Cassie Mcquater

Halo
In these six animated paintings presented as a single channel video, the artist reenacts situations and motifs from the first-person shooter series Halo and the erotic videogame Dream Stripper. Conceived as a dynamic, virtual collage, HALO shows short stock animation loops of characters dying over and over, with koi, dining chairs, asteroids, guns, flowers, torches, pinball machines, candles, and discarded pillows floating around them, creating a hypnotic motion.

YOICHI YAMAMOTO

Japanese firm yoichi yamamoto architects has completed ‘2D/3D chairs’ for tokyo fashion labels issey miyake store. featuring a series of traditional dining chairs, the installation transforms from a two dimensional graphic into a tangible piece. The perspective is manipulated creating a unique appearance from different vantage points for onlookers. graphics of legs in varying perspectives are printed onto a horizontal plane while the chair backs rest upon the surface. The seat backs maintain a seamless transition from the graphics by utilizing assorted sizes, heights and placed at diverse angles.

SNARKITECTURE

The Beach
The Beach is an interactive installation that reimagines the familiar natural and cultural elements of a day at the beach, to create an unexpected and memorable experience for people of all ages. Visitors ascend a ramp before entering an all-white enclosure, where the floor descends towards the highlight of the experience – an ocean of over one million recyclable, antimicrobial plastic balls. A pier extends out into the sea’, allowing people to stand in the center of the space and watch others, while an island invites exploration and discovery. Visual cues such as deck chairs, lifeguard chairs, umbrellas, and signage recall elements of the typical beach-going experience.

Shiro Takatani

ST/LL
ST/LL opens on a stage with a long set table, perpendicularly to the orchestra, under the eyes of the audience; on the sides of the table there are some chairs. On the background, coinciding with the inner extremity of the table, there is a projection screen developing vertically, like a painting that evokes the Japanese pictorial tradition. The perimeter of the stage is covered with a veil of water, in which everything reverberates. The whole visual structure of the work develops all around this diaphanous dimension. A man enters the scene and carries out actions on the table: he moves the cutlery, changes the position of the chairs, makes tiny gestures, which let the audience foretell that an action played on the visible will develop. To the sound of a metronome, two women and then a third one enter the scene and sit at the table making gestures that imitate a meal without food.

Jeremy Shaw

towards universal recognition

“Shaw  presents Towards Universal Pattern Recognition, a series of archival photographs framed under custom-machined prismatic acrylic. The works, which he calls optical sculptures, depict people in transcendent states accessed through prayer, dance, yoga and the like. They act as a preview to the videos, which are projected in meticulously constructed spaces, each with eight office chairs facing a single screen.” Diana Hiebert

Philippe Parreno

ФИЛИПП ПАРРЕНО
فيليب بارينو
菲利普·帕雷诺
H {N)Y P N(Y} OSIS
H {N)Y P N(Y} OSIS includes a vast collection of sculptural lighting that suspends from the cavernous ceiling. glowing white shapes informed by the design of movie marquees hang above visitors in bundles and as single geometries, casting dynamic patterns on the ground. as a participant walks through the site, they meet video installations, projections, pianos, chairs, speakers and sounds, all which have been carefully orchestrated to produce an immersive, sensory, and constantly-unfolding creative environment.

robert gober

Untitled Door and Door Frame
Robert Gober’s work focuses around the themes of sexuality, relationships, religion, politics and nature. Working mostly in sculpture, surprisingly Gober doesn’t use found objects as a part of his work, but recreates these found objects himself and handcrafts them in his studios. Objects such as sinks, doors, cribs, chairs and body parts feature heavily in his work but yet all meticulously handmade. All the objects and installations in which Gober creates have a certain humorous element to them be it the half body that sticks out from the wall or the sink that has legs coming out of it.

Fred Sandback

Untitled
Sandback did not try to ground his art in history or theory alone, but followed a very personal approach. Growing up, he had an uncanny fascination with things that were strung. According to his own accounts he liked to watch his uncle Fred, an antiques dealer, cane chairs, and he remembered being captivated as a child by a museum exhibition on how to make snowshoes. As a camp counselor in New Hampshire, he loved archery and began making his own bows. He also seems to have been interested in straight lines; as a freshman in college, he carved a tall, narrow cat out of wood, prefiguring a lifelong interest in linear forms.

Lara Bohinc

Orbit Chair in Black
In the collection, Lara Bohinc develops her stellar themes, finding inspiration in planetary and lunar orbits, whose gravitationally curved trajectories drive the lines and shapes of the chairs. Constructed from thin square rod, the chairs are elegant, minimal and delicate. They are finished in galvanised steel and wool fabrics by Kvadrat.

Stefan Wewerka

Class room chair
Polyfunctionality and deconstruction of everyday objects, irony and humour as weapons and moments of profound insight: these are some of the ideas behind the works by the architect, designer, sculptor and film-maker, Stefan Wewerka (born in 1928, in Magdeburg).
In his works, Wewerka pushes against conventional concepts relating to art and aesthetics, rationalism and functionalism. As a result for instance, the Last Supper is turned into a weird affair, the kitchen space turned into a kitchen tree. Wewerka’s unmistakable trademark is the manipulation of chairs. Sawn, hacked and bent out of shape, these chairs subversively thwart previously unquestioned concepts relating to furniture. In stark contrast to this, however, are his sculptural furniture designs, adapted to suit the requirements of the human body and its habits.

LUCAS SAMARAS

Лукас Самарас
卢卡斯·萨马拉斯
لوكاس ساماراس
ルーカスサマラス
루카스 사마라스
Chair

Since the 1960s, Lucas Samaras has devoted his art to the evocation of an intensely private, obsessional, sometimes hallucinatory realm. Among the many motifs that occur in his work, the chair is especially prominent. The “Chair Transformation” series has included provocative sculptures executed in a variety of materials including wood, wire mesh, and mirrored glass. Throughout the series, Samaras transforms the ordinary object into a fantastical one, evoking a dreamlike metamorphosis. Here the artist suggests an animated flight of stacked chairs. A deceptively simple form, the sculpture appears from different viewpoints to be upright, leaning back, or springing forward.

RALPH NAUTA AND LONNEKE GORDIJN

Studio Drift
Ghost Chair

The GHOST collection by Studio DRIFT is a futuristic concept of a chair, a 3D image captured within the boundaries of its outer shell. The chairs are handmade by specialists from Europe using the best materials. A unique 3D technique is used to form unusual subsurface drawings inside the solid Plexiglass chairs. The image of the inner ghost is created by a reflection of light on tiny air bubbles.

David Hupp

The Twins
The Twinns were an experiment to genetically manipulate a pair of identical chairs. They are what George Simmel would call “strangers”, carrying the dichotomy of both nearness and remoteness, objecting to precedent and abiding by they’re own laws.

KAREN RYAN

קארן ראיין
卡伦瑞安
카렌 라이언
カレン·ライアン
Карен Райан

“Necessity, fate, autobiography and subversion are the key influences upon my practice. I use materials that are provided as a product of continuous waste driven by mass consumption and fashion. There are enough mass produced chairs in this world: I collect discarded and unwanted ones from the street, car boot sales, jumble sales, second hand shops and charity shops[…]”

snarkitecture

the beach
the national building museum/washington D.C

The BEACH is contained within an enclosure and built out of construction materials such as scaffolding, wooden panels, and perforated mesh, all clad in stark white. Monochromatic beach chairs and umbrellas sprinkle the 50-foot wide “shoreline,” and the “ocean” culminates in a mirrored wall that creates a seemingly infinite reflected expanse.

TAKESHI MIYAKWA

holey chairs

SEBASTIAN BRAJKOVIC

Себастьян Брайковича
塞巴斯蒂安·布拉伊科维奇
Lathe Chairs

Nicola Kuperus

Attempting Camouflage
Two Chairs

Strijbos & Van Rijswijk

rocking chairs
Strijbos & Van Rijswijk invite you to sit back, relax and enjoy making music in a one-of-a-kind sonic rocking chair, where physical movement diffuses and modifies sound emanating from specially developed sensorpack and loudspeaker technology. Swaying back and forth produces an interactive, personalized performance where the compositions you hear are directly shaped by your individual movements and ability to coordinate and work in unison with your fellow rockers.

IBRIDE

The Hidden Chairs

Martino Gamper

View 100 Chairs in 100 Days

STUDIO NENDO

Mimicry Chairs

DORIS SALCEDO

دوريس سالسيدو
多丽丝·萨尔塞
도리스 살 세도
דוריס סלסדו
ドリスサルセド
1550 Chairs Stacked Between Two City Buildings

Bert Loeschner

БЕРТ ЛЁШНЕР
Twists and Turns Monobloc Garden Chairs

Alan and Michael Fleming

conjoined chairs

DARREN FOOTE

Dining Table with Four Chairs

DARREN FOOTE

Two Chairs

VALIE EXPORT

ואליי אקספורט
ヴァリエエクスポート
Вали Экспорт
Divided chairs

PHILIP LÜSCHEN

Waiting Room Survival

A ‘Sneak in front tool’, ‘Incognito nose stand’ and ‘Waiting Room Survival Book. Philip Lüschen has designed these objects as part of his project on waiting rooms, Waiting Room Survival. The Incognito nose stand seduces us to wait incognito in waiting rooms in places where we would prefer not to be recognized, such as a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases. And if you want to be seen by a doctor as fast as possible, Philip Lüschen has got the answer: The sneak in front tool, with which you can make everyone else in the room disappear behind the empty waiting room chairs.‘’Although the objects were designed as practical implements, when not in use they function as icebreakers. They stimulate the imagination and break through the tension and passive dynamic of waiting.‘’ The objects displayed are the result of the many studies drawn in waiting rooms, which also served as the basis for the ‘Waiting Room Survival Book’. A guide with useful illustrated strategies on how to survive a waiting room visit.
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DIET WIEGMAN

Dialogue between two chairs

SEBASTIAN BRAJKOVIC

Себастьян Брайковича
塞巴斯蒂安·布拉伊科维奇
Lathe chairs VIII

ANDY RALPH

Lawn Chairs

MICHEL DE BROIN

chairs satellite

ALESSANDRO MENDINI

proust chairs

STUDIO NENDO

Mimicry Chairs

JAIME PITARCH

15 chairs

MARINA FAUST

traveling chairs