Alexandra Dementieva

Limited Spaces N2
On approaching the piece, the viewer must mount a bicycle and start pedaling at a suitable and steady speed — only then will the projection of a film onto the screen start. In order to watch the film to the end one has to continue cycling without stopping. This work is built around a performance, produced by two actors: a man riding a bicycle and a woman, who, concealed behind the screen, moves depending on the man’s velocity, unintentionally creating changing reliefs which resemble sculptures. The abusive nature of the relationship embodied in the performance clearly draws on the ancient Greek myth about sculptor Pygmalion and his “artwork” Galatea on the one hand, and on the other references more contemporary feminist discourse, something to which the artist is far from being indifferent. The faster the man pedals, the faster and more forcedly the woman moves. Few trained artists could withstand such a speed.

Daan Roosegaarde

Windvogel
WINDVOGEL are energy generating kites which create up to 100 kW and can supply about 200 households with green energy. Floating in the air, the smart kites move around and are connected with a cable to a ground station. This push and pull of the cable transforms into electricity, like the dynamo of a bicycle.

JEFFREY SHAW

The Legible City

In The Legible City the visitor is able to ride a stationary bicycle through a simulated representation of a city that is constituted by computer-generated three-dimensional letters that form words and sentences along the sides of the streets. Using the ground plans of actual cities – Manhattan, Amsterdam and Karlsruhe – the existing architecture of these cities is completely replaced by textual formations written and compiled by Dirk Groeneveld. Travelling through these cities of words is consequently a journey of reading; choosing the path one takes is a choice of texts as well as their spontaneous juxtapositions and conjunctions of meaning.

MATHIEU MERCIER

Lamps, furniture, bicycles, typography, museum plinths: Mathieu Mercier’s artistic creation moves masterfully between the categories of art and everyday culture, reflecting the concepts of twentieth-century Western culture, particularly those of the modern age, in the area of conflict between architecture, design and art.

William Kentridge

Sculpture bicycle wheel
Using film, drawing, sculpture, animation, and performance, he transmutes sobering political events into powerful poetic allegories. In a now-signature technique, Kentridge photographs his charcoal drawings and paper collages over time, recording scenes as they evolve. Working without a script or storyboard, he plots out each animated film, preserving every addition and erasure.

Roman Signer

РОМАНА ЗИГНЕРА
Fahrrad mit Farbe (Bicycle with Paint)
Né en 1938 en Suisse, Roman Signer est mondialement connu pour ses performances « explosives ». Depuis 1973, il conçoit une œuvre combinant sculpture, performance, photographie et documentation filmique. Fasciné par la puissance de la nature, il n’a de cesse de l’expérimenter à l’aide d’actions d’une grande force poétique, souvent à la limite du danger.

Marepe

Bicycle in the third conjugation

scott hessels

Sustainable Cinema No. 2: Lenticular Bicycle

Leah Harper

Bicycle

roman signer

РОМАНА ЗИГНЕРА
Bicycle with Paint
NÉ EN 1938 EN SUISSE, ROMAN SIGNER EST MONDIALEMENT CONNU POUR SES PERFORMANCES « EXPLOSIVES ». DEPUIS 1973, IL CONÇOIT UNE ŒUVRE COMBINANT SCULPTURE, PERFORMANCE, PHOTOGRAPHIE ET DOCUMENTATION FILMIQUE. FASCINÉ PAR LA PUISSANCE DE LA NATURE, IL N’A DE CESSE DE L’EXPÉRIMENTER À L’AIDE D’ACTIONS D’UNE GRANDE FORCE POÉTIQUE, SOUVENT À LA LIMITE DU DANGER.

JEAN TINGUELY

让汤格利
ז’אן טינגלי
ジャン·ティンゲリー
장 팅겔리
Жан Тингели
homage to new york
JEAN TINGUELY’S “Homage to New York” was billed as the ultimate homemade gadget — a towering contraption composed of found junk, dismembered bicycles, dismantled musical instruments, glass bottles, a meteorological balloon and electric motors in questionable condition. It was slated to come to life and spectacularly self-destruct in a one-night-only performance for some 250 patrons and reporters in the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden at the Museum of Modern Art on March 17, 1960. And self-destruct it did, but not quite according to plan.Mr. Tinguely’s self-destructive sculpture had failed — and thereby, in a sense, succeeded. Mr. Tinguely, a Swiss artist who died in 1991, was by 1960 well known for such Dada-inflected works; he posed with the wreckage after the performance and took a bow.