GEORGE REDHAWK

جورج ريدهاوك
乔治·红鹰

file festival
Native American GIF artist George Redhawk aka DarkAngel0ne, who is blind, uses them to “see” art. With the help of visual aides and using photo manipulation software designed for the visually impaired, Redhawk creates eerily captivating versions of his favorite paintings and photographs.

MSHR

Threshold Release Ornament
MSHR is the art collective of Birch Cooper and Brenna Murphy. The duo collaboratively builds and explores systems composed of sound, light, sculpture, software and circuitry. Their practice is a self-transforming cybernetic entity with its outputs patched into its inputs, the resulting emergent form serving as its navigational system. These outputs primarily take the form of installations and performances that integrate interface design with generative systems and a distinctive formalist approach. MSHR’s name is a modular acronym, designed to hold varied ideas over time. MSHR emerged from the art collective Oregon Painting Society in 2011 in Portland, Oregon, USA.

ROBERT WILSON

بوب ويلسون
鲍伯·威尔逊
בוב וילסון
ロバート·ウィルソン
밥 윌슨
Боб Уилсон
VOOM PORTRAITS
ISABELLA ROSSELLINI

…Robert Wilson does not portray only famous personalities, such as Isabella Rossellini, Brad Pitt, or Caroline von Monaco, but also unknown people and animals who have until now escaped artistic representation, such as a street dancer or a frog. In precisely these stagings, Wilson’s complex visual and sound languages reach their climax, namely, a celebration of empathy: anonymous people become divas, neutral beings achieve cult status. Wilson’s video portraits thus have a cognitive function. Within the history of portrait painting and photographic portraits, especially staged photography, his staged portraits present not only a pinnacle of accomplishment, but also, first and foremost, a climax that is groundbreaking.

clement valla

Valla claimed to have collected a series of 60 “surrealistic” images, or that, at least, give that impression, during a long period “playing” in Google Earth.“The images are a kind of mirrors for a fun house.They are strange illusions and reflections of the real ”Despite the strong distortions, which easily resemble a surrealist painting, the images of the work do not have any manipulation of tools like Photoshop, for example.”The images are screenshots of Earth with basic color adjustments”, “This is a construction of 3D maps on two-dimensional bases, creating these fabulous and unintended distortions”.

FRANCK SORBIER

On stage, the ample white strapless dress of a still model serves as a screen for all kinds of projections that echo those of a big screen in the background. “Mixing 3D video with certified fairy tale stories and tailoring tradition” is the idea of the atypical Mountain Ash. Intel technology brings to life on the fabric all kinds of patterns simulating embroidery or painting on silk: stripes of neon lights, butterflies flapping their wings, “mapping” of crystal tassels or the northern lights …

 

Michiko Tsuda

YOU WOULD COME BACK THERE TO SEE ME AGAIN THE FOLLOWING DAY
This installation utilizes mirrors and video cameras combined with various types of frame, a motif often discussed in the context of the history of painting and film. The title is a typical English sentence in free indirect speech (by what is normally a third-person subject). With the object of “there” and “following day” varying with the context, this title reflects the experience of viewers, whose relationship to their image and to the space raises questions about the meaning of “here” and “now.”

FONG QI WEI

Flypast Sunset
“In this series of animated artworks, which are essentially slowed down versions of the series Time in Motion, I invite you to experience the passage of moments across a landscape. Perhaps understanding that even though all moments are transient, all moments are equally worthy of our respect because they are parts of a larger whole. Each Time Loop is made manually. I captured every moment across a sunset or sunrise using a digital camera, and manually stitched these moments into Time Paintings. Finally, different sequential time paintings were put together to create a sense of motion  almost imperceptible in some of the works, in the manner of clouds drifting across a sky.” Fong Qi Wei

Marleen Sleeuwits

INTERIOR N0. 58

Primarily working within abandoned office spaces, her process involves stripping the rooms down to their individual components, laying bare the layers found beneath the surfaces. She then re-assembles the room using materials found on-site, such as fluorescent tubes, paper towels, laminate, and tape, by adapting techniques of sculpture, painting and drawing.

Émilie Brout & Maxime Marion

Lightning Ride
“With Lightning Ride, it is now poles of technology, organics and mysticism that collide with  electricity as a connecting point. The video is produced from excerpts of “Taser Certifications”, a sort of ceremony authorizing in the United States the use of Tasers in the condition of being tased by someone else. Filtered with the Photoshop’s “oil painting effect”, slowed down and accompanied by a disturbing soundtrack, the succeeding images show us bodies and faces whose deformations and positions evoke a feeling of pain as well as a Christian ecstacy. Everything unfolds as if the miracle of electricity, symbol of the rationalization of the world, revived paradoxically an aspiration to transcendence, antipodes joining each other and disappearing in profit of a new map of possibilities.” (Sarah Ihler-Meyer)

Regine Schumann

colormirror dornbirn
Regine Schumann is a minimalist artist who works with Light Art, initially inspired by Color Field Painting and artists as Mark Rothko, Donald Judd and Dan Flavin. Schumann’s boxes and installations are made of acrylic colour plates especially produced for her. Her work is more than just Concrete Art. Conceptualized as emotive spaces, Schumann’s colour– lled light rooms provoke intense feelings of something otherworldly. Her minimalistic approach affects everything from her choice of materials to the way she plays with form and colour.

Sara Ludy

cloud pond

“Ludy’s toxic cloud shapes are featured more predominantly in this room, morphing into figures that look bacterial. They are both meditative and threatening as they swell and heave with no identifiable pattern. Ludy’s works are also surrounded by digital frames adding a classical sophistication to her contemporary digital pictures.” Shauna Jean Doherty

SAM TAYLOR WOOD

a little death

Despite the broader reference to the traditional pictorial genre of “still life”, disseminated from the Dutch and Spanish painters of the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, ‘Still life’ from 2001 and ‘A little death’ from 2002 refer especially to the painting of transient elements of the French Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin (1699-1779) to discuss the distortion and inexorability of time, the finitude of life or, above all, the interdependence between life and death. The title makes a direct reference to the expression with which the French philosopher Georges Bataille defined the orgasm: ‘une petite mort‘.

Michael Manning

迈克尔·曼宁
Most known for his series Phone Arts and Microsoft Store Paintings, these works explore the boundaries and limitations of stock image making software like Microsoft Paint. Manning uses these technologies to create his digital works, that are Abstract Expressionist in nature but persistent in their idiosyncratic Manning aesthetic. While these works begin as JPEGS, they are then printed onto canvas and brushed with a clear acrylic for texture, able to transcend the screen into the three dimensional gallery.

ANDREI TARKOVSKY

أندريه تاركوفسكي
塔可夫斯基
アンドレイ·タルコフスキー
Андрей Тарковский
Solaris
In Solaris (1972), Andrei Tarkovsky presents a vision of contemporary society as one that has become cut off from nature, and provides a narrative that illustrates the possibility of remaining human in the inhuman world that is the result. The film contrasts a life-affirming natural landscape to an urban, constructed landscape where the natural world is submerged and invisible. The Solaris space station is both a projection of this second, inhuman, landscape and an allegory for Tarkovsky’s view of urban life. The narrative of the film concerns the journey by the central character, Kris Kelvin (Donatas Banionis), from emotional deadness to a rediscovery of his humanity as he charts a course between these two worlds, and the role that art, whether painting, music or film, plays in this.
cinema full

simon colton

The Painting Fool

The Painting Fool is software that we hope will one day be taken seriously as a creative artist in its own right. This aim is being pursued as an Artificial Intelligence (AI) project, with the hope that the technical difficulties overcome along the way will lead to new and improved generic AI techniques. It is also being pursued as a sociological project, where the effect of software which might be deemed as creative is tested in the art world and the wider public. In this chapter, we summarise our progress so far in The Painting Fool project. To do this, we first compare and contrast The Painting Fool with software of a similar nature arising from AI and graphics projects. We follow this with a discussion of the guiding principles from Computational Creativity research that we adhere to in building the software.

manuel rossner

surprisingly this rather works
“Surprisingly This Rather Works” is a spatial intervention at ST. AGNES / KÖNIG GALERIE and at the same time a virtual extension of its exterior. The entire gallery is transformed into a gaming environment inspired by the 1990s game show “American Gladiators” and so-called gyms that are used for cutting-edge research in artificial intelligence by companies such as Open AI in San Francisco.
The visitor turns into an avatar and interacts with objects that are part of a parcours. These objects broaden the perspective on what painting and sculpture can be in the digital realm.

REBECCA WARD

APPARITION
Materiality and process are central to Rebecca Ward’s practice and evoke “architectural garments” ripped, unwoven, and re-stitched from fleshtoned canvas duck, leather hide, and silk organza. In her canvas works, the artist removes the weft (horizontal) threads of the fabric to reveal the underlying stretcher bars, highlighting the physical structure of the painting itself. Ward’s artworks reveal and obscure, and by their nature, entice viewers to closely investigate contrasts in line and material, modulations in color, and multi-dimensional layers.

Birch Cooper and Brenna Murphy

MSHR is a collaborative project by New York-based artists Birch Cooper and Brenna Murphy. The duo produces sculptural synthesizers, ritualistic installations and performances that use light and audio feedback to generate sensory experiences. MSHR emerged in 2011 from the five-person art collective Oregon Painting Society.

Jean Tinguely

让汤格利
ז’אן טינגלי
ジャン·ティンゲリー
장 팅겔리
ЖАН ТИНГЕЛИ
03823 Metamechanical Sculpture with Tripod

Born in Fribourg (1925) and passed away in Berne (1991), Jean Tinguely is a Swiss painter-scultpor usually associated with the kinetic art and the Nouveau Réalisme. After a short period of abstract painting, he turned towards the mechanical sculpture. From 1951, he assembles strange robotic machines working on the physical and perceptive movement.

Tina Schulz

Tina Schulz was born in 1975 in Munich, Germany. Drawings, paintings, sculptures, videos and exhibition installations are as much the tools for her conceptual approach as are her writings. After studying German studies at the LMU in Munich she studies Fine Arts within Astrid Kleins’ class at the HGB Leipzig, where she majors in 2004, and where she teaches until 2008. She runs the LIGA Produzentengalerie in Berlin in 2002/2003 and writes broadly about artist colleagues. In 2009 and 2010 residencies lead her to Paris, Brussels and Los Angeles. Since 2011 she lives and works in Brussels.

JOHN MCCRACKEN

ДЖОН МАК-КРАКЕН
约翰·麦克拉肯
ジョン·マクラッケン
Untitled (Black Block)

John McCracken (1934-2011) developed his early sculptural work while studying painting at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland in the late 1950s and early 1960s. While experimenting with increasingly three-dimensional canvases, the artist began to produce objects made with industrial materials, including plywood, sprayed lacquer, and pigmented resin, creating the highly reflective, smooth surfaces that he was to become known for.

MAR CANET & CARLES GUTIERREZ

videomaton
File Festival

The initial idea was to engage audiences with the classical paintings. The installation tries to transform the classical portraits into memorable and playful experiences. In short, by looking into a mirror a face of participant is captured by the system. Next, the captured face travels into one of the classical portraits. Hence, the viewer is invited into the gallery in order to recognize him or herself in one of the paintings. In other words, the art piece replaces the original painted faces by the faces of the audience. To be more specific, the authors have created an original face-morphing that integrates itself into the well-know portraits, like Meninas by Goya. To put in a nutshell, the common experience of modern art is replaced by a novel, playful and enjoyable encounter. The installation creates a framework of expression where audience spontaneously and freely interact in front of a mirror knowing that they are recorded. The results are experience by all audience in the gallery. The project was produced in 2011 as a commission of interactive art project for the new City Council of Madrid curated by Chema Conesa. “Videomaton” was presented in the opening of new City Council of Madrid located in the Cibeles square. The installation was exhibited for a year in the institution. The aim of the exhibit was displaying the famous art pieces of Madrid museums in a novel way.

JOHN MCCRACKEN

Джон Мак-Кракен
约翰·麦克拉肯
ジョン·マクラッケン
Star, Infinite, Dimension, and Electron

“The geometric forms McCracken employed were typically built from straight lines: cubes, rectangular slabs and rods, stepped or quadrilateral pyramids, post-and-lintel structures and, most memorably, tall planks that lean against the wall. Usually, the form is painted in sprayed lacquer, which does not reveal the artist’s hand. An industrial look is belied by sensuous color.His palette included bubble-gum pink, lemon yellow, deep sapphire and ebony, usually applied as a monochrome. Sometimes an application of multiple colors marbleizes or runs down the sculpture’s surface, like a molten lava flow. He also made objects of softly stained wood or, in recent years, highly polished bronze and reflective stainless steel.Embracing formal impurity at a time when purity was highly prized, the works embody perceptual and philosophical conundrums. The colored planks stand on the floor like sculptures; rely on the wall for support like paintings; and, bridging both floor and wall, define architectural space. Their shape is resolutely linear, but the point at which the line assumes the dimensional properties of a shape is indefinable.” Christopher Knight