MEMO AKTEN

Body Paint
File Festival

The interaction is simple, movement creates paint. Hidden in the simplicity are layers of subtle details. Different aspects of the motion: size, speed, acceleration, curvature, all have an effect on the outcome: strokes, splashes, drips, spirals; and is left up to the users to play and discover. The installation is designed to work with any number of people and is scalable to cover small or large areas. While the installation is suitable for a single user, when multiple users are present a new dynamic emerges. A user-to-user interaction is born when the audience starts playing with each other via the installation, throwing virtual paint on each other, trying to complete or destroy each other’s paintings.

Teamlab

The Infinite Crystal Universe
Pointillism uses an accumulation of distinct dots of color to create a picture. Here, light points are used to create three-dimensional objects. The light sculpture extends infinitely in all directions. People use their smartphones to select elements to throw The Infinite Crystal Universe. These elements are reborn in three dimensions, creating the artwork. The presence of people and their location within the work affect these three-dimensional elements, which in turn influence and are influenced by other elements in the space. This artwork is forever evolving, changing from moment to moment due to the people in the space.

Klaus Obermaier

克劳斯奥伯迈尔
the concept of … (here and now)

In front of a giant screen, two dancers interact with a cohort of cameras… Their movements are captured by infra-red sensors and projected onto the screen, whereby their bodies become the canvas on which new images take shape. The result is a shifting kaleidoscope of strange, living, quasi-mathematical visual worlds which sometimes seem to be emanating or even escaping from the dancers’ bodies. “Who decides which movement to make: the man or the machine?” Blurring the line between the real and the virtual, Klaus Obermaier loves to subsume his performers’ bodies and physicality in a disconcerting digital universe. With his latest creation, the choreographer/artist has taken a bold new step. He has constructed a system of projectors and infra-red sensor-cameras, trained upon the movements of two dancers. The performers thus find themselves thrown headlong into a living, moving graphical universe: their movements are projected onto the screen, but at the same time their bodies are illuminated by more projected images. This is a true artistic performance, pushing well beyond the frontiers of a standard dance recital, or even a contemporary dance show. A corporeal, temporal performance. A choreography which makes subtle use of its raw materials, deftly combining lights, video, perspectives and the real-time power of bodily movement.

Wang & Söderström

Growth
Wang & Söderström is a Copenhagen based transdisciplinary duo composed of Swedish designer Anny Wang and architect Tim Söderström. The bridging of the physical and digital realms is a major theme in their practice and they are constantly trying to challenge the boundaries between them. Fluctuating between art and design, Wang & Söderström wants to throw out pre-existing conventions regarding the digital and put emphasis on the emotional and tactile side of materials, objects and textures to give the digital a more human-relatable quality and create more meaningful connections. “By 3D scanning elements from nature, like tree trunks, leaves and plants and mixing it with surrealistic materials and behaviors, we wanted to let them continue to grow in a digital environment.”

Jordan Wolfson

요르단 울프슨
ジョーダンウォルフソン
Colored sculpture
“Colored Sculpture” is a work in animatronic that becomes a mechanical theatre, with its spectacular performance brings us reflections on a dark past that we want to reject.“With a highly polished appearance, the work is suspended with heavy chains from a large mechanized gantry, programmed to choreograph his movements. The sheer physicality of the installation, which fills the entire space of the gallery and includes the work being hoisted and thrown hard on the floor, viscerally obscures the distinction between figuration and abstraction, in addition to promoting the formal and narrative possibilities of sculpture. “

Andrea Ling

The Wild Swans

The project is the creation of a series of kinetic garments that tell the story of “The Wild Swans” by Hans Christian Anderson. In the fairy tale, 11 princes have been turned into swans from a transformative spell cast by their wicked stepmother. Their sister, the princess, rescues the princes by collecting stinging nettles and knitting them, under a vow of silence and in great pain, into magical shirts so that her brothers can return to their human shape. She is very nearly done knitting them all when she runs out of time; she throws the sweaters onto her brothers to transform them, but the last one is incomplete, leaving her youngest brother forever with a swan’s wing instead of an arm.

John Adams

Doctor Atomic
Batter My Heart
Gerald Finley (J. Robert Oppenheimer)
Batter my heart, three person’d God; For you
As yet but knock, breathe, knock, breathe, knock, breathe
Shine, and seek to mend;
Batter my heart, three person’d God;
That I may rise, and stand, o’erthrow me, and bend
Your force, to break, blow, break, blow, break, blow
burn and make me new.

ANDREW HIERONYMI

move
File Festival
MOVE is an interactive installation divided into six distinct modules, JUMP, AVOID, CHASE, THROW, HIDE and COLLECT. Each module offers a single-user interaction, based on a verb corresponding to the action the participant is invited to perform. Each verb corresponds to a common procedure acted out by avatars during videogame play. Each module offers an interaction with abstracted shapes (circles, rectangles) behaving according to simplified rules of physics (collision, friction). Each module is color-coded with consistency, where the color red is used for the graphical element that poses the core challenge. Each module increases difficulty in a similar linear manner.What makes MOVE unusual is that unlike most computer vision or sensor based games like Eye-toy or Dance Dance Revolution, the participant IS the avatar, he is not seeing a representation of herself or an indirect result of her actions on a separate screen but instead interacts directly with the projected graphical constituents of the game. Because those graphical elements are non-representational they do not allow for a projection in a fictional space. The combination of abstracted shapes and direct interaction reinforces in the player the focus on the action itself (JUMP, AVOID, CHASE, THROW, HIDE or COLLECT) instead of an ulterior goal.

RACHEL PERRY WELTY

雷切尔·佩里韦尔蒂
Lost In My Life
American artist Rachel Perry Welty makes use of the scads of everyday items we tend to throw away in her new ‘Lost in my Life’ series. She layers the often overlooked items to create a whole new textured landscape. “Most of us don’t pay much attention to the mundane objects we use everyday,” explains Welty, “like the twist ties that hold the plastic wrap on our bread and the broccoli together or the little paper cups that we pull out of a water dispenser.”

JONATHAN SCHIPPER

Measuring Angst
Measuring Angst is a robotic sculptural installation by artist Jonathan Schipper that simulates the mundane act of throwing a glass bottle across a room into a brick wall. The event happens in slow motion, taking nearly 12 minutes to complete as the bottle rotates slowly through the gallery space and then gradually explodes into smaller fragments before rewinding and starting again.

ELLINOR ERICSSON

A student from Danish Design School, Ellinor Ericsson has designed a chair called TubeMe which was exhibited on the Stockholm Furniture Fair 2011. In designer’s words, “The TubeMe chair is about a tactile interaction with a chair. You are able to braid the naked chair with pillow tubes creating your own upholster with the different textiles. While actually sitting in the chair you can interact with it by using the tubes or just throw them around you and fall asleep being embraced.”

RACHEL PERRY WELTY

雷切尔·佩里韦尔蒂
Lost In My Life

American artist Rachel Perry Welty makes use of the scads of everyday items we tend to throw away in her new ‘Lost in my Life’ series. She layers the often overlooked items to create a whole new textured landscape.

Lucas & Lucas

Trash Closet
An aesthetic attention grabber with the purpose of making people conscious that not everything they throw away is trash.

WANG ZHIYUAN

Ван Чжиюань
王智远
Thrown to the Wind

Feita pelo artista Wang Zhiyuan, essa torre de lixo de quase 11 metros de altura se chama Thrown to the Wind (jogado ao vento). O artista diz que queria retratar os montes de resíduos que se acumulam em sua cidade e chamar a atenção para o problema. “Eu quero que a minha arte seja algo maior do que eu. Se ela não estivesse envolvida em problemas da sociedade, eu me sentiria culpado”, afirma.

JONAS PFEIL

Throwable Panoramic Ball Camera

CEAL FLOYER

Throw

Mette Ingvartsen

The Artificial Nature Project
In The Artificial Nature Project a new encounter between human and non- human performers emerges from the following questions:What does it mean to make a choreography for materials where human movement is no longer in the center of attention?How can one address the force of things, materials, objects and matters as something that acts upon humans?What is the relationship between the animate and the inanimate world?
The outcome is a performance that literally throws things around. Materials fly through the air giving rise to a landscape that constantly transforms itself. Throughout the performance the view is persistently changing: a calm contemplative site may turn into an energetic chaos of stuff being projected into space. Or, a flood wave becomes a storm of confetti whirling through the air, rushing over the stage. The theater stage gets covered with and traversed by various objects and raw materials, creating a disastrous mess of small, thick, light, big, heavy, thin, breakable and resistant things.

ALEXANDRE BURTON

Impacts
Tesla coils each fitted with a glass pane and suspended from the ceiling of the exhibition space make up the components of this “live” sculptural installation. The presence of the visitor before each sculptural device activates an audio and visual experience. The visitor’s proximity to the works engages arcs of electricity of variable intensities as well as a rhythmic articulation, generated by the impact of the electrical arc on the glass pane.As a symbolic and sonic source, the Tesla coil’s ability to throw electric arcs has been employed by a wide spectrum of artists. With this new work, Alexandre Burton proposes the use of plasma (loosely defined as an electrically neutral medium of positive and negative particles) as matter and medium itself, circumscribed by a defined frame and articulated through unique programming. In this way, IMPACTS serves as a reminder of the danger and muscle of this marvel while capturing its sublime beauty and rhythmic potential.

URS FISCHER

Урс Фишер
nomadic art tent
The nomadic sculpture that Urs Fischer created for Station to Station is something of a steamy interior dreamscape, a glittery, shimmering vision that hypnotizes with lights and textures that both welcome and disorient. In the center of the piece is a plush Hasten’s bed on which viewers lie surrounded on all sides by mirrors and cloud-like smoke. A disco ball rotates above. Is this a place for disco naps? Or is it a glamorous fantasy of decadence and visual riches? Spend some time, look at yourself in the many reflective surfaces, and feel the bedding against your skin and decide for yourself. Dreamy as it is, this space is grounded in the real world and governed by the laws of physics. This place seems like a fantasy, but it is entirely real. As one critic noted of an earlier Fischer work:In a world increasingly defined by virtual realities and digital imaging, is the creative mastery of hand manufacture merely a quaint artistic throwback — nostalgia for a lost cultural past? Is this sculpture a memorial? Given today’s ubiquitous special effects wizardry, shouldn’t art clasp technology to its bosom? There’s nothing virtual about the softness of the bed, nothing digital about the gleam of those lights or the mist surrounding you. Take off your shoes. Climb inside. This is real life.

HELEN CHADWICK

海伦查德威克
ヘレン·チャドウィック
헬렌 채드윅
Хелен Чедвик
Piss Flowers
What will you do if it snows this winter? Throw snowballs? Get out the sledge? Or wee in the crisp cold whiteness as art? Helen Chadwick had an eye for the organic. She took closeup photographs of moist, freshly cut meat, superimposed images of her body cells over landscapes, and invented a unique winter methodology to create her Piss Flowers. Chadwick urinated in deep snow, then made casts of the interior spaces – instant caves – melted in the snow by the warm liquid. The resulting white forms of bronze and cellulose lacquer look like alien cities from a frozen planet, or fungal eruptions beneath the surface of the arctic ice. They are unique and haunting winter wonderlands.