CONTRAPTION PAINTING MACHINE

françois xavier saint-georges
Assembled from chinese brushes and medical equipment, the low-tech automata creates ‘endless line’ ink paintings. Created by canadian designer François Xavier Saint Georges, ‘contraption’ is an autonomous painting machine, capable of creating a ‘never-ending line’ of paint. The low-tech device is composed of medical equipment like syringes and tubing, chinese brushes, and paper with an electric motor, that together continuously run a roll of paper along the wall, to be ‘painted’ upon by ink pumped into the set of brushes. Random variations in the ink’s consistency and viscosity at a given moment produce different effects on the paper, and different colours can be fed into the unit or layered on top of previous ‘paintings’. We will show you more projects from this guy, so if you like it you will see more about him. Enjoy it!

GENERAL MOTORS AND RALPH MOSHER

Walking Truck -Cybernetic Anthropomorphous Machine

In den 1960er Jahren bauten General Electric und Ralph Mosher einen 3000 Pfund schweren Vierbeiner namens “The Walking Truck”. Obwohl sich der Walking Truck nie durchgesetzt hat, können Sie sich immer noch fantastisches Filmmaterial dieses vierbeinigen Versorgungsfahrzeugs in Bewegung ansehen. Jahrzehnte bevor Roboter wie Big Dog und Quattroped auf die Bühne kamen, untersuchten Robotiker die praktischen Anwendungen von Lauffahrzeugen. Im Jahr 1962 stellte The Times Record fest, dass die US-Armee ein Roboter-Pack-Biest untersuchte: Der Mechanismus, für den der Boston Ordinance District einen Studienvertrag vergeben hat, würde als “Pedipulator” bezeichnet. Es wäre für unwegsames oder schlammiges Gelände ausgelegt und seine 12-Fuß-Beine würden mit einer Geschwindigkeit von 35 Meilen wandern. Der menschliche Bediener, der direkt mit dem Mechanismus verbunden wäre, würde in die große Maschine gehen und die 12-Fuß-Beine würden nehmen die gleichen Schritte. Die Arme der Maschine würden den Bewegungen der Arme des Bedieners folgen.

Move Lab

Who Wants To Be A Self Driving Car?

The moovel lab collaborated with MESO Digital Interiors to prototype this immersive experience. The idea was to make a machine that replaces the human senses with the sensors that a self-driving car might use. Our unconventional driving machine is essentially a steel-frame buggy with in-wheel, electric motors, complete with hydraulic breaking. Drivers lay head first on the vehicle; the positioning used to enhance the feeling of immersion (and vulnerability) created during the experience. A physical steering wheel controls the turning of the vehicle.The VR experience is created using data collected by the sensors outfitted on the driving machine.

REVITAL COHEN & TUUR VAN BALEN

The Immortal
A number of life-support machines are connected to each other, circulating liquids and air in attempt to mimic a biological structure.
The Immortal investigates human dependence on electronics, the desire to make machines replicate organisms and our perception of anatomy as reflected by biomedical engineering.
A web of tubes and electric cords are interwoven in closed circuits through a Heart-Lung Machine, Dialysis Machine, an Infant Incubator, a Mechanical Ventilator and an Intraoperative Cell Salvage Machine. The organ replacement machines operate in orchestrated loops, keeping each other alive through circulation of electrical impulses, oxygen and artificial blood.
Salted water acts as blood replacement: throughout the artificial circulatory system minerals are added and filtered out again, the blood gets oxygenated via contact with the oxygen cycle, and an ECG device monitors the system’s heartbeat. As the fluid pumps around the room in a meditative pulse, the sound of mechanical breath and slow humming of motors resonates in the body through a comforting yet disquieting soundscape.Life support machines are extraordinary devices; computers designed to activate our bodies when anatomy fails, hidden away in hospital wards. Although they are designed as the ultimate utilitarian appliances, they are extremely meaningful and carry a complex social, cultural and ethical subtext. While life prolonging technologies are invented as emergency measures to combat or delay death, my interest lies in considering these devices as a human enhancement strategy.This work is a continuation of my investigation of the patient as a cyborg, questioning the relationship between medicine and techno- fantasies about mechanical bodies, hyper abilities and posthumanism.

Bill Vorn

Prehysterical Machine

The Prehysterical Machine has a spherical body and eight arms made of aluminum tubing. It has a sensing system, a motor system and a control system that functions as an autonomous nervous system (entirely reactive). The machine is suspended from the ceiling and its arms are actuated by pneumatic valves and cylinders. Pyroelectric sensors allow the robot to detect the presence of viewers in the nearby environment. It reacts to the viewers according to the amount of stimuli it receives. The perceived emergent behaviors of this machine engender a multiplicity of interpretations based on single dynamic pattern of events.The aim of this project is to induce empathy of the viewer towards a “character” which is nothing more than an articulated metal structure. The strength of the simulacra is emphasized by perverting the perception of the creature, which is neither animal nor human, carried through the inevitable instinct of anthropomorphism and projection of our internal sensations, a reflex triggered by any phenomenon that challenges our senses.
FILE FESTIVAL

MARCEL DUCHAMP

مارسيل دوشامب
马塞尔·杜尚
מרסל דושאן
マルセル·デュシャン
Марсель Дюшан
Étant donnés
Duchamp worked secretly on the piece from 1946 to 1966 in his Greenwich Village studio.[2] It is composed of an old wooden door, nails, bricks, brass, aluminium sheet, steel binder clips, velvet, leaves, twigs, a female form made of parchment, hair, glass, plastic clothespins, oil paint, linoleum, an assortment of lights, a landscape composed of hand-painted and photographed elements and an electric motor housed in a cookie tin which rotates a perforated disc. The Brazilian sculptor Maria Martins, Duchamp’s girlfriend from 1946 to 1951, served as the model for the female figure in the piece, and his second wife, Alexina (Teeny), served as the model for the figure’s arm. Duchamp prepared a “Manual of Instructions” in a 4-ring binder explaining and illustrating how to assemble and disassemble the piece.