountains. It was hard finding land which was both for sale and easy to get to by car. The state and federal governments own about two-thirds of the land, the rest is owned mainly by railroads and large ranches, and is usually sold in one-square-mile sections. Fortunately, the part of the valley I finally chose for Sun Tunnels had been divided up into smaller sections, and several of these were for sale. I bought forty acres, a quarter of a mile square.

My land is in a large, flat valley with very little vegetation—it’s land worn down by Lake Bonneville, an ancient lake that gradually receded over thousands of years. The Great Salt Lake is what remains of the original lake now, but it’s just a puddle by comparison. From my site you can see mountains with lines on them where the old lake bit into the rock as it was going down. The mirages are extraordinary: You can see whole mountains hovering over the earth, reflected upside down in the heat. The feeling of timelessness is overwhelming.

An interminable string of warped, arid mountains with broad valleys swung between them, a few waterholes, a few springs, a few oasis towns and a few dry towns dependent for water on barrels and horsepower, a few little valleys where irrigation is possible…a desert more vegetationless, more indubitably hot and dry, and more terrible than any desert in North America except possibly Death Valley…Even the Mormons could do little with it. They settled its few watered valleys and let the rest of it alone.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: badischer-kunstvereinde

Nancy Holt, 1938 in Worcester, Massachusetts, geboren, lebt heute in Galisteo, New Mexico. Nach ihrem Studium an der Tufts University zog Holt nach New York, wo sie – ebenso wie ihre Kollegen und Mitstreiter Michael Heizer, Carl Andre, Eva Hesse, Richard Serra und Robert Smithson – mit den Medien Film, Video, Installation und Sound Art zu arbeiten begann. Nancy Holts Arbeiten wurden national und international ausgestellt, u.a. im Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, im Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C., im Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris und in der Tate Modern in London.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: tudosobreearthartblogspot

Nancy Holt nasceu em Worchester, Massachusetts. Ela passou uma grande parte de sua infância em Nova Jersey. Ela foi educado na Universidade de Tufts, em Medford, Massachusetts . Três anos depois de se formar, ela se casou com o artista ambiental Robert Smithson , em 1963. Holt começou sua carreira artística como fotógrafa e como uma artista de vídeo. Este envolvimento com fotografia e câmera óptica são pensados ​​para ter influenciado suas posteriores obras de terraplanagem, que estão “literalmente vendo dispositivos, pontos fixos para monitoramento das posições do sol, a terra e as estrelas”. Hoje Holt é mais amplamente conhecida por seu grande trabalhos ambientais escala, dom Túneis e Dark Star Parque . No entanto, ela criou ao local e ao tempo obras ambientais em locais públicos em todo o mundo. Holt contribuiu para diversas publicações, que têm caracterizado os seus artigos e fotografias escritas. Ela também é autor de vários livros. Holt recebeu cinco National Endowment for the Arts Bolsas, Nova Iorque criativas Artista Bolsas e um Guggenheim Fellowship. Holt junto com Beverly Pimenta é um destinatário da International Sculpture centro 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award em Contemporary Sculpture. Ela atualmente trabalha e reside em Galisteo, no Novo México.

Um trabalho monumental da artista Nancy Holt, os Túneis de Sol são feitos de quatro manilhas de concreto com diâmetro aproximado de 3 metros cada, com 6 metros de comprimento. Este pôr do Sol em um dia frio e nublado ocorreu em data próxima ao solstício de inverno de 2010. Durante as horas entre o pôr e o nascer do Sol, buracos nas laterais das manilhas projetam a luz do Sol em suas paredes interiores, formando um mapa das principais estrelas das constelações de Draco, Perseu, Columba, e Capricórnio.
Os túneis estão dispostos em formato de um grande X para um alinhamento correto em relação ao pôr do Sol e ao nascer do Sol de solstício. Nesta foto impressionante através de um Túnel de Sol, o Sol está bem no horizonte. E quem estiver no Deserto da Grande Bacia (Great Basin Desert) nas cercanias de Lucin, no estado americano de Utah, em datas próximas ao solstício poderá ver o Sol nascer e se pôr através de Túneis de Sol.
Na astronomia,solstício (do latim sol + sistere, que não se mexe) é o momento em que o Sol, durante seu movimento aparente na esfera celeste, atinge a maior declinação em latitude, medida a partir da linha do equador. Os solstícios ocorrem duas vezes por ano: em dezembro e em junho. O dia e hora exatos variam de um ano para outro. Quando ocorre no verão significa que a duração do dia é a mais longa do ano.
Analogamente, quando ocorre no inverno, significa que a duração da noite é a mais longa do ano. Os Túneis do Sol estão localizados a aproximadamente 150 milhas de carro de outra obra interessante, do artista Robert Smithson, conhecida como Spiral Jetty.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: pijamasurf

Nancy Holt, una de las artistas más identificadas con el land-art en Estados Unidos, falleció el pasado 8 de febrero después de luchar contra la leucemia. Holt trabajó lejos de las galerías haciendo instalaciones específicas para sitios en diferentes lugares del mundo; la más reconocida es Sun Tunnels en el desierto de Utah. Sus esculturas cifran la profunda relación entre la tierra y el cosmos, un poco como el trabajo de James Turrell y Charles Ross, y como antes las grandes construcciones de arqueoastronomía.

“Quiero llevar la vastedad del espacio del desierto de regreso a la escala humana”, escribió Holt sobre Sun Tunnels, su obra maestra. Para construirla se mudó temporalmente a un pedazo de tierra en Utah que compró en 1974. Desde un principio documentó el proceso, para el que se requirieron: “2 ingenieros, 1 astrofísico, 1 astrónomo, 1 investigador, 1 asistente, 1 agrimensor, 3 operadores de maquinaria pesada, 1 caprintero, 3 excavadores, 10 trabajadores de la compañía de pipas, 2 perforadores, 4 conductores de camiones, 1 operador de grúa, 2 hombres de cámara, 2 hombres de sonido, 1 piloto de helicóptero y 4 trabajadores de un laboratorio de fotografía”.

La obra consta de 4 grandes contenedores cilíndricos de concreto que forman una X, como las secciones de una pipa. El 21 de diciembre, al amanecer y al atardecer la luz del sol se alínea perfectamente y atraviesa estos “túneles” creando una visión luminosa que los mismo evoca culturas paganas que culturas industriales, en una interesante fusión de mundos. Los usuarios pueden recorrer el túnel y observar parcelas de cielo o practicar el “sungazing” en los cilindros llameantes.

Sun Tunnels debe citarse junto con Star Axis de Charles Ross y Roden Crater de James Turrell (ambas en construcción) como las grandes obras del land-art estadounidense, construcciones épicas que son instrumentos de percepción y de reconexión con, parafraseando al poeta Ginsberg, la antigua maquinaria celeste. En realidad estos túneles solares, como puede apreciarse en el video, son tecnología poética de psiconáutica silvestre. Resulta muy apropiado que Holt iniciará su carrera artística escribiendo poesía concreta: Sun Tunnels es la concreción estelar de este afán. Es el marco, la métrica, lo que convoca a lo poético, que se desdobla en psicoducto, ojo de fuego/túnel radiante.