YASUAKI ONISHI

reverse of volume

YASUAKI ONISHI REVERSE OF VOLUME

source: highlike
Statement: Onishi Yasuaki uses wire, glue line and crystallized urea for this installation. The wire makes organic parabola line from the ceiling. He dripping glue through it, and vertical thin glue line is connecting our ground. Crystallized urea appears on glue line and wire. Empty space are filing some phenomena which is gravity, time, action, heat, crystallization. We can discover new landscape in it.
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source: azurebumble

“I am interested in the visible and the invisible thing. Through my art work, I get information from the space and leave clues on the space. Form, color and movement is changed to the simple element, like points, lines and lights. It tells us the limited information. I would like to show the way of perception of this world through my work. Though each work doesn’t mean some specific matter or story, it will stimulate each imagination and thought. I think we can discover new value from the trivial matters.”
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source: procureddesign

Of the existing accounts of Yasuaki Onishi‘s portfolio, few have investigated his work beyond commending the artists’ ability to manipulate space. However, there is a strong link which runs throughout his entire body of work – namely the interaction between the ideas and implications surrounding kinetics.

Formally, Onishi’s work not only manipulates, but depends on movement in order to convey the meaning behind each piece. In the two-dimensional realm, his long-exposure photography in his Shaved & Rolled series softens otherwise violent and immediate jolts of fire. Similarly in his sculptural installations, Onishi’s works rise and fall – respiring as if to possess their own sentience.
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source: thesnapassembly
Japanese artist Yasuaki Onishi creates a fragile reality realised with a hot glue gun & crystals!
The immersive sculpture installation at an old Japanese sake winery presents delicate strands of a crystalline-like fibre climbing ladder-like to the concrete ceiling…. a vertical garden.
Reported by designboom :
” … the piece is created from long, dripping strands of liquid hot glue that are each covered in a crystalline material. by standing on a ladder, he carefully drizzles the fine threads into place, resulting in branch-like growths that hang from the ceiling in sweeping, undulating shapes…”
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source: thisiscolossal
Known for his ethereal and seemingly weightless installations of plastic membranes suspended in midair by black hot glue, Japanese artist Yasuaki Onishi embarked on a slightly different approach with his latest work, Vertical Emptiness. Currently on view at the Kyoto Art Center, the piece is made from upside down tree branches from which is draped a delicate framework of hot glue and crystallized urea compounds. The result is a sort of frozen snowfall that connects the gallery floor and ceiling. You can see the piece in much more detail in the video above by Kuroyanagi Takashi.
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source: wired
Each project starts the same way. Onishi enters a room and constructs a grid of wires that serve as a scaffold for his hot glue stalactites. Like a virtuoso cowboy, he stands atop a ladder with a glue gun in each hand and fires salvos of synthetic resin that give form to the empty space.
The process embraces randomness and Onishi admits that the idea for the unconventional method struck him in an equally unexpected way. “I worked in a huge studio with a sleeping space,” he says “One day I found a long string of glue between my working area and bed.”
Vertical Emptiness is the name of his latest series and the installations represents a subtle, but important shift in his work. “Every time I start a project the space inspires my work,” says Onishi. “I’ve made quite a lot of installations with black glue and hanging plastic sheets so I wanted to change how I went about filling the empty space and chose materials that I can’t control.”
A recent installation, constructed in a sake cellar, embodies this evolution. Onishi replaced his grid with thick organic stings of glue that droop between contact points in the ceiling.
While his previous projects seemed to float ephemerally, Vertical Emptiness is decidedly architectural, with columns and spans that could be seen as a Gaudí-esqe castle or spider-filled jungle.
Japanese artist Yasuaki Onishi creates stunning sculptures using humble hot glue guns.
Give most suburban crafters a glue gun and the best you can hope for is a tangle of pipe cleaners with googly eyes glued on. But in the hands of Japanese artist Yasuaki Onishi, the humble craft tool becomes a magic wand that can reveal hidden spaces.
Onishi’s projects all begin the same way. The artist enters a room and constructs a rigid grid of wires that serve as a scaffold for his hot glue stalactites. A plastic tarp is placed beneath the array, sometimes wrapped around a recognizable object like a Mercedes CLA, while other times it’s draped artfully in space. Like a virtuoso cowboy, he stands atop a ladder with a glue gun in each hand firing salvos of synthetic resin that slowly give form to the empty space between the wires and plastic. The process embraces randomness and Onishi admits that the idea for the unconventional method struck him in an equally unexpected way. “I worked in a huge studio with a sleeping space,” he says. “One day I found a long string of glue between my working area and bed.”