Chris Cheung

No Longer Write – Mochiji
Powered by artificial intelligence’s Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs), the collected works from ancient Chinese Calligraphers, including Wang Xizhi, Dong Qichang, Rao Jie, Su Shi, Huang Tingjian, Wang Yangming, as input data for deep learning. Strokes, scripts and style of the masters are blended and visualized in “Mochiji”, a Chinese literature work paying tribute to Wang Xizhi. Wang is famous for his hard work in the pursuit of Chinese calligraphy. He kept practicing calligraphy near the pond and eventually turned the pond for brush washing into an ink pond (Mochi). The artwork provides a platform for participants to write and record their handwriting. After a participant finished writing the randomly assigned script from “Mochiji”, the input process is completed and the deep learning process will begin. The newly collected scripts will be displayed on the screen like floating ink on the pond, and slowly merge with other collected data to present a newly learnt script. The ink pond imitates process of machine learning, which observes, compares and filters inputs through layers of image and text, to form a modern edition of “Mochiji”.
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不再写 – Mochiji
以人工智能的生成对抗网络(GANs)为动力,将王羲之、董其昌、饶捷、苏轼、黄廷健、王阳明等中国古代书法家的作品作为深度学习的输入数据。向王羲之致敬的中国文学作品《麻糬》,将大师的笔触、文字、风格融为一体,形象化。王先生以对中国书法的刻苦钻研而著称。他一直在池塘边练习书法,最终把洗笔池变成了墨池(麻糬)。艺术作品为参与者提供了一个书写和记录他们笔迹的平台。参与者完成“Mochiji”中随机分配的脚本后,输入过程完成,深度学习过程将开始。新收集到的脚本会像池塘上的浮墨一样显示在屏幕上,并与其他收集到的数据慢慢融合,呈现出新学到的脚本。墨池模仿机器学习的过程,通过图像和文本的层层观察、比较和过滤输入,形成现代版的“年糕”。

 

Liam Johnson

Liam was chosen for the scholarship by lead designer at Alexander McQueen, Sarah Burton. He spent his year in industry in Paris, working at Maison Margiela under John Galliano, working personally with the designer on both the artisanal and ready-to-wear collections. As a designer, his own collections often centre upon alternatives to normal fashion and instead offer remodelled silhouettes, bright colours, unexpected textures and sculptural, exaggerated forms.

ARAKAWA + GINS

Yoro Park – Site of Reversible Destiny
“The couple first fully explored Reversible Destiny in what is regarded as their seminal gallery piece, “The Mechanism of Meaning,” an ever-evolving manifesto-cum-artwork begun in 1963, comprising 80 panels that they refined and added to over decades, many of them high-concept diagrams and puzzles with instructions and text (“A Mnemonic Device for Forgetting,” “Think One, Say Two”), made primarily of acrylic and mixed media on canvas. In an accompanying précis to the work, which was exhibited at the Guggenheim in 1997, they prescribed “no more irretrievable disappearances” and declared death “old-fashioned.” Critical opinion differs on how seriously the pair, whose work is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art and Paris’s Centre Pompidou, took the grandiose quest to end death. But if it was intended as metaphor, neither of them ever let on. Indeed, though Arakawa himself died at 73, in 2010, and Gins four years later, at the age of 72, defying death became the defining work of their lives.”

Maurizio Bolognini

SMSMS-SMS Mediated Sublime

CIMs-Collective Intelligence Machines

“In 2000, I began to connect some of these computers to the mobile phone network (SMSMS-SMS Mediated Sublime, and CIMs-Collective Intelligence Machines). This enabled me to make interactive and multiple installations, connecting various locations.
In this case the flow of images was made visible by large-scale video-projections and the members of the audience were able to modify their characteristics in real time, by sending new inputs to the system from their own phones. This was done in a similar way to certain applications used in electronic democracy. What I had in mind was art which was generative, interactive and public.”

gordon matta clark

Anarchitecture

splitting house

“Of the many shows at the fabled 112 Greene Street gallery—an artistic epicenter of New York’s downtown scene in the 1970s—the Anarchitecture group show of March 1974 has been the subject of the most enduring discussion, despite a complete lack of documentation about it. Anarchitecture has become a foundational myth, but one that remains to be properly understood. Stemming from a series of meetings organized by Gordon Matta-Clark and reflecting his long-standing interest in architecture, the Anarchitecture exhibition was conceived as an anonymous group statement in photographs about the intersection of art and building. But did it actually happen? It exists only through oblique archival traces and the memories of the participants. Cutting Matta-Clark investigates the Anarchitecture group as a kind of collective research seminar, through extensive interviews with the protagonists and a dossier of all the available evidence. The dossier includes a collection of Matta-Clark’s aphoristic “art cards,” the 96 photographs that were produced by the various participants for possible inclusion in the exhibition, and images from a recently unearthed video of Matta-Clark’s now famous bus trip to see Splitting in Englewood, New Jersey.” Mark Wigley

Move Lab

Who Wants To Be A Self Driving Car?

The moovel lab collaborated with MESO Digital Interiors to prototype this immersive experience. The idea was to make a machine that replaces the human senses with the sensors that a self-driving car might use. Our unconventional driving machine is essentially a steel-frame buggy with in-wheel, electric motors, complete with hydraulic breaking. Drivers lay head first on the vehicle; the positioning used to enhance the feeling of immersion (and vulnerability) created during the experience. A physical steering wheel controls the turning of the vehicle.The VR experience is created using data collected by the sensors outfitted on the driving machine.

Yegor Zaitsev

Fall-winter 2010 moscow – womenswear catwalks
The Russian fashion rebel Yegor Zaitsev presented an avant-garde collection which was surprisingly romantic.
Yegor took classic silhouettes extended them, volumized them, turned them upside down and made them into works of art.

RAFAEL LOZANO-HEMMER

РАФАЭЛЬ ЛОЗАНО-ХЕММЕР
拉斐尔·洛萨诺 – 亨默
ラファエル·ロサノ=ヘメル
라파엘 로자노
רפאל לוזאנו, המר
Open Air
Depending on atmospheric conditions, Open Air could be seen up to 10 miles away from the Parkway each evening from 8 to 11 p.m. The Project Information Center at Eakins Oval was equipped with app download, free mobile loan stations and seating areas for watching the lights and listening to the messages. There was also be an Information Outpost located at Sister Cities Park (18th Street and Logan Square).The Open Air voice archive also features selected “Voices of Philly,” recorded messages from distinct individuals both past and present who have inspired and influenced the flavor of Philadelphia. “Voices of Philly” messages are accessible on this website and were played at various times throughout the project. Content for “Voices of Philly” was collected by project partner WHYY executive producer Elisabeth Perez-Luna and includes David Lynch, Sonia Sanchez, Sun Ra, Louis Kahn, M. Night Shyamalan, Tina Fey, ?uestlove, Marcel Duchamp, Buckminster Fuller, Jimmy Heath, Santigold, Maurice Sendak, Patti LaBelle and many more.

Vincent Lapp

“To me couture is the best source of excitement in fashion. Our debut collection was mix between couture orientated fashion and ready-to-wear. With AV Couture, I hope to create a true couture atelier, which stands for traditional craftsmanship and perfection.
Working for my own label was always my biggest dream. AV Couture is an instrument to visualize our thoughts, and all the society’s absurdities we think are essential to tackle.” Vincent Lapp

Berenike Corcuera

Berenike Corcuera’s collection was inspired by kirilian photographs of her aura, first captured in Chinatown’s reowned Magic Jewelry. when she lived in New York in 2014. She began studying the electromagnetic field of the human body to understand how to translate the invisible. She began the practice of mandala and colour studies, to understand how metaphysical bodies could be interpreted into physical bodies and contemporary menswear clothing.

Nicole Zisman

I frequently entertain the idea that everything we perceive might actually not be real at all, that the world around me could actually just be my senses lying to me. The idea that “reality is a hoax” completely freaks me out, so naturally it became the concrete starting point for my collection. From this, I began to develop different ways of “imagining” garments, of finding ways of putting things that are not really there into existence. I wanted to blur the lines of real versus imagined//artificial. Print was the best facilitator of this goal.

Shu Lea Cheang

Avatar of the artist
Taiwan in Venice 2019
“For those who don’t know her, Shu Lea Cheang is a figure of Net art and the cyberfeminist movement that emerged in the 1990s. Living in New York at the time, she was also an active member of the activist video collective Paper Tiger Television (as was French filmmaker Nathalie Magnan). Since then, Cheang’s work has dealt with “concerns including sex, futures, gender, ecology, money, media, and food [to] encompass film, installation, online work, social processes, and direct intervention in the sociopolitical, technical and aesthetic systems, and the imaginaries which co-compose them,” writes Matthew Fuller

Marguerite Humeau

High Tide
For her show High Tide, which was most recently exhibited at the Centre Pompidou, Humeau sculptured a collection of futuristic marine mammals and set about imagining what they might sound like if they could recount complex narratives. With mechanical clicks and whistles, similar to those made by whales and dolphins, Humeau’s creations tell of a great flood – an apocalyptic deluge that sparked the birth of their culture. “These floods”, she explains, “might be the consequence of climate change and rising oceans and the air becoming toxic. Maybe the great flood is actually us. As humans, we are the flood.”

katie paterson

hollow
Katie Paterson and Zeller & Moye’s public artwork, Hollow, is made out of 10,000 samples of different tree species and was unveiled in Bristol in early May. The BBC followed Katie over a ten-month period as she assembled the wood collection and created the artwork. Sourced from all around the world, her samples include the oldest tree in the world, a tree that survived a nuclear blast and many trees that are now extinct.

ANDREW HIERONYMI

move
File Festival
MOVE is an interactive installation divided into six distinct modules, JUMP, AVOID, CHASE, THROW, HIDE and COLLECT. Each module offers a single-user interaction, based on a verb corresponding to the action the participant is invited to perform. Each verb corresponds to a common procedure acted out by avatars during videogame play. Each module offers an interaction with abstracted shapes (circles, rectangles) behaving according to simplified rules of physics (collision, friction). Each module is color-coded with consistency, where the color red is used for the graphical element that poses the core challenge. Each module increases difficulty in a similar linear manner.What makes MOVE unusual is that unlike most computer vision or sensor based games like Eye-toy or Dance Dance Revolution, the participant IS the avatar, he is not seeing a representation of herself or an indirect result of her actions on a separate screen but instead interacts directly with the projected graphical constituents of the game. Because those graphical elements are non-representational they do not allow for a projection in a fictional space. The combination of abstracted shapes and direct interaction reinforces in the player the focus on the action itself (JUMP, AVOID, CHASE, THROW, HIDE or COLLECT) instead of an ulterior goal.

ALWIN NIKOLAIS

Noumenon

A truly universal artist, the American Alwin Nikolais (1910-1993) devoted his life to a radical form of staged art he called “dance theater.” Inspired (perhaps unconsciously) by the experiments of Bauhaus members such as Oskar Schlemmer and László Moholy-Nagy in the 1920s, Nikolais devised a style of abstract dance that encompassed costumes, stage sets, choreography, lighting, and music, all under his control. Also in 1963, Nikolais met analog synthesizer pioneer Robert Moog, who was at the time just starting his business in New York. He was fascinated by the sounds of Moog’s machines, and with the money provided by a a Guggenheim Fellowship, Nikolais bought the first ever commercially produced Moog synthesizer. It was the primary sound-source for all of Nikolais’ scores from 1963 to 1975. The instrument is now housed at the Stearns Collection of Musical Instruments at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.