KOHEI NAWA

Biomatrix
«Biomatrix» est une installation d’extrémités scycles de bulles de cellules éruptives émergeant à la surface de l’huile de silicone liquide. Cette circulation du liquide coloré évoque le comportement du magma ou du sang et, en raison de la viscosité élevée de l’huile de silicium, illustre le mouvement du matériau à une vitesse faussement plus lente que l’attente du spectateur. La piscine à commande électrique devient une interface qui amplifie l’impact visuel et produit à l’infini des motifs cellulaires. Une formation de grille ordonnée apparaît comme une matrice numérique, tandis qu’une observation plus approfondie révèle des irrégularités telles qu’une effervescence sporadique et simultanée et des sons plosifs brisant la tension superficielle.

James Bridle

The Right to Flight

A Londres, l’installation aérienne «The Right to Flight» de l’artiste britannique James Bridle explore la notion de surveillance depuis les airs et revient sur les utopies dévoyées des premiers aérostats.
Dans le ciel limpide de Londres flotte depuis le mois de juin un étrange ballon noir. Localisé dans le quartier populaire de Peckham, dans le sud de la ville, il est arrimé au niveau supérieur d’un parking désaffecté, vaisseau brutaliste dont les deux derniers étages hébergent depuis huit ans Bold Tendencies, un projet artistique estival, ainsi qu’un bar de plein air très couru avec une vue stupéfiante sur la skyline londonienne.Connu pour ses projets sur les drones ou son blog de recherche The New Aesthetic, James Bridle, né en 1980, a aussi posé sur le toit du parking une station de recherche expérimentale explorant l’histoire des aérostats, via des ateliers, des conférences et projections. Constituée de trois modules circulaires, fabriqués à partir de silos de grains lestés par des sacs de sable, l’architecture évoque tout à la fois les hangars des compagnies aériennes et la maison en kit Dymaxion de Buckminster Füller

 

Patricia Olynyk

Oculus
Oculus is a large-scale, collaborative light sculpture that depicts a colossal abstracted drosophila eye, replete with compound faceted surfaces. It both recalls the circular opening at the apex of a cupola and alludes to a surveillance device or drone hovering in mid-air. Oculus is inspired in part by a series of scanning electron micrographs produced in a transgenic lab while researching human and non-human sensoria. The work evokes affective encounters with scale such as viewing miniature particles through the lens of a microscope or wandering through monumental physical environments. As each viewer’s reflection plays across the sculpture’s undulating surface, the apprehension of the self affects both individual and collective behavior in unexpected ways. This affective dynamic plays on the precariousness of our coexistence with other lifeforms in the world, one that is always contingent upon viewers’ bodies and the variability of the environment around them. The act of gazing at Oculus also puts into play the reciprocal condition of both seeing and being seen.

REVITAL COHEN & TUUR VAN BALEN

The Immortal
A number of life-support machines are connected to each other, circulating liquids and air in attempt to mimic a biological structure.
The Immortal investigates human dependence on electronics, the desire to make machines replicate organisms and our perception of anatomy as reflected by biomedical engineering.
A web of tubes and electric cords are interwoven in closed circuits through a Heart-Lung Machine, Dialysis Machine, an Infant Incubator, a Mechanical Ventilator and an Intraoperative Cell Salvage Machine. The organ replacement machines operate in orchestrated loops, keeping each other alive through circulation of electrical impulses, oxygen and artificial blood.
Salted water acts as blood replacement: throughout the artificial circulatory system minerals are added and filtered out again, the blood gets oxygenated via contact with the oxygen cycle, and an ECG device monitors the system’s heartbeat. As the fluid pumps around the room in a meditative pulse, the sound of mechanical breath and slow humming of motors resonates in the body through a comforting yet disquieting soundscape.Life support machines are extraordinary devices; computers designed to activate our bodies when anatomy fails, hidden away in hospital wards. Although they are designed as the ultimate utilitarian appliances, they are extremely meaningful and carry a complex social, cultural and ethical subtext. While life prolonging technologies are invented as emergency measures to combat or delay death, my interest lies in considering these devices as a human enhancement strategy.This work is a continuation of my investigation of the patient as a cyborg, questioning the relationship between medicine and techno- fantasies about mechanical bodies, hyper abilities and posthumanism.

THOMAS HEATHERWICK

托马斯·赫斯维克
トーマス·ヘザーウィック
ТОМАС ХЕЗЕРВИК
Rolling Bridge
Le rolling bridge à la particularité de s’enrouler sur lui-même pour concilier à la fois la navigation fluviale du bassin Paddington et la sortie du magasin Marks & Spencer. L’objectif était de faire du mouvement, l’aspect extraordinaire du pont. Un pont roulant qui s’ouvre lentement et en douceur jusqu’à ce qu’il se transforme d’un pont droit classique, en une sculpture circulaire qui se trouve sur la rive du canal.

Yihan LI

The design of a global atmospheric research center employs the sphere for both its iconic and volumetric qualities. . .
A set of spheres are repeatedly scaled, each tangent to the last, and dissected by orthogonal cuts to create distinctive spaces with both soft and hard thresholds that suit the unique functions of each program. The complex contains: simulation laboratories; a research lab; control center; administrative offices; auditorium; and maintenance and public spaces. Users enjoy a binary experience when inhabiting the convex and concave surface of the spheres as they circulate between them in a spiral manner. The contrast between orthogonal and spherical, in addition to material and atmospheric transformations, reflects and celebrates the nature of the building as a research institute studying the air of the future.

julius von bismarck

Freedom Table & Democracy Chair
Suspended from the ceiling of the exhibition space, a blue office chair and a simple table each swing in a circular orbit. At times the movement of table and chair is closely aligned, at other times out of sync. Moving in a rhythm of dance-like accompaniment, the two objects seem to have attained weightless freedom.
The table and chair originate from the gallery. Computer-operated motors determine their precise circular paths, which have marginally deferred frequencies.

Andrea YOAS

Inter – Lock
These units were then arranged on the site and divided into housing spaces as well as circulation and public spaces on the ground floors. The way that the original spatial units interlocked creates outdoor spaces that wrap into the mass of the building, allowing for the circulation of light and air deep into interior spaces.

Jakob + MacFarlane

Orange Cube
Le projet du Cube Orange est conçu comme un « cube » orthogonal, dans lequel les architectes ont découpé un grand vide qui répond aux besoins de lumière, de circulation d’air et de vues. Ce vide perce le bâtiment horizontalement depuis les rives de la Saône vers le haut jusqu’à la terrasse sur le toit.

OTA+

Taipei Museum of Contemporary Art
This building proposal challenges the traditional definition of a museum and the conventional relationship between building and site. The ground floor of the building is reduced to a nominal footprint, enclosing only enough space for basic services, structure and ticketing functions. The ground plane is primarily reserved for exterior public space, including an art park, Hall of Fame, and garden walk. The bulk of the program and building mass are split by the open ground floor. Half of the building is coupled with the earth while the other half hovers in the air. The purpose is twofold; to minimize the damaging effects of extreme local weather by harnessing environmental flows toward productive outcomes and to re-conceptualize the identity of a modern art museum. The manicured roof plane of the below ground program is pocketed with water absorbing vegetation and catchment systems, while the hovering museum above expands to form open atriums, allowing diffuse light to brighten the space and passive airflow to comfortably condition the building.The program of the museum is interconnected. The Contemporary Museum of Art, Children’s Museum of Art and Administration are located within the floating mass. The lecture hall, parking, art resource center, library and classrooms are located below ground. The programs below ground are easily accessible and directly connected through vertical circulation tubes, providing both structural support for the floating mass above and space for movement systems, such as escalators, stairs and elevators between levels. All of the below ground programs are flooded with diffuse light passing through skylights that penetrate the landscape.

ANISH KAPOOR

阿尼什•卡普尔
アニッシュ·カプーア
Аниш Капур
Ascension

Anish Kapoor’s rise to San Giorgio Maggiore is an interesting mix of meteorology, theology and art. It was built for the 2011 Venice Biennale, inside San Giorgio Maggiore. The installation consisted of a huge exhaust duct at the top of the church’s dome and four fan benches that circulated the air around a smoke generator on the floor, directly below the dome. The installation reminds us of a tornado that rises to the sky, but not as a meteorological phenomenon, but as an aesthetic manifestation: a work of art

NICOLAS SCHÖFFER

ニコラ·シェフェール

Cet intérêt pour le dynamisme artistique a été initié par les cubo-futuristes puis intensifié et solidifié par les artistes constructivistes, tels que Naum Gabo, Anton Pevsner, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy et Ludwig Hirschfeld-Mack, soucieux d’ouvrir les trois statiques. -Forme sculpturale dimensionnelle à une quatrième dimension du temps et du mouvement. Et c’était aussi l’intention de Schöffer. En 1948, il a commencé à explorer la spatio-dynamique, plus tard en 1957 la luminodynamique (en intégrant la lumière, la musique, le film), et depuis 1959 l’élément du temps aboutissant aux travaux cinétiques (chronodynamique). Schöffer cependant, venant bien après, a bénéficié des théories cybernétiques (théories des systèmes de rétroaction principalement basées sur les idées de Norbert Wiener) en ce qu’elles lui suggéraient des processus artistiques en termes d’organisation du système qui le manifestait (par exemple, la causalité circulaire de boucles de rétroaction). Pour Schöffer, cela a permis à la cybernétique d’élucider des relations artistiques complexes à partir de l’œuvre elle-même.