Tim Knowles

Tree Drawings
Tim Knowles est un artiste pluridisciplinaire britannique. Même s’il se défend d’être obsédé par le vent, cet élément a beaucoup inspiré son travail, il aime ses propriétés et son absence de contrôle. Tree Drawing est un très bel exemple du travail de Tim Knowles, il accroche des feutres aux branches d’un arbre et attend que le dessin se fasse sous l’impulsion du vent ou de la brise sur les branches. Ce qui est beau dans cette oeuvre c’est qu’on peut ressentir les propriétés intrinsèques de l’arbre, qui peut être souple, rigide, léger, fragile.

Yunchul Kim

Argos
The work Argos is a 41-channel muon particle detector. It reacts with a flash each time a muon particle emitted by the universe is detected in the air – a mechanism that is carried over to another work titled Impulse. Taking the form of a chandelier, Impulse is a work consisting of numerous cylindrical tubes that extend out like the hanging branches of a tree as clear fluid flows through them. Every time Argos detects a particle, it transmits a signal to Impulse, with the result that we can see with our own eyes the air bubbles and motion of the fluid running through the artwork.

The Story of the Earth

The Story of the Earth

The Story of the Earth concerns the development of planet Earth from its formation to the present day. Nearly all branches of natural science have contributed to understanding of the main events of Earth’s past, characterized by constant geological change and biological evolution.

TOBIAS HUTZLER

BALANCE
Temporary sculptures, perpetual motion, focus, energy and balance. mandalas are deconstructed shortly after their completion. This is an allegory, done as a metaphor of the impermanence of life. An incredible kinetic sculpture is built of palm branches by the sculptor, it is amazingly held together only by a feather.

Pascale Marthine Tayou

Plastic tree
Tree branches of various distances and dimensions grow horizontally from the surface, inverting the usual experience and traditional relationship we have with trees. rather than leaves, the bark bears brightly colored plastic bags on its edges, crudely tied to each organic limb. While the work stands as a visual symbol of the harmful effects of pollution and consumerism on the environment, ‘plastic tree’ is also an investigation towards the artistic qualities of plastic as a medium, and its incorporation with natural materials.

Pawel Grunert

Chair 5
Born in Warsaw in 1965, Paweł Grunert is a designer, creator of artistic furniture and sculptor. The objects he creates fall somewhere between sculpture and applied art. He uses natural materials such as branches, straw, earth, grass, hay, reeds and wood, but he also employs bricks, fabrics and metals. He has designed and created around two hundred sculptures, spatial arrangements and pieces of furniture.

KADO BUNPEI

Tree of Chair
Through his sculptural practice, artist Pontus Willfors says that he seeks to examine “aspects of nature that are viewed by our society as product, nuisance or waste.” One of his frequently recurring motifs is the form of tree branches and root systems that sprout from from everyday objects as seen in this collection of furniture pieces that remind us explicitly of the material’s origins.

GIUSEPPE LICARI

朱塞佩 利卡里
The sky in a room

“Nature has always been a big passion and the relation of nature and man-made environments is something I often try to confront in my work. The Sky in a Room was first inspired by the forests’ fires that in 2007 destroyed a big part of the south of Europe. They were largely man-made fires, intending to generate new land available for building speculation. A sick tree was cut down by the municipality of Rotterdam, cut in smaller pieces, archived and re-built inside the exhibition space, against the architectural surfaces of the gallery. The trunk of the tree was removed in order to give the public a different physical relation to the tree itself and to the white sterilized space of the gallery. The dead tree presents its branches covered with a layer of moss and molds creating a suspended landscape.”

arata isozaki

أراتا إيسوزاكي
이소자키 아라타
矶崎新
АРАТА ИСОДЗАКИ
qatar convention center
Arata Isozaki’s initial concept was based on the holy Islamic Sidra Tree, which symbolizes the end of the seventh heaven. Huge steel columns create a tree-like appearance and an illusion of two trees supporting the roof canopy. The columns of the building grow from two concrete bases along the façade and divide into four branches. These have octagonal cubes as structural cores.

HE XIANGYU

Crossed Beliefs
He Xiangyu is a conceptualist with a clear vision of the world as a philosophical playground. The critical language employed in his artworks quotes from global consumerism, Americanism and militarism, emphasizing the power of infinitesimal change. He uses the shape of a leaf to describe creative process: Starting at the stem it branches out in many directions before returning to a thin tip in the end.

EIJA-LIISA AHTILA

Vaakasuora-Horizontal
The artwork shows a 11-metre tall spruce, with its branches swaying in the wind, filmed at full scale in six parts. The soundscape consists of the sound of the wind, the creaking of the trunk and birdsong. The method of display is, however, unexpected: it is shown in a horizontal position.Vaakasuora-Horizontal is a portrait of a spruce. It is an interpretation of the essence of the spruce, and the difficulty of observing and recording the life of a spruce. How can one capture the very being of a spruce? Each viewer will see the reality differently and each one of them will see the spruce trough glasses tinted by their personal memories and experiences. The artist has wanted to use this artwork to represent the German biologist Jakob von Uexküell’s idea of the parallel and concurrent existence of time and spatial worlds. The work of art, on the other hand, also moves the focus from the human being as the centre of the universe to the greatness of nature; people play a minor part in the greater picture.

NAJA & DEOSTOS

ECTOPLASMATIC HOUSING
File Festival
‘Ectoplasmatic Housing’ aims to speculate about how architecture can mediate the pervasiveness of the contemporary ‘infocalypse’ age. An architectural experiment of physical and digital space through the use of interactive design and augmented reality.

Browsing through a domestic safari of Trojan savannas or sterilised virus forests while contemplating the emergence of thousands of cheap-friends-facebook flowers blossoming among the pulsating cocoons of dying obsolete apps… Quantum reality theories are ripe for the picking from wiki branches of tweeting pink daily hit dwarfing trees…
Ectoplasmatic Housing aims to speculate about how architecture can mediate the pervasiveness of the contemporary ‘infocalypse’ age. It cultivates data for a spatial interactive second nature manifestation. It grows, blossoms, dies and haunts. Overlayed with the physical this unstable ectoplasmatic nature may shift radically into a rapid nuke ecology of nightmares.