Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

Saturation Sampler
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s work Saturation Sampler, uses AI computer vision to track onlookers and extract the most saturated color palettes from their bodies and clothes, creating a gridded composition from the footage where viewers catch glimpses of their reflections in the pixelated field. With the widest color gamut available and an unparalleled 160-degree viewing angle, Luma Canvas delivers a unique viewing experience unlike any other. The direct emissive nature of the display’s LEDs creates a visceral and material encounter with Lozano-Hemmer’s interactive work, meaningfully situating his digital work within the physical realm.

Richard Quinn

Spring Summer 2019
Quinn’s clothes conjure a couture fantasy, with unabashedly extravagant shapes and lavish embellishments. This season the look veered between thigh-grazing confectionary frocks and a more dramatic voluminous silhouette that tumbled to the ground and swept the floor. The floral cocktail dresses of last season were even frothier this time around, bold in the shoulder and replete with handfuls of bows along the sleeves. If that sexy, legs-for-days line evoked frivolity, then the longer, grander gowns readdressed the balance.
FASHION LONDON

GUDA KOSTER

Wandering Mind
Guda Koster è un’artista e fotografo olandese che crea sculture viventi, installazioni montate su più paralleli che poi fotografa. Coi tessuti utilizzati in queste opere, l’artista vuole sottolineare i significati che i nostri abiti trasmettono. Andando oltre alla sua funzione, l’abito divulga un messaggio: “Nella nostra vita quotidiana, comunichiamo identità e posizione sociale principalmente attraverso i nostri vestiti. L’abbigliamento può essere visto come una forma di arte visiva che esprime il modo in cui vediamo noi stessi e il nostro rapporto con il mondo che ci circonda. “

Marshmallow Laser Feast

NEST

Inspired by Homer’s Odyssey
Loosely based on Homer’s The Odyssey, Marshmallow Laser Feast’s light installation lit the primary performance space within the chapel’s hazy internal dome. Grid-like projections crossed with mobile structures (designed by the architectural practice Studio Weave) as agile bodies crept over, in and through the many lit towers and surfaces. This first act was seen by the audience from the left and right balconies above. The second act, down flights of rope-lined staircases in the concrete basement, was more disorienting, lit only with triangular neon tubing and an eerie glow that seeped from an open door. The style of dance, in keeping with the more rapid and percussive score, by Canadian composer Christopher Mayo and electronic music composer / performer Anna Meredith, confronted the audience and was staged without boundaries dividing the dancers (some of whom were in street clothes) and viewers.

OLLY SHINDER

Olly has his whole life ahead of him, whether that means forging a career as an artist or designer or maybe even both. For now, though he’s focusing on fashion with a foundation course at CSM. “I love making things,” he says. “I think you can tell a lot of stories with clothes. Right now I wouldn’t say my style is quite there yet, as I’m only beginning, but I’ve been doing some quite experimental stuff, exploring unconventional shapes and fabrics. I like to toy with stereotypes.” He pauses. “I’m just doing what I want and what feels right to me.”

ELECTRONICOS FANTASTICOS!

Electro-Magnetic Band
Barcodress/Barcodance
ELECTRONICOS FANTASTICOS! project has been reincarnating various retired consumer electronics as musical instruments such as Electric Fan Harp, CRT-TV Drums, Air Conditioner Harp etc. The band plays them by catching electromagnetic waves. The Barcodress project aims to create the new kind of dance performance. The clothes which recorded sounds as striped patterns, and dancers, and the performers who scan the clothes, together make electric sound waves in real time. By expanding the principles of sound recording and playback to the body, we explore new possibilities for music and dance expression.

Rosie Danford Phillips

Opulent Virulence
“My collection is inspired by my fascination with nature; an interpretation of the complexity and unrestrained beauty of nature, which I express through complex layering, colour and a maximalist aesthetic that takes joy in abundance and opulence. I create my own ecosystems of layered and built fabrics in knit, print and unconventional embroidery. My clothes are in a state of rewilding – I infect the silhouettes with rich colourful textiles, giving them life. I grow my embroideries over graphic and sculptural silhouettes to emphasise and contrast the organic and the built landscape.” Rosie Danford Phillips

Rei Kawakubo

Spring/Summer 1997
Kawakubo never studied fashion. Instead she started out by getting a job in a textile factory, where she began styling. After struggling to find the clothes she wanted, she started designing her own, and eventually set up her company.

KUNIHIKO MORINAGA

“I think that there is both a science technology and a human technology in technology. I am interested in making clothes by crossing over these two different technologies. I think that in any age, it is important to maintain a close relationship with the technology of that specific age. Combining the technology made by man’s hands and the high technology made by the latest machines may be our future task.” Kunihiko Morinaga

sam o’brien

An interpretation of the textures of Iceland’s landscape, using synthetic and artificial materials to make the unnatural appear natural in the eyes of the ignorant. Paired with a silhouette inspired by the saturnian symbolism of the cube, these clothes journey from a literal, compromising analysis of the three dimensional cube to a broken down and wearable analysis of the two dimensional cube, the hexagon.

Omar Victor Diop

The Studio of Vanities

Oumy Ndour – Journalist, TV Anchor, Movie Director

The result is a collection of individual portraits, striking and captivating in their charm. Diop carefully chooses backgrounds and patterns to strengthen the subject’s personality and cultural references. Therefore, the colour of kenté fabric flawlessly matches the outfit of casually posing fashion designer, Selly Raby Kane. The clothes of artist Mame-Diarra Niang and model Aminata Faye fuse with an African background pattern. Using this particular approach, Diop becomes part of a tradition of African studio photography epitomized by the likes of Malick Sidibé and Seydou Keïta. He honours their pioneering work in his own creations, making use of contemporary techniques. Instead of merely creating striking images of an attractive young generation, Diop defines the images during the portraiture process, ensuring that decisions regarding pose, background and props are taken together with the subject. This makes it possible for Diop to come closer to the essence of the portrayed individual, and therefore do justice to the multiplicity and energy of Dakar’s contemporary cultural scene.

QIU HAO AND MATTHIEU BELIN

邱昊
When two talented people meet, an edgy fashion designer and an unconventional photographer, an astonishing project, intriguing in many levels, originates. The Serpens collection lookbook is the product of the collaboration between the Chinese fashion designer Qui Hao and the Shanghai based, French photographer Matthieu Belin. Named after the constellation of the northern hemisphere – the reptile, the mythological symbol that represents both good and evil – Serpens is as mysterious, futuristic and compelling as its name implies. An extravagant collection in which the size is the absolute dominant. Oversized clothes touched by the magic wand of minimalism.

RUUD VAN EMPEL

루드 반 엠펠
Рууд ван Эмпель

Van Empel’s working method is a complex one. He photographs 4 or 5 professional models in his studio, and takes many series of detailed photos of leaves, flowers, plants and animals. Having gathered hundreds of pictures in a database, he selects those images with which he can achieve the best results. The models are mixed in the Photoshop program, clothes are photographed separately on a tailor’s dummy. In this way he creates new images of mainly children, black or white, set in a paradisaical environment.

Rei Kawakubo

Comme des Garçons
fall 2017

“I’m not an artist, not a fashion designer, I just use fashion, use clothes as a material to make a business out of creation. This is a very important part. Don’t put me in a box.”

Bea Szenfeld

Paper Ensemble
Never coming up flat is the work of Bea Szenfeld, a Polish-born, Stockholm-based artist whose medium is paper. Szenfeld worked as a ceramicist and sculptor before pursuing a fashion degree at Beckmans College of Design in Stockholm. After graduating, she landed a job in the industry. Quickly realizing that working with commercial clothes was not her thing, she “jumped back to work with clothes in art.”

Kunihiko Morinaga

BONE
anrealage spring

I think that there is both a science technology and a human technology in technology. I am interested in making clothes by crossing over these two different technologies. I think that in any age, it is important to maintain a close relationship with the technology of that specific age. Combining the technology made by man’s hands and the high technology made by the latest machines may be our future task.”

SANTIAGO SIERRA

VETERANS OF THE WARS OF YOUGOSLAVIA, BOSNIA, KOSOVO, SERBIA & SOMALIA FACING THE CORNER
Santiago Sierra’s third solo exhibition at Team Gallery, Veterans, displays nine photographs of war veterans standing in corners. All that is visible are the backs of their bodies; their hands are clasped either behind or in front of them. Some are in uniform, and some are not. Some are accessorized, wearing for example, a watch or cowboy hat. One veteran in particular stands in plain clothes holding a cane, signifying a possible combat wound.

KAARINA KAIKKONEN

Каарины Кайкконен
Forget Me Not

Kaarina Kaikkonen (born 1952) is known for installations that are modest and monumental at the same time – the scale is lofty, but the materials down to earth. Most often she uses recycled materials, such as clothes or paper. The meaning of a piece can arise from the great number and anonymity of the clothes’ former owners, such as in her jacket installations, or from the personal memories and emotions of the people who have used the objects. On the other hand, the jackets, shirts and ties she uses are connected to Kaikkonen’s deceased father, yet their sheer number steers associations towards crowds.

Georgina Santiago and Guillermo Mora

ギジェルモ・モラ
VITRINE

VITRINE is a collaboration with artist Guillermo Mora, with who Georgina Santiago has a speciall creative connection. The idea behind it was to merge the two creative worlds in the way that the essence of a gallery is translated to the clothes and sorround them with a sculpure. The boundaries between art and fashion get blurry and the body become a sculpture itself. The surroundings of the body become part of it and all mutate into one. The body became a vitrine were the art is exposed.

Hot Dog Skiing

Freestyle skiing
The 1960’s will always be remembered for their counter-culture and rebellion against the status quo: long hair, loud music, and loud clothes! Skiing in the 1960’s was no exception. A whole group of young skiers began to do things on skis that hadn’t been seen before. It was called Hot Dog Skiing.

WILMA HURSKAINEN

Fog
Talk about blending into the background. Photographer Wilma Hurskainen and her sister wear clothes that perfectly match their natural surroundings. Whereas we’ve seen this style done before, never have we seen it done so naturally, almost as if it was all done by accident.They’re part of the larger series called No Name which deals with childhood and memory.“Invisible, was an idea that I once got while looking at snow and a forest line,” she tells us. “We have a lot of that in Finland! Even as a child I was very interested in the idea of hiding or mimicking an animal.” The woman in Invisible is actually one of her sisters.

BOHYUN YOON

БОХЬЮН ЮН
윤보현
Transparent Business Suit

“There is much to support the view that it is clothes that wear us and not we them; they mold our hearts, our brains, our tongues to their liking.” -Virginia Woolf. Uniforms group people in simplified versions of our social strata and take away our identity and individuality. In my transparent suit, I wanted to break the rigid impositions of the formal suit. Therefore, I juxtaposed the suit of a businessman and the naked body.

Sonja Baumel

crocheted membrane

‘Crocheted Membrane’ experiments with creating a momentary fiction through fashion artifacts. Starting with the physical needs of one individual human body in an outdoor temperature of 10 degrees Celsius, seven hand-crocheted body forms were produced. The clothing’s texture got thinner or opened up completely on areas of the body that needed less warmth and were thicker where warmth was lacking. In this way, a fundamental change in the aesthetic and function of clothes was displayed. Fixed forms, such as trousers, were recreated into new, unique body forms. Instead of one uniform surface, the textures became alive and inimitable. “Her concept of clothing does not derive in the same way as most fashion design, from shape or historically patterned form with embedded social hierarchy and material richness, but is instead determined by the needs and sensations of the human body – performing in the same way that bacteria populations individually respond.” (Villeré 2014) The resulting fictional artifacts illustrate how we could use knowledge about our unique bacteria population to create a novel layer.

Paula Perissinotto

As We May Feel
file festival

“As We May Feel” A parody of the 1945 text “As We May Think”, by Vannevar Bush What enduring benefits did science and technology bring to human beings? First of all, science and technology have extended the humans’ control on their material environment, helping them to perfect their food, their clothes, their dwelling, and gave them more security, allowing to live above the level of mere subsistence. Later on, they have permitted a wider knowledge of the biological processes that occur within our bodies, allowing the control of a more healthy and lasting life, always promising an enhancement of mental health. Finally, they contribute to the effectiveness of our communication. We have therefore a reason to live beyond survival — abundant health and efficient communication. And how do we deal with our existential feelings and conflicts? We don’t have time for our feelings, we can no longer ruminate them. We bury them in secret wishes without bigger consequences. Should we care more for our feelings? Negligence has been our way of cleaning our lives of sentimental values. When we cannot sweep them, we zip them and eventually access them to solve conflicts and/or to organize our thoughts. This project offers the access, through a click, to a central that points to a series of paths toward “As we may feel”. The content of this simulation of a phone center has as its aim to create an encyclopedia of existential feelings and conflicts that represent human life in contemporary society. Welcome to our call center!

LIAM YOUNG

Unknown Fields project
Liam Young is together with Kate Davies running the Unknown Fields project. They travel around the world and explore landscapes behind objects we used on a daily basis: materials for our phones, fabrics for clothes, lithium for batteries … We caught Liam in Ljubljana, where he was narrating Unknown Fields film live.

HECTOR SERRANO

Clothes Hanger Lamp

SUNG YEONJU

food clothes

MARCEL DUCHAMP

مارسيل دوشامب
马塞尔·杜尚
מרסל דושאן
マルセル·デュシャン
Марсель Дюшан
Étant donnés
Duchamp worked secretly on the piece from 1946 to 1966 in his Greenwich Village studio.[2] It is composed of an old wooden door, nails, bricks, brass, aluminium sheet, steel binder clips, velvet, leaves, twigs, a female form made of parchment, hair, glass, plastic clothespins, oil paint, linoleum, an assortment of lights, a landscape composed of hand-painted and photographed elements and an electric motor housed in a cookie tin which rotates a perforated disc. The Brazilian sculptor Maria Martins, Duchamp’s girlfriend from 1946 to 1951, served as the model for the female figure in the piece, and his second wife, Alexina (Teeny), served as the model for the figure’s arm. Duchamp prepared a “Manual of Instructions” in a 4-ring binder explaining and illustrating how to assemble and disassemble the piece.