PIERRE HUYGHE

皮埃爾·於熱
ピエール·ユイグ

source: moussemagazineit

If you walk to the Centre Pompidou in Paris from the direction of the Seine, you will most likely end up in a little public square that stretches between the Beaubourg and the church of Saint-Merri: Place Igor Stravinsky. Here, in a shallow basin measuring 580 square meters, sixteen sculptures made in 1983 by Jean Tinguely and Niki de Saint Phalle entertain onlookers with their entirely whimsical demeanor, surfing along and spraying water at each other. The bright colors of the kinetic statues, the joy and lightheartedness of their movements, make the whole composition look like a sculptural spin-off of Disney’s Fantasia. But it wouldn’t have seemed so remarkably flawless had the administrators followed the original instructions left by Tinguely, who never wanted the water in the basin to be treated, as he preferred that moss eventually be allowed to grow (this did not happen, and the sculptures today looks almost identical to when they were unveiled exactly 30 years ago). This little anecdote may bear some connection with the concerns and interests of another artist – Pierre Huyghe – who as we write, is installing his first major retrospective just a few meters away from that fountain, in the South Gallery of the Pompidou.

The exhibition, which is to run in Paris until January 2014 and will later travel to the Ludwig Museum in Cologne and LACMA in Los Angeles, features about 50 of his projects, spanning some two decades of his career, and eloquently demonstrates the artist’s recent obsession with “live situations.” Huyghe would probably have loved to see the moss grow on those sculptures, to witness the impermanent epiphany of a living environment slowly invading the “space of representation,” in a similar fashion to what the French artist did with “A Forest of Lines” in 2008 (when he overrun the Sydney Opera House with hundreds of trees, transforming the concert hall floor into a forest for 24 hours). Somewhat akin to what happened in Sydney, Huyghe has transformed the Pompidou in a world unto itself, not orchestrated, but living at its own rhythms. The Paris show, curated by Emma Lavigne with the assistance of Florencia Chernajovsky, is a jungle of objects, spaces, and narratives that change, evolve or even decompose according to the pace of organic life, emphasizing once more the “living dimension” of the artist’s most recent ventures. Take, for example, his project for dOCUMENTA (13) last year, and the controlled wilderness he recreated behind the bushes at the end of the Karlsaue Park.

Speaking about that work, the artist said: “There is repetition, chemical reaction, reproduction, formation, and vitality; but the existence of a system is uncertain.” In other words, most of the action takes place with limited, if any, control by the artist. Growing moss is welcomed here, even encouraged. And as a matter of fact, the Paris show is itself basically “growing” on another representation – the rails and remains of the Mike Kelley exhibition that was in the gallery immediately before Huyghe’s retrospective. This self-generating world is conceived to vary in time and space, almost indifferent to human presence, past and present; and the unregulated nature of such an experiment is meant to generate unfixed narratives and “breathing” monuments (actually, it all operates as the opposite of a monument, since the works, rather than representing a firm statement, are subject to continuous shifts between different resolutions, releasing and receiving in a state of permanent osmosis). Huyghe is more interested in transitions than conclusions; he ’s looking at the stops along the railroad rather than the final destination, inquiring into the dynamic chain of events rather then the epilogue. And some of these events are so temporal that they literally fade or melt away over time, like the ship made out of ice that the artist placed in the Kunsthaus Bregenz as part of his “L’Expedition Scintillante: A Musical,” in 2002. The viewer can predict the eventual doom of what he’s looking at, but this fate is not centered on the human element in the room (“Planet Earth is blue, and there’s nothing I can do,” as Bowie would have said). The slow erosion of the image plane is somewhat inevitable; the flaws of biological reality are disclosed, and Huyghe’s finger is pointing right at the minuscule imperfections of these “live situations,” at the moss that tries but fails to grow on Tinguely’s sculptures. The treated water of the fountain in Place Stravinsky marks the exact border between the vital aspect of things and the orchestrated, even spurious narratives of Disney fairytales. And it is no coincidence that one of the most iconic works on show at the Pompidou is the 1997 video Blanche Neige Lucie, where the artist filmed the woman who was the voice of Snow White in the original French version of the Disney movie. Alleging that her voice was “stolen”, the woman in the video claims to have sued the studio over the rights to her interpretation of the part. As the interview goes on, the aura of candor and purity of the cartoon slowly evaporates and the “living dimension” surfaces. And somehow you’re stuck with a voice in your head that seems to whisper, “let the moss grow.”

Nicola Ricciardi
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source: rtve
Pierre Huyghe es un artista multidisciplinar que juega con nuestra percepción del tiempo y de la realidad, a la vez que inventa nuevos modos y formatos de producción y exhibición de arte contemporáneo. En sus espectáculos en directo difumina la línea divisoria entre artes plásticas y artes escénicas y rompe las convenciones sobre la forma de su presentación. Temas recurrentes en estas obras son la construcción y mediatización de la realidad. Juega con realidades basadas en narrativas inventadas o contrasta narrativas paralelas dadas para señalar la existencia de realidades múltiples producidas por la percepción e interpretación subjetivas de distintos narradores y receptores.
En años recientes los aspectos escénicos y los eventos en vivo han ido cobrando importancia en las piezas de Huyghe. “La expedición centelleante” (2002) es una exposición compuesta de varias partes que se presentan en cada piso del museo como si de los diferentes actos de una ópera se tratara.
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ource: art-magazin
Der 1962 in Paris geborene Huyghe ist ein Künstler des Realismus im wortwörtlichen Sinne, ein Provokateur unvorhersehbarer Ereignisse und Entwicklungen. Leitmotiv ist die Suche nach dem Moment, in dem Wirklichkeit zur Fiktion wird und umgekehrt. In “L’Ellipse” ließ er 1998 Schauspieler Bruno Ganz 20 Jahre später eine Szene aus Wim Wenders Film “Der amerikanische Freund” nachspielen, die im Original fehlte. In der Videoinstallation “The Third Memory” stellte 1999 ein verurteilter Bankräuber, in Sidney Lumet’s Film “Dog Day Afternoon” von 1975 gespielt von Al Pacino, seinen Überfall mit Komparsen nach. Die Rekonstruktion wurde auf einer zweiten Leinwand den entsprechenden Szenen aus dem Kinofilm und historischen Direktaufnahmen vom Überfall aus dem amerikanischen Fensehen gegenübergestellt.
Huyghe, der in New York und Paris lebt und als einer der einflussreichsten Künstler seiner Generation gilt, geht es um Prozesse, um zeitliche Abläufe. Dafür kombiniert er Live-Performances, Film und Multimedia-Installation. 2005 kombinierte er im Film “The Journey that wasn’t” Aufnahmen einer tatsächlich unternommenen Antarktis-Expedition mit dem Konzert eines Sinfonieorchesters, das klanglich die Topografie einer von Huyghe entdeckten Insel umzusetzen versuchte, gefilmt auf der Eislaufbahn des New Yorker Central Park. Der direkte Weg zum Ziel hat Huyghe dabei noch nie interessiert. Stattdessen demonstriert er dem ins Spektakel einbezogenen Betrachter, wie der Alltag zu Kunst wird. Im Film “The Host and the Cloud” spielen 2009/10 junge Leute im geschlossenen Raum eines Pariser Museums historische Szenen wie die Krönung des selbsternannten afrikanischen Kaisers Bokassa nach, ehe es unter Einfluss von Drogen zu improvisierten Orgien kommt.
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source: treccaniit – Giovanna Mencarelli
Artista francese, nato a Parigi l’11 settembre 1962. Ancora ragazzo, prima di avvicinarsi all’arte, H. ha frequentato ambienti culturali alternativi, vicini ai movimenti anarchici e punk. Dopo aver seguito i corsi dell’École supérieure des arts graphiques (1981-82), nel 1984 si è diplomato presso l’École supérieure des arts décoratifs di Parigi, dove ha poi svolto la sua attività artistica. Ha iniziato la sua ricerca interessandosi al Situazionismo e all’arte di intervento urbano, sperimentando tecniche diverse come la fotografia e i video, e realizzando anche film, installazioni e lavori su carta e in legno. Le sue opere sono state presentate in spazi espositivi non tradizionali ma anche in sedi prestigiose (S. R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2003; Dia Center for Arts, New York 2003-04; Castello di Rivoli, Torino, 2004; Moderna Museet, Stoccolma, 2005; ARC, Musée d’art moderne de la Ville, Parigi, 2006; Tate modern gallery, Londra, 2006 ecc.), rivelando sempre grande interesse per lo spazio di per sé espressivo, e per il momento espositivo come percorso in cui far emergere nuove realtà e nuove esperienze. Già a partire dagli anni Ottanta ha realizzato le sue performances in collaborazione con altri artisti quali C. Closky, X. Veilhan, P. Joseph, D. Gonzales-Foerster, Ph. Parreno. Con quest’ultimo, dopo aver acquisito nel 1999 i diritti di riproduzione di un personaggio femminile disegnato per il mercato giapponese dell’animazione, ha realizzato il progetto No ghost just a shell (1999-2003), con lo scopo di fornire un’identità, un nome (Annlee) e una vita propria a tale personaggio, attraverso alcuni video in 3D. Il provocatorio passaggio legale della proprietà del copyright ad Annlee si rivela momento culminante della riflessione dell’artista sull’identità individuale e sul suo annullamento provocato dall’industria dello spettacolo, affrontata anche nel film Blanche Neige Lucie (1997), la cui protagonista è però un personaggio reale, la cantante francese L. Dolène, doppiatrice del personaggio animato di Biancaneve e vincitrice nel 1996 di una causa contro la Disney voice characters per i diritti d’uso della propria voce.
L’analisi del linguaggio cinematografico nelle sue valenze tecniche e simboliche costituisce un altro filo conduttore della ricerca di H., che ha realizzato opere ispirate a film famosi, quasi sempre interpretate da attori dilettanti. In particolare si ricordano il film Les incivils (1995), girato negli stessi luoghi di Uccellacci e uccellini (1966) di P.P. Pasolini, di cui l’artista utilizza la sceneggiatura, il montaggio e le inquadrature per proporne una nuova lettura. L’ellipse, del 1998, si presenta come una proiezione simultanea di tre scene filmate: le due laterali, che si susseguono, sono tratte da Der amerikanische Freund (1977; L’amico americano) di W. Wenders, mentre quella centrale è girata da H. con lo stesso protagonista del film, B. Ganz, filmato in tempo reale mentre attraversa un ponte, come se andasse da un luogo all’altro della finzione in modo da colmare l’ellissi, ossia il salto spazio-temporale creato dal montaggio. Sleeptalking (1998) è stato invece presentato in due versioni. La prima mette a confronto in due sale adiacenti il film di A. Warhol Sleep (1963), che mostra il volto del poeta J. Giorno mentre dorme, e la voce del poeta che rievoca l’esperienza del film. La seconda, sempre accompagnata dal monologo di Giorno, fa vedere il volto attuale del poeta che, in dissolvenza, si trasforma in quello ripreso da Warhol. Per Mobil TV (1995) H. ha invece utilizzato uno spazio museale come studio televisivo e stazione trasmittente (evento da lui riproposto nel 1998 con l’artista M. Ohanian). Da ricordare inoltre Streamside day follies (Dia Center for the Arts, New York, 2003-04) un evento che fa parte di un progetto più complesso in via di sviluppo (Streamside day), basato sull’interesse di H. per il folklore e le tradizioni nella società contemporanea.
H. ha partecipato alle maggiori rassegne internazionali di arte contemporanea. Nel 2001 ha vinto il Premio speciale ‘La Biennale di Venezia’ per l’opera Le château de Turing e nel 2002 il premio Hugo Boss per l’opera Les grandes ensenbles.