ALEXANDER PONOMAREV

База

Объект «База» реализован во время работы художника по приглашению Министерства культуры Франции в ателье Кольдера в городе Саше. Девятиметровая горизонтальная труба, заполненная водой, образует тоннель для движения черной подводной лодки, которая, двигаясь по принципу троллейбуса, улавливается в крайних точках специальным устройством. Приподнимаясь над водой, на пропеллерах лодка поворачивается в обратную сторону и подобно хамелеону изменяет свою окраску, превращаясь в разноцветную и красивую. После погружения в воду лодка опять чернеет и стремительно продолжает движение

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Base

Object “Base” was realized during the artist’s work at the invitation of the Ministry of Culture of France in the atelier Colder in the city of Sachet. A nine-meter horizontal pipe, filled with water, forms a tunnel for the movement of a black submarine, which, moving according to the principle of a trolleybus, is caught at the extreme points by a special device. Rising above the water, on the propellers, the boat turns in the opposite direction and, like a chameleon, changes its color, turning into a multi-colored and beautiful one. After immersion in the water, the boat turns black again and continues to move rapidly

AES+F

The Feast of Trimalchio: Arrival of Golden Boat

Del Satyricon di Petronio, spiritoso e lirico malinconico dell’epoca dell’imperatore Nerone, ci pervenne quasi intatto solo il capitolo dedicato alla cena di Trimalcione. La fantasia di Petronio fece del nome di Trimalcione il simbolo della ricezza e del lusso, del vizio della gola e della lussuria in barba alla fugacità della vita umana.
Abbiamo cercato di presentare qualcosa di simile nelle realta` del Terzo Millennio. Così, abbiamo visto Trimalchione, ex servo, liberto, nuovo ricco che dà conviti di molti giorni nel suo palazzo, invece che una persona, come un’immagine generalizzata di un hotel di lusso, una sorta di paradiso terrestre, il soggiorno in cui è prepagato.
Gli ospiti dell’hotel – i ‘padroni’, esponenti del “miliardo dorato”, cercano di dedicare parte del loro tempo, in qualsiasi stagione, al soggiorno presso Trimalcione odierno che ha arredato il proprio palazzo – hotel con il massimo esoticismo e lusso. L’architettura del Palazzo Hotel rappresenta un’assurda sintesi della spiaggia tropicale con la stazione sciistica. I ‘padroni’ indossano abiti bianchi che sembrano, da una parte, l’uniforme dei giusti dell’Eden temporaneo, dall’altra, la tradizionale uniforme coloniale, e, al contempo, una collezione estiva alla moda. I ‘padroni’ impersonano tutte le caratteristiche dell’umanità: ci sono, tra di loro, personaggi dai bambini ai vecchioni, hanno certi segni psicologici e sociali: un pofessore è dissimile da un broker, una donna di mondo da una intellettuale. I ‘servi’ di Trimalcione, giovani e carini esponenti di vari continenti (asiatici, africani, latinoamericani), il personale dell’industria alberghiera, dalle cameriere ai cuochi, ai giardinieri, alle guardie e ai massaggiatori. Sono tutti giovani e belli e indossano uniformi tradizionali di vario colore a seconda dell’etnia. Sono una specie di ‘angeli’ “di colore” del paradiso al quale i ‘padroni’ possono accedere per un certo tempo.

 

Nina Katchadourian

Survive the Savage Sea

When I was seven years old, my mother read a book aloud to me titled Survive the Savage Sea (1973). It was the true story of the Robertsons, a family of farmers in England who sold all their possessions to buy a sailboat with the intent of sailing around the world for several years. In June 1972, the Robertsons lost their sailboat in a remote part of the Pacific Ocean when a pod of Orca smashed the hull, leaving the four adults and two children adrift for 38 days. After their inflatable life raft grew too leaky to be safe, they abandoned it for their nine-foot fiberglass dinghy, Ednamair, a vessel so small that with everyone aboard only six inches of the boat remained above the waterline. The family navigated to areas where they could collect rainwater and survived by finding ways to catch sea turtles, dorado, and flying fish until they were spotted and rescued by the crew of a Japanese fishing boat.

video

ROCIO VON JUNGENFELD

zones of flow (ii)
“zones of flow” is a work-in-progress project which investigates the fluid connections between people, sea and land. The piece zones of flow (ii) is an audiovisual artwork created to for the MAN display, which is located in a public area in NTU-Singapore; an open corridor where there is a regular flow of people moving across the space. The piece has come out of a sailing experience across the Atlantic in a 15m sailing boat. The ongoing project explores the instantaneous but sometimes asynchronous connectivity between things and people as they move in and across digito-tangible environments.

THOMAS HEATHERWICK

托马斯·赫斯维克
トーマス·ヘザーウィック
Томас Хезервик
boat

A new river boat designed for excursions on the Loire in France, capable of sailing in both shallow and deep waters, with maximum visibility for passengers, with the top of the boat a single continuous element from the hull – a closed loop.

David McCracken

데이비드 맥 크라켄
ديفيد مكراكين
דוד מק’ראקן
デビッド・マクラッケン
Дэвид Мак-Кракен

Walking to the Mainland
David McCracken began sculpting in his teens, mostly figurative work carved in wood. Returning to Auckland in his early twenties he worked in a variety of jobs including boat building and construction and gained skills using fibre and later steel fabrication and welding. He became involved in performing arts and in a short time was working full time in the production of sets and props.

Peter Flemming

Canoe
The work here in Dawson is like an old vehicle in which I’ve put a new engine. Entitled Canoe, it consists of an approximately 20 foot long trough of water, that resembles some kind of boat. This provides a means for a gunwales tracking mechanism to slowly, endlessly paddle its way back and forth. It was first constructed in 2001 in a studio beside Halifax harbour. It draws visual inspiration from the bridges and water vessels of this port. Conceptually, it grew from an interest in technological obsolescence: how things (like canoes) make shifts from utility to leisure.
It has experienced several major rebuilds since 2001. Most of them have been practical, but for Dawson I’ve opted for an experimental configuration that changes significantly the nature of the work. Previously, Canoe has only ever been shown indoors. Normally in runs on rechargeable batteries, with a continuous, smooth motion. In Dawson, it is shown outdoors, alongside the Yukon river, showing up in an absurd way the paleness of its artificial river. Here, the primary source of power is sunlight.
Making use of the long northern day, solar panels receive light, storing energy in an array of super-capacitor cells. At this time, Canoe remains still. A custom circuit monitors the amount of charge, and when a predetermined trigger point is reached, it is dumped into Canoe’s electric motor in a burst, allowing it to make a few strokes. Then Canoe rests, while the charging cycle begins again. Motion is intermittent, entirely dependent on the amount and intensity of sunlight. It ranges from near standstill in overcast conditions to perhaps 1 or 2 strokes every minute in full light. The technical term for this type of circuit is a relaxation oscillator. I like this term because, if you remove it from its technical context, it points back to ideas about leisure and utility.

R. BROOKE PRIDDY

boat dress

Ms. R. Brooke Priddy is a dressmaker and designer (and fabulous illustrator) also out of Asheville. Her little Ship to Shore studio in the West side of town is so magical. She creates custom dresses and wedding gowns with each client and each of her pieces is like a work of art in itself.

Chosil Kil

Speedboat

MYEONGBEOM KIM

МИЕОНГБЕОМ КИМ
김명범
tree boat

“I try to examine how my surroundings are perceived and remembered. To do this, I listen to a whisper from the objects within my surroundings. I attempt to have an intimate, private dialogue with the world, trying to concretely present the way things approach me, by using other mediums. To ask what an objects means to me is like asking what being I am. I have consistently experienced my surrounding objects from the perspective of life, growth, and decline, which lends vitality to my work.”

EDUARDO SRUR

אדוארדו סרור
Boat
Festival Serrinha

Eduardo Srur, from São Paulo, started painting, but stood out in urban interventions. His works use the public space to draw attention to environmental issues and daily life in the metropolises, always with the objective of expanding the presence of art in society and bringing it closer to people’s lives. The city is your research laboratory for the practice of artistic experiences; the public and governments are his target. Srur’s set of works serves as a guide for poorly managed spaces and urban errors. Above all, they are conceptual criticisms that awaken awareness and look at a new aesthetic and understanding of the visual arts.

ZHU JINSHI

朱金石
boat

Tra le opere presentate, Boat di Zhu Jinshi è un’installazione monumentale di 12 metri realizzata utilizzando bambù, cotone e 8.000 fogli di carta di riso legati tra loro. Si tratta di un lavoro che cerca di riconciliare due tradizioni diverse, mostrando come l’arte astratta cinese sia stata una forza inesplorata nel panorama contemporaneo.