Steve Reich

スティーヴ・ライヒ
סטיב רייך
스티브 라이히
СТИВ РАЙХ
Pendulum Music

Reich came up with the concept while working at the University of Colorado. He was swinging a live microphone in the style of the cowboy’s lasso, and noting the produced feedback, he composed for an “orchestra” of microphones.Three or more microphones are suspended above the speakers by means of a cable and stand. The microphones are pulled back, switched on, and released over the speaker, and gravity causes them to swing back and forth as pendulums. As the microphone nears the speaker, a feedback tone is created. Different lengths of cable will swing at different speeds, creating an overlapping series of feedback squeals. The music created is thus the result of the process of the swinging microphones.

STEVE REICH

スティーヴ・ライヒ
סטיב רייך
스티브 라이히
СТИВ РАЙХ
The Desert Music
Steve Reich – The Desert Music (with Kristjan Järvi & MDR Leipzig Radio Symphony Orchestra)
They can imitate you
But they can’t duplicate you
Cause you got something special
That makes me wanna taste you
I want it all day long
I’m addicted like it’s wrong
I want it all day long
I’m addicted like it’s wrong
They can imitate you
But they can’t duplicate you
Cause you got something special
That makes me wanna taste you
I want it all day long
I’m addicted like it’s wrong
I want it all day long
I’m addicted like it’s…

JIRI KYLIAN – STEVE REICH

イリ·キリアン – スティーヴ·ライヒ
יירי קיליאן – סטיב רייך
Иржи Килиана – Стив Райх
Falling Angels
Falling Angels was created in 1989 as one Kylián’s Black and White Ballets. The Black and White ballets consisted of six pieces, with Falling Angel being dance 6. It is choreographed to Steve Reich’s Drumming (Part One) created in 1971, which was based on ceremonial ritual music from Ghana (West Africa). Throughout Fallen Angels there is the use of mesmeric choral movement and repeated phrases. Falling Angels is for 8 women and depicts female dancers in their aim to achieve perfection but succumb in various stages to the human female psyche and female events such as ambition, seduction, pregnancy, birth, death, motherhood and self-awareness. Kylián was influenced by surrealism and minimalism during the creation of this work and the ‘black and white ballets’. In this ballet we see the combination of classical lines and sharp percussive movements that give unpredictability to the piece as a whole

STEVE REICH

スティーヴ・ライヒ
סטיב רייך
스티브 라이히
Стив Райх
Different Trains

STEVE REICH

スティーヴ・ライヒ
סטיב רייך
스티브 라이히
Стив Райх
Proverb

STEVE REICH

スティーヴ・ライヒ
סטיב רייך
스티브 라이히
Стив Райх
Vermont Counterpoint
Vermont Counterpoint (1982) a été commandé par le flûtiste Ransom Wilson et est dédié à Betty Freeman. Il est composé pour trois flûtes alto, trois flûtes, trois piccolos et une partie solo, tous préenregistrés sur bande, plus une partie solo en direct. Le soliste en direct joue de la flûte alto, de la flûte et du piccolo et participe au contrepoint en cours ainsi qu’à des mélodies plus étendues. La pièce pourrait être interprétée par onze flûtistes, mais elle est principalement destinée à un solo avec bande. La durée est d’environ dix minutes. Dans ce laps de temps relativement court, quatre sections dans quatre touches différentes, avec la troisième dans un tempo plus lent, sont présentées. Les techniques de composition utilisées consistent principalement à construire des canons entre de courts motifs mélodiques répétitifs en substituant des notes à des silences, puis en jouant des mélodies qui résultent de leur combinaison. Ces mélodies ou motifs mélodiques qui en résultent deviennent alors la base de la section suivante au fur et à mesure que les autres parties environnantes de la bande contrapuntique disparaissent. Bien que les techniques utilisées en incluent plusieurs que j’ai découvertes dès 1967, la vitesse de changement relativement rapide (il y a rarement plus de trois répétitions d’une mesure), la modulation métrique dans et hors d’un tempo plus lent, et des changements de clé relativement rapides peuvent bien créer une impression plus concentrée et concise.

Steve Reich

Glenn Branca

Lesson Nº 1 + The Ascension
Glenn Branca has always been a musician positioned halfway between the role of avant-garde composer and that of a rock musician. A pupil and disciple of the masters of American minimalism such as La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Philip Glass and Steve Reich, he has always had to fight against prejudice and fierce criticism. His position was certainly uncomfortable, too academic for rock fans and too “politically incorrect” for academics. In fact, Branca was trying to unhinge all the limits imposed by the rigid schemes of the avant-garde, aware of the fact that those who want to be truly avant-garde should have no limits. John Cage was also able to criticize him, even calling him a fascist ( Luciano Berio also did so for all minimalists) for the excessive rigidity of his compositions, even though he recognized his innovative power. After having created his best known album, The Ascension (1981), a true monument of maximalism played with a classical rock formation (guitars, bass and drums), he tries to approach a different format, the Symphony, as always halfway between rock and academia. Branca will like the experiment and will re-propose it several times in the following decades, to date there are sixteen symphonies (not all recordings are available). Here is how young Branca’s ensemble appeared to the American composer John Adams in one of his first live performances of the First Symphony: “Branca’s event that I listened to at the Japan Center Theater in San Francisco in 1981 was one of his symphonies for guitar . The group didn’t look very different from thousands of other independent or alternative rock bands of the time: guys in jeans and worn t-shirts busy with cables while maintaining that typical distracted expression of rock musicians.

 

ANNE TERESA DE KEERSMAEKER

rain (full)
rosas and ictus
music: steve reich
The 70-minute piece is a response to Steve Reich’s minimalist composition Music for 18 Musicians, played live here by the Ictus Ensemble. As De Keersmaeker has demonstrated in works such as Fase and Drumming, she’s fascinated by the architecture of Reich’s compositions and the challenge of creating movement that reflects it. more..

Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker

アンヌ·テレサ·ドゥ·ケースマイケル
АННЫ ТЕРЕЗЫ ДЕ КЕЕРСМАКЕР
Drumming Live

In 1998, Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker created “Drumming” for the dancers of her company “Rosas”. This intense and jubilant piece is set to haunting music by Steve Reich, a pioneer of minimalist music. On stage, nine dancers perform an exhausting choreography with swirling rhythms that reveal a deep and vital energy. Today, almost twenty years later, it is the turn of the Paris Opera Ballet’s dancers to adopt it. For the occasion, the choreographer talks to us about this extreme piece.

Laurie Spiegel

the expanding universe
The Expanding Universe is the classic 1980 debut album by composer and computer music pioneer Laurie Spiegel. The pieces comprising The Expanding Universe combine slowly evolving textures with the emotional richness of intricate counterpoint, harmony, and complex rhythms (John Fahey and J. S. Bach are both cited as major influences in the original cover’s notes), all built of electronic sounds. These works, often grouped with those of Terry Riley, Phil Glass, Steve Reich, differ in their much shorter, clear forms. Composed and realized between 1974 and 1977 on the GROOVE system developed by Max Mathews and F.R. Moore at Bell Laboratories, the pieces on this album were far ahead of their time both in musical content and in how they were made.

MICHAEL LANGAN & TERAH MAHER

Music by Steve Reich
Choros

Iannis Xenakis

Oresteia Opera

Scored for soloists, mixed chorus, children’s chorus and chamber ensemble, Iannis Xenakis’ music for Oresteia has been cited as “ruggedly dissonant” since its 1987 première in Sicily. A wooden-planked stage is empty save three platforms, one each for the chamber players and percussion, another for a drummer on a separate perch. On a high screen to start, a loop video shows an almost-naked woman stretched out face down in a bathtub who is being hosed down uninterruptedly with water. No forewarning, and the clip changes to a thick forest, a small girl being physically abused by an adult man. While the same video images reappear at the end of the opera, but it’s nebulous soft-edged shapes –mood landscapes as it were – that are the usual backdrop for the 90-minute piece.

 

ROB KOVACS

steven reich
Piano Phase

Not having two pianos at his disposal, Reich experimented by first recording a piano part on tape, and then trying to play mostly in sync with the recording, albeit with slight shifts, or phases, with occasional re-alignments of the twelve successive notes against each other. Reich found the experience satisfying, showing that a musician can phase with concentration.