VALÉRIE LAMONTAGNE

peau d’ane

source: fashionbankru

Прошли те времена, когда платье было всего лишь платьем, но так как все мы стремительно движемся в будущее, каждый из нас, демонстрируя живой интерес к трансформации одежды, не хочет чтобы мода стояла на месте. Было так много примеров, когда наш излюбленный предмет одежды приобретал новую форму, а вместе с тем и новое звучание.

Дизайнер Валерии Лямонтань уловила заведомо успешное веяние нынешней моды. Художница из Канады создала серию интерактивных платьев, изменив привычную форму имитируя погодные значки. Свою коллекцию она назвала Peau d’Âne. Платья этой коллекции символизируют солнце, луну и небо.

Почему же платья названы Интерактивными Погодными?

Валери, разработала свои платья таким образом что они могут принимать как информацию температура, ультрафиолетовое излучение, солнечная радиация, скорость ветра, влажность воздуха и осадки по беспроводному каналу на вшитые в одежду микроконтроллеры, которые в свою очередь обмениваются информацией по внутренней схеме.

Каждое из платьев уникально; в Платье-Солнце встроено 128 светодиодов, на Платье-Луна нашит декор в виде 14 цвето-модулирующих цветов, каждый из которых фазу цикла луны, 14 вибрирующих воздушных кармана встроены в Платье-Небо.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: ecouterre

For Montreal-based designer Valerie Lamontagne, the spark of creativity can come from the most unlikely of sources. In the case of her climate-reactive dresses, Lamontagne found inspiration in “Peau d’Âne,” a French fairy tale that begins with a king’s vow to remarry only when he finds a woman who equals his late queen’s beauty and virtue. Pressed to find a new wife, he concludes that his daughter alone qualifies. (Quel scandale!) The princess delays the wedding by demanding impossible prenuptial gifts, including three dresses made from moonbeams, sunlight, and the sky. Lamontagne recreates these fantastic gowns but with a high-tech twist: Each dress reacts—in real time—to changing weather conditions.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: valerielamontagne

In the Charles Perrault fairy tale “Peau d’Âne” a young princess, whose kingdom’s riches are dependant on a gold excreting donkey, orders the impossible from her doting stepfather to thwart marrying him: three dresses made of immaterial materials. The first is to be made of the “sky” and should be as light and airy as the clouds. The second is to be made of “moonbeams” and should reflect the same lyrical intensity as the moon at night. The third, and last, is to be made of “sunlight” and should be as blinding and warm as the sun above

MAX/msp is used for compiling and keeping track of the data from the Weather Davis (temperature, UV, solar radiation, wind speed & velocity, humidity, rain fall). A set number of data parameters have been created for each of the dresses based on the weather readings particular to that dress. This data is sent out wirelessly via Xbee communication to embedded micro-controllers. Custom-built circuit boards receive data sent from MAX and relay these to the internal circuitry of the dress, effecting real-time changes which transform the dresses in unique ways. The Sun Dress has 128 individually addressable LEDs, while the Moon Dress has 14 colour-modulating flowers (standing in for the moon cycle) and the Sky Dress is imbued with 14 vibrating air pockets

Valérie Lamontagne is a PhD scholar researching “Performativity, Materiality and Laboratory Practices in Artistic Wearables” at Concordia University where she teaches in the Department of Design & Computation Arts. She has curated design and media arts exhibitions and events for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics; MuseumsQuartier, Vienna; V2_ Institute for the Unstable Media, Rotterdam; New Museum, New York; and the Musée National des Beaux Arts du Québec. Her fashion-tech and media designs have been featured internationally in festivals, galleries, museums and publications. She is the owner & designer at 3lectromode.com, a wearable electronics atelier dedicated to fashion-tech innovation.