TEAMLAB

L’univers Cristallin Infini
Le pointillisme utilise une accumulation de points de couleur distincts pour créer une image. Ici, les points lumineux sont utilisés pour créer des objets tridimensionnels. La sculpture lumineuse s’étend à l’infini dans toutes les directions. Les gens utilisent leurs smartphones pour sélectionner des éléments pour lancer l’univers de cristal infini. Ces éléments renaissent en trois dimensions, créant l’œuvre d’art. La présence de personnes et leur emplacement dans l’œuvre affectent ces éléments tridimensionnels, qui à leur tour influencent et sont influencés par d’autres éléments de l’espace. Cette œuvre d’art est en constante évolution, changeant d’instant en instant en raison  des personnes présentes dans l’espace.

NARINDA REEDERS

the shy picture
Narinda Reeders and David MacLeod
Here is a calm and intimate film in black and white, but which refuses to divulge the plot. The characters in the story are revealed to be in a painting. Although the subject is very classic since the portrayal of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde. Everything happens this time as if the problematic of creation ultimately had its own existence. This is often the case for the artist when faced with his production. Where in front of the finished work. Narinda Reeders and David MacLeod’s bring this little photo hanging on the gallery wall to life. It’s calm, discreet and mysterious. It is a duality that nevertheless works in both directions, that of the work vis-à-vis the artist, that of the art lover in front of a work. In both cases there is a personal touch that brings you to life. But the real does not come out unscathed.

Maxim Zhestkov

Supernova
Supernova is an experimental 4K art film directed and designed by Maxim Zhestkov and made in Zhestkov. Studio Everything around and inside us was conceived in a huge explosion of a star billions of years ago… and, probably, recycled from other matrices myriad times. In this eternal carousel of matter, particles gather, form complicated structures and then burst into all directions fusing atoms together and producing new elements and points of view, new colours and patterns of perception.

Teamlab

The Infinite Crystal Universe
Pointillism uses an accumulation of distinct dots of color to create a picture. Here, light points are used to create three-dimensional objects. The light sculpture extends infinitely in all directions. People use their smartphones to select elements to throw The Infinite Crystal Universe. These elements are reborn in three dimensions, creating the artwork. The presence of people and their location within the work affect these three-dimensional elements, which in turn influence and are influenced by other elements in the space. This artwork is forever evolving, changing from moment to moment due to the people in the space.

Fito Segrera

The form of becoming
In this abstract system, each intelligent agent is embodied as a motor, the states in its environment is represented as an angular range of rotation and the actions as one of two directions in which each agent can move a linear actuator. Each linear system holds a segment of a long black string, this translates as a point in the represented line. Once the system runs, each agent learns, from informational equivalents of pain and pleasure, to move towards the highest values within its environment, this means ultimately to displace its position from point A to B. In order for an agent to learn, it needs time, generations of exploration, each agent will get punished for bad decisions and rewarded for appropriate ones. Every time a learning generation is finished, a light will blink for that particular agent, indicating the end of a cycle and the achievement of new knowledge; the agent becomes more intelligent. Once all agents learned to be and stay in point B, the system, as a collective, has successfully mutated into a stable, balanced, symmetric and silent form; a straight line. Finally, after a few seconds, the sculpture forgets, all agents are rebooted and the cycle of creation, chaos and order restarts, this time with a totally different and unique behavior.

Oscar Sol

Trinity
Trinity is an audiovisual interactive dance piece which tells the journey of a body going through different states of perception of the space. Through movement, the body is immersed in an environment of textures and audiovisual landscapes that not only accompany but will push to a transformation process.This work proposes a profound, clear and efficient interaction between its three elements: the triad of movement, sound and visuals. This interaction is understood as a dialogue which passes through different levels of intensity and transformations throughout the piece and is focused in the detection of the following qualities and patterns of movement like: forces and directions, acceleration, position, speed and body area.

Ouchhh

SAY SUPERSTRINGS

Ouchhh will take inspiration from the notes that exist in the universe while micro-strings vibrate (Subatomic Particles) in real time and define the melodies created by the notes as “Matter” and symphonies of these melodies as “Universe”. With dastrio, Ouchhh will take 11 dimensions in abstract directions in super grade gravity theory and move them beyond space in real time. The dimensions captured intuitively in living space will constantly change and turn into reality.

dastrio:
Bernhard Metz – Violin
Manuel Von Der Nahmer – Violoncello
Suyang Kim – Piano

Ouchhh

H OM E OMOR PH ISM

Dome A/V Performance

A homeomorphism, also called a continuous transformation, is an equivalence relation and
one-to-one correspondence between points in two geometric figures or topological spaces
that is continuous in both directions.Many forms observed in nature can be related to geometry. In accordance with classical geometry,the shapes that found in nature are consisting of lines and planes, circles and spheres,
triangles and cones. These shapes actually are a powerful abstraction of reality, so we need primitive objects to give a form and understand the complex structure that exists in nature.

 

James Whitaker

Joshua Tree Residence

Whitaker has envisioned an “exoskeleton” made of shipping containers painted bright white. The containers appear like a starburst, with cuboid forms pushing out in all directions.The home is intended to offer a connection to the sun-baked landscape, while concurrently providing a sense of protection and privacy. Square windows frame views of the blue sky and rugged terrain. In some areas, faceted ceilings give the effect of being inside a crystalline form.

Samuel Mathieu

Guerre

A struggle that seems to be of particular relevance today. A metaphorical title, poetry of the line and of colour, that highlights the challenge that each of the parties represents. A kind of symbolic correspondence that flirts with our world, with our history, our human condition. War opens up perspectives of matter, a struggle both real and poetic that blends lines and directions, inscribing the trace, the hue, in the flesh of the dancing body but also in a seductive paradox between line and colour.

Balazs Kicsiny

Winterreise
Captured moments are central in Kicsiny’s installations. His characters are simultaneously frozen still and in motion. In some works this paradox becomes literal, as in the installation Winterreise that depicts two priests skiing in different directions using the same skis, which makes forward motion impossible. The figures seem lost, isolated and their journey endless. In their hands they hold Jacob’s staffs, navigational instruments used in the 17th century. The work alludes to the continuous search for one’s place in life.

Samara Golden

“The Flat Side of the Knife”combine des espaces physiques avec des espaces illusoires qui n’apparaissent que dans des miroirs, reflétant ce que l’artiste appelle des «couches de conscience», semblables aux espaces psychologiques et psychédéliques de l’esprit. Son utilisation de miroirs en conjonction avec des éléments sculpturaux fabriqués à partir d’un panneau isolant argenté, connu sous le nom de Rmax ou Thermax, permet à l’isolant d’espace de s’étendre dans de multiples directions; créer une profondeur imaginaire sous le sol de la galerie, par exemple, ou suggérer des pièces adjacentes qui n’existent pas réellement.

Strijbos & Van Rijswijk

whispers
Blue lightening discs seem to hang freely in a darkened space. They’re the horns of five more than man-sized ceramic trumpets, arranged in various directions. The white inside is radiated with blacklight, as it turns out when your eyes have adapted to the darkness. The horns transmit words, fragments of sentences, laughter, alternated with noise and a strange crackles and sputters. Each trumpet has it’s own repertory of expressions, of which the meaning is hard to probe. And each has it’s own characteristic sound, due to their difference in length.

MICHAEL CLARK COMPANY

マイケル·クラーク·カンパニー
Tate Project Part I ]

The choreography rehearsed and performed in 2010 paired the rigour of classical steps with contemporary movement, a juxtaposition that paralleled Clark’s training as a ballet dancer at the Royal Ballet, and his later anti-hierarchical, anti-authoritarian choreographic experiments. Balletic poses, jumps and steps were isolated from traditional narrative sequences and made strange through repetition. The graceful leaps and turns of the trained dancers seemed awkward and uneven, just as they were often out of sync and oriented in different directions. This choreography paralleled the performance space, which was demarcated by geometric and striped floor mats designed by Charles Atlas, which resembled the large windows at the back of the hall and the black beams that extend vertically from floor to ceiling.

CHIEH SHIH

Laser suit
taiwanese designer wei-chieh shih created this laser suit using 200 laser diodes attached to a special jacket he designed. the small laser diodes are attached to a nylon jacket that covers the wearer’s upper torso. the red lasers point out in all directions following the body’s curvature. the costume looks like a spiky design in daylight and transforms into a series are bright straight red laser beams when the lights are turned down. the final jacket design is the most finished piece, but wei-chieh shih also created a series of samples.

George Balanchine

The Nutcracker
Waltz of the Flowers
New York City Ballet

“You don’t think of choreographers as mathematicians — yet group dances involve arithmetic and geometry. Nobody mastered those aspects of the art more brilliantly than George Balanchine.
See what he does with the “Waltz of the Flowers” in “The Nutcracker,” as in this short detail:As it begins, 14 women, arrayed in four rows, face front. The two demi-soloists start: They dance from our right to left, with two turning jumps at the end of the phrase. Then a row of four women behind them take up the same phrase — but now the first two women repeat the phrase in the opposite direction, from left to right.It’s like seeing screens sliding in opposite directions. Then the next row takes it up; then the next; suspense and excitement build. It’s an accumulating canon — not spread out across the stage but at close quarters”. Alastair Macaulay

Santiago Ramón y Cajal

purkinje neuron from the human cerebellum
Ramón y Cajal’s theory described how information flowed through the brain. Neurons were individual units that talked to one another directionally, sending information from long appendages called axons to branchlike dendrites, over the gaps between them.
He couldn’t see these gaps in his microscope, but he called them synapses, and said that if we think, learn and form memories in the brain then that itty-bitty space was most likely the location where we do it. This challenged the belief at the time that information diffused in all directions over a meshwork of neurons.

NICK ERVINCK

Olnetop
OLNETOP has something monstrous, a hybrid shape in which one can recognize various elements. The work is not clearly defined but points in different directions. The imagery used is clearly inspired by macro photographic images of splashing water, and thus sculpturally interprets the encounter between nature and technology.

LAWRENCE MALSTAF

Compass
Compass is a kind of orientation machine to wear around your waist that gives you directions while you are walking through virtual corridors and rooms. These have been programmed to fit the physical exhibition space or any other venue. The machine creates a feeling of attraction or repulsion that can be compared to be being in a magnetic field. You can explore this environment and discover a tactile architecture. The machine is programmed to make you follow an invisible map, but you can choose between resisting to the machine or giving in and letting yourself be guided.

Mattia Paco Rizzi + Jessica Bergstein-Collay

Taumascopio
‘Taumascopio’ is an art installation designed and realized by parisian architect-artist mattia paco rizzi for the 2014 kanal playground festival in brussels, belgium. the structure is completely covered with mirrors and as a result, offers a complete visual camouflage along the molenbeek’s canal. as its exterior panels fold, the overall massing creates a kaleidoscopic effect that reacts to heat. during the temperature’s evolution throughout the day, the surfaces present an ever-changing reflective effect. ‘the ‘taumascopio’ invites us to reflect in poetic vein on public space, like a box of delights that gives us multiple visions and allows us to see the city differently,’ says rizzi. ‘the mosaic of reflections sends our thoughts in new directions and invite us to create new ideas.’

HE XIANGYU

Crossed Beliefs
He Xiangyu is a conceptualist with a clear vision of the world as a philosophical playground. The critical language employed in his artworks quotes from global consumerism, Americanism and militarism, emphasizing the power of infinitesimal change. He uses the shape of a leaf to describe creative process: Starting at the stem it branches out in many directions before returning to a thin tip in the end.

Matter Design

Megaphones
Each megaphone shapes sound in a unique way—variably in line or perpendicular to the performer, with narrow or wide washed bands of sound, some split into multiple directions, while others focus on a point. These family of megaphones are revealed through a series of tableaux. more

CERN

Globe of Science and Innovation
History of the universe
Did you know that the matter in your body is billions of years old?

According to most astrophysicists, all the matter found in the universe today — including the matter in people, plants, animals, the earth, stars, and galaxies — was created at the very first moment of time, thought to be about 13 billion years ago.
The universe began, scientists believe, with every speck of its energy jammed into a very tiny point. This extremely dense point exploded with unimaginable force, creating matter and propelling it outward to make the billions of galaxies of our vast universe. Astrophysicists dubbed this titanic explosion the Big Bang.
The Big Bang was like no explosion you might witness on earth today. For instance, a hydrogen bomb explosion, whose center registers approximately 100 million degrees Celsius, moves through the air at about 300 meters per second. In contrast, cosmologists believe the Big Bang flung energy in all directions at the speed of light (300,000,000 meters per second, a million times faster than the H-bomb) and estimate that the temperature of the entire universe was 1000 trillion degrees Celsius at just a tiny fraction of a second after the explosion. Even the cores of the hottest stars in today’s universe are much cooler than that.
There’s another important quality of the Big Bang that makes it unique. While an explosion of a man-made bomb expands through air, the Big Bang did not expand through anything. That’s because there was no space to expand through at the beginning of time. Rather, physicists believe the Big Bang created and stretched space itself, expanding the universe.

nonotak

SILHOUETTES
SILHOUETTES is a dialogue between space and light. Dots become lines, lines become curves. Directions and trajectories are drawn, space become oriented and is set in motion. Space is not vacuum, literally, but it becomes matter and it starts dancing in a field of shadow and light..

Zimoun

150 prepared dc-motors, 270kg wood, 210m string wire

The sounds of 150 mechanical seesaws striking the floor of a former church in Austria reverberate around its nave in this installation by Swiss artist Zimoun (+ movie).Named after the materials used in its creation, Zimoun’s latest installation is titled: 150 prepared dc-motors, 270kg wood, 210m string wire.The artist used the wood to build 150 simple seesaws, made from long batons that pivot vertically on short upright lengths.Orientated in different directions, these are scattered around the nave and transepts of Klangraum Krems – a Gothic church converted into an events space in the Austrian town of Krems an der Donau.Each seesaw incorporates a motor that powers a thin metal arm, which is attached to one end of the rocking wooden element by piece of wire.When the motor is activated the arm flicks back, pulling the string taught and causing the end of the wood to strike the ground.“Over a simple mechanical system the wooden laths are set in motion and randomly falling back to the floor,” said Zimoun.

MARNIX DE NIJS AND EDWIN VAN DER HEIDE

SPACIAL SOUNDS

Spatial Sounds (100dB at 100km/h) is an interactive installation that is capable of very intelligent behavior. Not only can the arm spin quickly or slowly, it can also make very well-defined movements in both directions. On the one hand, Spatial Sounds (100dB at 100km/h) lives a life of its own; on the other, it reacts very directly to the people in its space. The sensor can detect how close the visitors are and where they are in relation to the arm. When the installation scans the space, it makes inspecting movements and generates sounds that symbolize this scanning. It produces remarkably short, loud pulses and ‘listens’ to the reverberations from the empty space. The pulses combine different frequency ranges and rhythmical patterns. When visitors enter the room, they are detected immediately. The installation reacts in both a musical and a gestural way. The sounds relate directly to both the position of the arm and the dynamic ‘map’ of the space and the visitors. These sounds are very physical. For example, when the speaker is pointing at someone, it will generate a specific sound. This is also the case at high speeds and with several people in the room. However, the sounds and movements of the arm also tempt visitors to move around. Different locations in the space represent different sounds, as does the distance of the visitors to the rotating arm.

Kian-Peng Ong

Coronado
File festival
“Coronado” was inspired by a visit to the Coronado beach in California, which was an awe inspiring moment never experienced in other beaches. The soundscape present in Coronado seemed to be coming from all directions with layers and layers of sound waves. I decided then that I would make a sound work to translate this experience. The sound installation is characterized by the interplay of the analog and digital sound sources which layers over one another, exploring the idea of a seascape. The center of the installation is an ocean drum controlled with mechanical arms that creates and simulates the sound of sea waves. This is picked up by the microphone, reprocessed through the computer and sent out to the 6 channel surround speakers in different time. The interplay and sense of endlessness in the layering the analog and digital are my interpretation and response to the wonderment I found in Coronado.

ALEXANDRA DEMENTIEVA

Drama House
File Festival
“Drama house” is a house when the simple ring at the doorbell can have unpredictable consequences; event, one is stranger then another and in the same time all, what happens with habitants belongs to everyday life. Sometimes these circumstances are a little bit exaggerated. Spectator stands in front of low fence with a door-gate. There are 8 doorbells on it. The act of ringing provokes an action in an apartment window. Based on chance and the choices that viewers make, the project explores the contemporary trends in the construction of a narrative and the interplay between diverse informative sub-layers effected through the impact of digital, non-linear media. It also questions the very process of story telling and at the same time considers the way of audience reading. It investigates the differences of individual and collective perception. In other words, the sequence and choices that each viewer selects reflect his own perspectives and behavioral patterns, thus makes the viewer much more than an active participant. By interacting with the installation the viewer is engaged in the creative process: re-telling the ever-changing story through the utilization of the primary capability of the digitization: reshaping the information. Therefore, each participant walks away with a unique, slightly different vision, each shaped according to his own choices and directions. Interactive media and the digital environment of the DH and its narrative function through a recognizable metaphor that makes access to the information meaningful: a house as a conceptual society model and an apartment as a private space. This reference transforms the objects and stories in the project into the metaphors and reminds us of the art cultural function: as a site of memory of the social collective imagination and as a site of representation and power.