Lilla LoCurto & Bill Outcault

The willful marionette
the willful marionette (2014) was created by artists Lilla LoCurto and Bill Outcault during a residency with the University of North Carolina Charlotte, working with the College of Computing and Informatics as well as the College of Art and Architecture. The marionette is 3d printed from the scanned image of a human figure and responds engagingly in real time to spontaneous human gestures by reading a viewer’s movements and expressions. Its strings are manipulated by motors and software and there are two depth sensors that read and analyze the behaviors and gestures of participants. The puppet’s subsequent actions are designed to elicit further responses, creating an exchange focusing on the frailty and insecurities of the human participant and raising issues of contemporary relevance. The intention of the project was not to create so much a perfectly functioning robot but rather to imbue an obviously mechanically actuated marionette with the ability to solicit a physical and emotional dialog with a viewer.

MICHAEL SCHMIDT AND FRANCIS BITONTI

Articulated 3D-Printed Gown
Michael Schmidt and Francis Bitonti revealed their fully 3d printed gown modeled by Dita Von Teese.
The fully articulated gown based on the Fibonacci sequence was designed by Michael Schmidt and 3D modeled by architect Francis Bitonti to be 3D printed in Nylon by Shapeways. The gown was assembled from 17 pieces, dyed black, lacquered and adorned with over 13,000 Swarovski crystals to create a sensual flowing form.Thousands of unique components were 3D printed in a flowing mesh designed exactly to fit Ditta’s body. This represents the possibility to 3D print complex, customized fabric like garments designed exactly to meet a specific person or need.

AMY KARLE

regenerative reliquary
Leveraging the intelligence of human stem cells, she created “Regenerative Reliquary”, a bioprinted scaffold in the shape of a human hand design 3D printed in a biodegradable pegda hydrogel that disintegrates over time. The sculpture is installed in a bioreactor, with the intention that human Mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs from an adult donor) seeded onto that design will eventually grow into tissue and mineralize into bone along that scaffold.

Ai-Spacefactory

Marsha
Marsha is a AI SpaceFactory’s NASA-award-winning design and prototype for a 3D printed Mars habitat. The prototype was printed nearly autonomously in 2019 within a 30-hour construction window. “Our 3D print technology uses a recyclable biopolymer composite which outperformed concrete in NASA’s strength, durability, and crush testing. ASTM lab tested and certified to be two to three times stronger than concrete in compression, our space-grade material is also five times more durable than concrete in freeze-thaw conditions.” Ai-Spacefactory

threeASFOUR

MER KA BA
Bahai dress

New York-based trio Gabi Asfour, Angela Donhauser and Adi Gil form the fashion collective threeASFOUR, which creatively explores the intersection between fashion, sculpture and mysticism through their creations. The Bahai dress was 3D printed in collaboration with Bradley Rothenberg for the “MER KA BA” collection, which finds its inspiration in the sacred geometry and tile patterns found in religious buildings across the world.

ecoLogicStudio

H.O.R.T.U.S. XL Astaxanthin.g in-human garden
H.O.R.T.U.S. XL Astaxanthin.g is a large scale, high-resolution 3D printed bio-sculpture receptive to both human and non-human life. The project is conceived by Claudia Pasquero and Marco Poletto (ecoLogicStudio) and developed in collaboration with the Synthetic Landscape Lab at the University of Innsbruck.

adi meyer

borderline
Space Aware Wearable
Border Line is a 3D printed modular neck piece designed to alert the wearer of invisible urban boundaries through vibration and light stimuli. The data is fed by users and collected on a networked platform to redefine social boundaries throughout the city.

Morehshin Allahyari

Dark Matter
“Dark Matter” is a series of combined, sculptural objects modeled in Maya and 3D printed to form humorous juxtapositions.; The objects chosen for the first series are the objects/things that are forbidden or un-welcome in Iran by the government. The objects that in many other countries people use or own freely but under Iranian government laws (for several reasons) are forbidden or discouraged to use.

Rosalie Yu

Embrace in Progress
Embrace in Progress explores conflicted feelings of shared intimacy. It is inspired by personal and cultural experiences where human contact is not commonly practiced in social interaction. The daunting and unfamiliar proximity of being captured in someone’s arms distorts one’s sense of time. The project was inspired by slit-scan photography and uses depth sensors to capture a series of intimate embraces. These 3D printed pieces recreate the act of embracing and are represented in a static form by the flow of movement twisted because of time.

Anouk Wipprecht

Anouk Wipprecht and Polaire 3D printed electric chain

and Polaire
3D printed electric chain

Gilles AZZARO – Voice Sculptor

질 아자로
BARACK OBAMA: NEXT INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION
This monumental 3D Printed sculpture is the three-dimensional materialisation of President Obama’s voiceprint. The 3D voiceprint portrays an extract of President Obama’s February 2013 State of the Union Address. It represents the materialisation of the very thoughts and words of the President of the USA. The sculpture is interactive. A movement sensor activates the system and a laser beam scans the 3D recording to reveal the President’s words and message. The work was printed using a 3D desktop printer and the housing designed by Patrick SARRAN.

DIGITAL GROTESQUE

full scale 3D printed room realized

MELINDA LOOI

3D printed fashion show

IRIS VAN HERPEN

n9
3d printed fashion
Айрис Ван Эрпен
イリス ヴァン ヘルペン

Moritz Simon

Glitch Robot
The Installation consists of several robotic actors. When the actors make contact with their instruments, they produce a sonic impression of an omnipresent texture of modern life: electronic music. The music robots used in this performance consists of recycled and 3D-printed parts such as harddisks, relays, tongues, motors and solenoids. Glitch Robot connects mechanical, visible movements to audible sound by using small sound-producing robots. Thus, the installation highlights the origin of the sound in a way no conventional medium of electronic music production is able to. Typically, electronic music eliminates the haptic aspect of sound-generation, creating a void in understanding of how sound, and thus music, is mechanically created.

YOICHI YAMAMOTO

Japanese firm yoichi yamamoto architects has completed ‘2D/3D chairs’ for tokyo fashion labels issey miyake store. featuring a series of traditional dining chairs, the installation transforms from a two dimensional graphic into a tangible piece. The perspective is manipulated creating a unique appearance from different vantage points for onlookers. graphics of legs in varying perspectives are printed onto a horizontal plane while the chair backs rest upon the surface. The seat backs maintain a seamless transition from the graphics by utilizing assorted sizes, heights and placed at diverse angles.

Daniel Widrig

‘SnP’, 2018, recycled plastic, injection moulded

“Widrig’s art breaks down the boundaries between disciplines; borrowing tools traditionally associated with one industry and using them in other fields, in often unanticipated and exciting ways. Widrig uses computer simulation processes and advanced technologies adopted from the special effects business to create sculptural 3D-printed craftwork—digital designs materialize into intricate sculptures in glass or recycled plastic and furniture pieces with impeccable undulated thin surfaces,” Devid Gualandris

Yoon Chung Han

Eyes
Eyes is an interactive art installation and a series of biometric data artworks with my previous artwork Digiti Sonus. It’s an interactive biometric data art that transforms human’s Iris data into musical sound and 3D animated image. The idea is to allow the audience to explore their own identities through unique visual and sound generated by their iris patterns based on iris recognition and image processing techniques. As a part of the installation, selected distinctive iris images are printed in 3D sculptures, and it replays the sound generated from the iris data and projects 3D converted image images. The audience members can compare their iris-based sonic results with others, and question the “problem of disembodied identities’ in the digital era through the existence of audiovisual representations of individuals.

Hiroshi Sugihara

Ready to crawl
Ready to Crawl is a project of 3D-printed organic-like robots. By printing everything except the motor as one unit, the robots are born with a completed shape like real creatures. After the robots have been printed by a selective laser sintering machine, excess nylon powder is removed, a motor is inserted, and then they start crawling.
Designer: Hiroshi Sugihara
Project director: Shunji Yamanaka

Behnaz Farahi

Synapse
Synapse is a 3D-printed helmet which moves and illuminates according to brain activity[…] The main intention of this project is to explore the possibilities of multi-material 3D printing in order to produce a shape-changing structure around the body as a second skin. Additionally, the project seeks to explore direct control of the movement with neural commands from the brain so that we can effectively control the environment around us through our thoughts. The environment therefore becomes an extension of our bodies. This project aims to play with the intimacy of our bodies and the environment to the point that the distinction between them becomes blurred, as both have ‘become’ a single entity. The helmet motion is controlled by the Eletroencephalography (EEG) of the brain. A Neurosky’s EEG chip and Mindflex headset have been modified and redesigned in order to create a seamless blend between technology and design.

Esseline Keeven

Esseline is a Biomimicry designer. She draws her designs with nature as a source of inspiration. Her recent designs are inspired by the beautiful shapes and patterns that you see when you look at cells at a microscopic level. The arrangement of lines in her flat design has a major influence on the final bulging of the printed 3D objects.
Photographer: Andy Hendrata

Skylar Tibbits

Rock Print
The world has been “about to be revolutionized” by 3D printing for years now, but aside from rapid prototyping, 3D selfies, and the occasional gimmicky 3D-printed house, we don’t see much of it every day. So why hasn’t this technology revolutionized modern infrastructure? One reason is that it still has to compete with concrete, one of the cheapest, most versatile, and efficiently delivered materials in the history of architecture. At the Chicago Architecture Biennial, Self-Assembly Lab at MIT and Gramazio Kohler Research of ETH Zurich showed off a process that might finally one-up concrete, using only a 3D printing extruder, rocks, string, and smart design.

Zaha Hadid Architects

Rise chair
The two 3D-printed chair, designed by Zaha Hadid Architects principal Patrik Schumacher, will be displayed alongside creations by Welsh industrial designer Ross Lovegrove and London-based designer Daniel Widrig.

Bartlett students

build 3D-printed filigree chair
RC4-CurVoxels
Students: Claudia Tanskanen, Zoe Hwee Tan, Xiaolin Yin and Qianyi Li (INT) Panagiota Spyropoulou, Hyein Lee, Pooja Gosavi, Pratiksha Renake ( Mickey Matter) Hyunchul Kwon, Amreen Kaleel and Xiaolin Li ( CurVoxels), Efstratios Georgiou, Palak Jhunjhunwala, Juan Olaya, Yiheng Ye ( VoxaTile)

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

Sphere Packing
“Sphere Packing” is a series of 3D-printed pieces designed to concentrate the entire musical production of a composer in a single dense multi-channel device. The size of each sphere is directly proportional to how prolific the composer was, for example the sphere for Johann Sebastian Bach has 48 cm diameter and holds 1100 loudspeakers playing simultaneously Bach’s 1100 different compositions, while the sphere for Hildegaard Von Bingen only has 11 cm diameter and 69 loudspeakers. The project presents at a glance the comparative production volume of many composers. As people are a couple metres away from a sphere they hear a quiet murmur of sounds, but as they approach and put their ear up close to individual speakers they can hone in on specific compositions. The series is inspired by American composer Charles Ives’ practice of simultaneity as a compositional tool.

DESIGN STUDIO EMERGING OBJECTS

设计工作室新兴对象
Saltygloo
American studio Emerging Objects 3D-printed this pavilion using salt harvested from San Francisco Bay. “The structure is an experiment in 3D printing using locally harvested salt from the San Francisco Bay to produce a large-scale, lightweight, additive manufactured structures,” said Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello of additive manufacturing startup Emerging Objects. They explained that 500,000 tonnes of sea salt are harvested each year in the San Francisco Bay Area using power from the sun and wind. “The salt is harvested from 109-year-old salt crystallisation ponds in Redwood City,” they said. “These ponds are the final stop in a five-year salt-making process that involves moving bay water through a series of evaporation ponds. In these ponds the highly saline water completes evaporation, leaving 8-12 inches of solid crystallised salt that is then harvested for industrial use.”

LORENZO OGGIANO

Quasi-Objects

ll works are printed using pigment-based inks on Hahnemühle archival paper, variable dimensions, edition of 3+1 ap.
“Quasi-Objects” is an art project consisting of 3d generated videos and prints, a practice of “organic re-design” – started in 2003 and still in progress – that aims to stimulate thought and dialogue on the progressive relativisation of natural forms of life as a result of techno-biological evolution.“Quasi-Objects” regards data actualization, the production of biologically non-functional organisms and ecosystems as transient output of an operative practice: aesthetics of process.
“Life is a real and autonomous process independent from any specific material manifestation.”

MANUELA DONOSO AND LUISA PEREIRA

The Harmonic Series

File Festival

Created by Manuela Donoso and Luisa Pereira, The Harmonic Series is a collection of mechanical devices , software, sculptures and prints that explore the relationship between musical and visual harmony.Inspired by the nineteenth century mathematician Jules Lissajous who invented a device to visualize sound vibrations using two tuning forks and a beam of light reflected from one mirror to the next to a screen, Manuela and Luisa have re-created and extended this experiment using recent tools. An electronic version of the device replaces the tuning forks with microphones and speakers, allowing people to sing different musical intervals, and contrast the resulting figures with the more chaotic ones generated by percussive sounds. An application plays groups of three notes and plots 3d Lissajous figures for their frequency ratios. The frequency ratios for major, minor and diminished chords are 4:5:6, 10:12:15 and 20:24:29 respectively. These chords were plotted using the app, and then printed as posters and sculptures that reveal a tight relationship between aural and visual harmony.