Vvzela Kook

gods and Pilgrims

New media artist Vvzela Kook works in various audiovisual media,including performance, theatre, computer graphics and drawing to explore contemporary performing arts such as the possibility that dance and computer-generated arts could co-exist. Kook’s video works combine technology with her artistic practice to reproduce and convert urban cityscapes into an integrated virtual experience. The condensed textures in her works connect with multiple sensual levels in our perception and reintroduce the unexplored potential of video as a medium

Vincent Leroy

Illusion Lens
French Artist Vincent Leroy has proposed a geodesic installation imagined to sit atop the Roppongi Hills Mori Tower in Tokyo. The otherworldly sphere takes on a similar form to that of a spaceship, with three strong industrial legs holding up its perch. Sitting 238 meters high in the center of the rooftop’s helipad, the installation quietly overlooks Tokyo’s sprawling cityscape. Leroy accurately refers to the sphere’s kaleidoscope effect as “a sampler of the sky,” as it captures its surrounding climate and twists the image into multiple pieces. The artist designed the proposed installation as an escape from the busy streets of Tokyo, a place to contemplate and reflect in peace either alone or with loved ones.

Marnix de Nijs

Lost Dimension
Lost Dimension Non-dimensional Cities is an immersive cinematic experience in which participants journey through an endlessly unfolding virtual cityscape that expands over all axes. This dimensionless cityscape is constructed from a large collection of point clouds and sounds. While the user is standing on the controller pod and navigates through this virtual world, a sense of physical instability takes over and the platform becomes an anchor to hold on to. The building blocks of the world are generated from depth map information and panoramic photographs obtained from Google Street View’s API. Depending on the user’s position in the virtual world these blocks are dynamically repositioned on a three-dimensional grid. By subtle manipulation of motion and sound, perspective distortion and shifts in balance Lost Dimension unquestionably re-calibrates the viewer’s perception of dimensionality.

Richard Vijgen

WiFi Impressionist
Wifi Impressionist is a field installation that draws electromagnetic landscapes inspired by the cityscapes of William Turner. The work consists of a directional antenna on a pan-tilt mechanism that listens for WiFi signals and builds a three dimensional model of the signals around it. From this model a viewport is selected that defines the perspective and the frame. Signals that are picked up within the frame are visualised as waves emitted from a specific origin and drawn using a mobile plotter. The antenna and the plotter are both mounted on a tripod and can be placed in the field much like a painter would set up his easel. Once positioned and oriented a drawing becomes denser over time depending on the density of networks around it. Wherever there is a WiFi signal, the drawing will eventually fill the frame.

Michael Pinsky

Transparent Room
Transparent Room suspends viewers in a virtual space where they see through walls to hidden rooms and city streets, and through ceilings to the sky. The room’s confining walls are replaced by projections of the outside world, its time accelerated as clouds speed by and as cars and pedestrians alike race down the street. In this caricatured passing of time, views of the cityscape and of the building’s interiors are magnified, first showing details, then textures and, finally, just single colours.

wim wenders

two or three things i know about edward hopper
As part of their spring exhibition Edward Hopper, which focuses on the iconic representations of the infinite expanse of American landscapes and cityscapes of one of the 20th century’s most important American painters, the Fondation Beyeler in Basel will show Wim Wenders’ new 3D film installation.
Organized by the Fondation Beyeler in cooperation with the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the major repository of Hopper’s work.

Benjamin Sack

A paradoxical piece of the Astrum
Benjamin (Ben) Sack is an American artist, known for his pen and ink drawings of imaginary, complex cityscapes. He went to Virginia Commonwealth University and earned his BFA in 2011. Benjamin Sack lives and works in Leesburg, Virginia, a town just outside of Washington D.C. He graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University in 2011 with a degree in Fine Art.

Benjamin Sack

Impossible Cityscapes
Samsara

Often creating based on what he calls a “fear of blank spaces,” Sack tells Colossal that his starting point for each drawing is different. Finding inspiration in history, cartography, and his own travels, the artist starts with a general concept and builds his intricate worlds intuitively as he goes.

Benjamin Sack

Infinite Cityscapes
Sack’s work explores architecture as a flexible medium capable of expressing the unique space between realism and abstraction; where interpretation and our ability to create meaning is in flux. Within this space, Sack, furnished with pen and ink, encapsulates both the infinite and infinitesimal. His work invites the eye to explore drawings of the “big picture,” to gaze into a kaleidoscope of histories and to look further into the elemental world of lines and dots.

ATELIER OLSCHINSKY,PETER OLSCHINSKY AND VERENA WEISS

China in a Mirror
“Atelier Olschinsky, a creative studio in Vienna featuring the collaborative work of Peter Olschinsky and Verena Weiss, presents a unique look at the bustling urban streets of China in its series titled China in a Mirror. The collection of digitally manipulated photos showcase a symmetrical view of populated cityscapes. The illusion of perfect symmetry adds an uncommon yet interesting perspective of an urban environment crammed full of architecture and brimming with people.”

Iwasaki Takahiro

貴宏岩崎
Такахиро Ивасаки
تاكاهيرو إيواساكي

Takahiro Iwasaki is recognized as one of Japan’s new generation of emerging young artists, who creates intricately detailed models that reinterpret contemporary cityscapes and iconic historic buildings. In recent years, his artworks have been featured in numerous international art fairs and major exhibitions, with sculptures from his reflection model series receiving the greatest attention. The reflection model series focuses on seven of Japan’s most sacred buildings that all have an intimate visual relationship with the reflections they cast in the water that surrounds them

SS12 Studio Rashid

HyperveloCity

HyperveloCITY is a fast forward connected cultural organism that grows on top of the subway stations in downtown Los Angeles. The movement time line of the users (pedestrians, students, cars and train) is used as the operational strategies of the buildings framework. Velocities and rhythms are used to generate a new perception of space. The distance of the institutions would generate a wider field of influence in a dense cityscape. The main three volumes are an urban art museum, educational institution and a new convention centre, all separated one kilometer from each other. The various components of HyperveloCITY are connected by way of a the underground train system. The project is structured to emphasize the use and efficiencies of the public transport system and create not-so-often-seen public spaces and realms in densest part of downtown Los Angeles.

BENJAMIN YATES

electri-cities
A aerial view over a minature cityscape built from electronics. The City is built into a glass-topped coffee table – so the installation is not just an intricate artwork, it’s also a practical, interactive piece of furniture.