SUSANA SOARES

insects au gratin

source: susanasoares

‘Why not eat insects?’
This was the question asked by Vincent Holt in 1885, when he suggested in the St Paul Daily Globe that insects could act as a primary food source for humans. While the idea was rejected by the Victorians, insects have a long history as food in many places around the world.

As Holt pointed out, ‘insects are all vegetable feeders, clean, palatable, wholesome, and decidedly more particular in their feeding than ourselves’. They are also tremendously efficient at converting vegetation into edible protein. 100 kg of feed produces 40 kg of crickets, but only 10 kg of beef.

Insects Au Gratin looks for new ways of consuming insects and debates the nutritive and environmental aspects of insects as human food. One of the aspects that deters people from eating insects not only has to do with cultural background, but also with the aesthetics of the dishes themselves.

How it works

Edible insects are dried and grinded into powder. The insect flour is mixed with icing butter, cream cheese or water, gelling agent and flavouring to form the right consistency to go through the nozzle. The food aesthetics are designed previously, 3D printed and ready to eat or cooked.
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source: susanasoares

Born in Lisbon, Portugal, 1977

Soares work explores the implications for design of the current technological redesign of nature. Her projects involve developing collaborative frameworks between design and emerging scientific research. She employs design to explore future technological implications for public engagement and awareness.



She is currently based in London, UK and is a Senior Lecturer at London South Bank University. In addition she has held research fellow positions in » IMPACT! project, at Royal College of Art and » MATERIAL BELIEFS, at Goldsmiths University of London.

After completing a BA(Hons) in Product Design from ESAD, Portugal she graduated at MA Design Interaction in Royal College of Art, London. Susana has lectured internationally and has presented her work at Networkshop (Caltech University), Los Angeles, Creative Engagement/Medi(t)ation of Survival Symposium at MOMAK, Kyoto, and Headspace – scent as design conference, organised by Parsons, MoMA & Seed magazine, New York.

Her work has been published within design and scientific publications and exhibited at the MoMA, New York, MOMAK, Kyoto, Science Gallery, Dublin, Southbank Centre, London and The Royal Institution, London. Susana’s work is in the permanent collection of MoMA, New York.



Her current research focusses on how the understanding of technological redesigned living systems can generate new frameworks for design practice.