SHINJI TURNER-YAMAMOTO

シンジターナー山本
Синдзи Тернер Ямамото

Global Tree Project: HANGING GARDEN

Shinji Turner-Yamamoto

source: highlike

About: My work is about the discovery of the essential in nature and time. I work with identifiable imagery to encourage humanity to encounter aspects of nature and the expanse of time in new and unexpected ways. I am committed to using historic and natural elements in my work as meditations on the environment. In 2010, I created a large scale tree installation, HANGING GARDEN, at the abandoned 19th century Holy Cross Church in Cincinnati. The interior was so unexpected after seeing the well-maintained façade. I walked into a ruin. The ceiling is stripped to the rafters; there is missing plaster, the wall is bare down to the wood lathe in places. What paint left is scaling. I felt the building was dying, not only physically, but spiritually. I needed to see new life in this decaying church. I envisioned a live tree supported by a large inverted dead tree at the heart of the church. The root system of the uprooted tree held the soil necessary to support the live tree, creating a suspended garden oriented as a sort of tower or cross at the church’s center. The journey that began with looking for a dead tree for the installation culminated two years later, when a live white birch tree was installed on top of an inverted dead white birch. Suspended, it looked so effortless. Treated with an organic compound that induced a state of dormancy, the tree was able to stay alive in this unusual situation. Surrounded at first by tall scaffolding and secured by several ropes held by my collaborators, the installation was in reality, a miracle and thing of wonder, supported by the enthusiasm and determination of project participants and the community. A monograph “Shinji Turner-Yamamoto: Global Tree Project,” documenting this project and ten others, was published in September 2012 by DAMIANI.
Photographer: Shinji Turner-Yamamoto
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source: globaltreeproject

Turner-Yamamoto studied at Kyoto City University of Arts and Accademia di Belle Arti di Bologna and has exhibited widely throughout Europe and Japan, and. His prizes include the UNESCO-ASCHBERG Bursaries for Artists, and Pépinières Européennes pour Jeunes Artistes, and 2000 first prize from the international Targetti Light Art Collection. Past exhibitions include Kyoto Art Walk (Kyoto, Japan – a 2005 international invitational he curated featuring eight installations in city landmarks by ten artists), Crawford Municipal Art Gallery (Cork, Ireland), Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Villa Croce (Genoa), MUAR (Moscow), Chelsea Art Museum (New York), and Ippaku-tei Teahouse, Embassy of Japan (Washington, DC). His most recent Global Tree Project, SLEEPING TREE, was realized in 2008 through the Greater Reston Arts Center. The catalog documenting this project was published in 2009, coinciding with the release of a documentary film on the project. Upcoming projects include participation in the 2010 Land Art Mongolia 360° Biennial. He is working with the US National Arboretum, Washington, DC, to create a series of works for the Bonsai and Penjing Museum.
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source: contemporaryartscenter

For this installation, Turner-Yamamoto uses elements such as plaster and paint chips to create sculptural works and a series of paintings which together are meant to comment on fragility and transience in the human world. The painting series, Pentimenti, utilizes a gilding technique inspired by medieval icons.

Disappearances is part of a larger regional project. Concurrent to this show, Turner-Yamamoto’s installation Hanging Garden will be on view at Holy Cross Church—the abandoned chapel located in the Monastery in Mount Adams. Hanging Garden is a sculpture consisting of two trees—a live tree perched atop a dead one—with roots intertwined. While surveying the grounds of the chapel, Turner-Yamamoto found the pieces of plaster and paint chips used in Disappearances.

Both Disappearances and Hanging Garden are a part of Turner-Yamamoto’s Global Tree Project, an international art initiative that seeks to open and affirm connections between audiences and the natural world.

Shinji Turner-Yamamoto was born in 1965 in Osaka, Japan and studied fresco painting in Kyoto. He has exhibited around the world, from India to Ireland, and is committed to using historic and natural elements in his work as meditations on the environment.
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source: yomga

Esta é a chamada Hanging Garden e foi feita com duas árvores (uma bétula morta e outra viva) dentro de uma igreja abandonada na cidade de Cincinnati, nos EUA. O trabalho do artista Shinji Turner-Yamamoto é parte de um grande projeto chamado Global Tree Project, que tem trabalhos espalhados no Japão, Índia, Irlanda, entre outros.

“Focado na natureza e no meio ambiente, eu crio instalações em locais específicos por todo o mundo, que exploram a interação entre a ausência e a presença e ilumino o espiritual na natureza”, explica o autor que ao conectar as duas árvores pelas raízes, uma morta e outra viva, quis evocar o ciclo da vida e aumentar as conexões das pessoas com o mundo natural.

Após o fim da impressionante instalação que durou 9 meses, a bétula viva foi replantada no jardim do monastério da Holy Cross Church e a outra teve seus galhos, raízes e troncos utilizados em projetos de arte de estudantes de escultura na Art Academy of Cincinnati, que trabalharam sob a supervisão de Yamamoto.
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source: webliojp

環境アート、環境芸術、エンバイロンメンタル・アート(Environmental art)とは、室内外を問わず、人間と観客を取り巻く環境そのものを作品と見立てる芸術の総称である。

John Fekner Toxic, Long Island Expressway, Queens, NY.
自然環境を制作素材とする作品はアースワークと呼ばれる。また、自然環境を生かした制作活動のみにとどまらず、様々な出来事の組み合わせ(ハプニング)や、そこから考えられる相互関係など、インスタレーション全般を環境アートとして考えることもできる。
また、エコロジーの機運が台頭してきた近年では、公園 広場、道路など、都市環境において、周辺環境との関係性を考慮して設計されるランドスケープ・デザインや、彫刻、モニュメント、噴水、遊具などのようなオブジェ自体を環境アートの作品と捉えることもある。
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source: prohandmade

Синдзи Тёрнер-Ямамото (Shinji Turner-Yamamoto) создал композицию в заброшенной церкви Святого Креста в Цинциннати. Органическая картина сделана из живого дерева, которое поддерживает перевёрнутое выкорчеванное мёртвое дерево. Всё это расположено под куполом церкви, в тишине.

Подвесной Сад – одна из частей большого проекта Тёрнер-Ямамото под названием “Глобальный проект деревьев”, который поощряет участие других в создании подобных работ. Местные волонтёры помогают художнику перевозить и устанавливать выбранное дерево в месте, где планируется разместить работу, а после окончания выставки – пересаживать обратно в землю. Живое дерево постоянно нуждается в поливе и подкормке. Процесс ухода позволяет местным участникам больше узнавать о земле и растениях. Другие композиции создавались в таких странах, как Индия, Ирландия, Финляндия, чтобы показать уникальное многообразие деревьев по всему миру.

Тёрнер-Ямамото выбрал заброшенную церковь в качестве места расположения, потому что ему нравятся следы времени и природы на строении. Вдохновлённый японской идеей “ваби-саби” (“красота в несовершенстве”), он почувствовал, что в том, как ломаются вещи, тоже есть своя красота. Внутреннее пространство церкви Святого Креста стало прекрасным вдохновляющим фактором для переосознания дерева, как скульптуры. “Забирая дерево из его естественного окружения, я приглашаю зрителей почувствовать природу в новом виде”.

Выставка поднебесного сада подошла к концу, но зрители уже с нетерпением ожидают новой работы в Проекте деревьев.