Achim Menges and Jan Knippers

Maison Fibre

Maison Fiber è un’idea inedita, esposta ed esplorata per immaginare un’alternativa ai metodi di progettazione e costruzione. Qual è il futuro dell’architettura? Come possono gli esseri umani adattarsi e vivere in habitat armoniosi? Una visione sostenibile è stata esposta alla 17. Mostra Internazionale di Architettura – La Biennale di Venezia 2021, un portale futuristico è stato esposto come approccio alternativo alla progettazione e costruzione di futuri spazi abitabili.
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University of Stuttgart, Institute for Computational Design and Construction (ICD) ve Institute of Building Structures and Structural Design (ITKE) tarafından Bienal’in bu seneki temasına yanıt niteliğinde tasarlanan proje, tamamen robotik olarak, lifli yapı elemanlarından üretilmiş bir yaşam birimi.
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Maison Fibre is a novel idea, exhibited and explored to envision an alternative to the methods of design and construction. What is the future of architecture? How can humans adapt and live in harmonious habitats? A sustainable vision was exhibited at the 17th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia 2021, a futuristic gateway was exposed as an alternative approach to the design and construction of future habitable spaces.

Robert Breer

Float
The Floats – or floating sculptures – that Robert Breer took up producing again at the end of the 1990s, emerged in 1965. The word “float” meaning something floating – a marker, fishing float or buoy – and which also describes those carnival vehicles whose pretend wheels give them the appearance of floating above the tarmac, enabled Robert Breer to apply this principle to works of a new genre. Primary shapes, neutral colours and, for the most recent, an industrial aspect, the Floats were then made with polystyrene, foam, painted plywood, and, more latterly, out of fibreglass. At first glance, these simple structures appear immobile. In fact, they are moving, imperceptibly, within the space they inhabit. Motorised and on mini-rollers – which raise them slightly above ground, giving them an air of weightlessness – they glide unbeknown to the visitor, following random paths that are interrupted by the slightest obstacle that they encounter.

ASTRID KROGH

Mare Tranquilitatis

Mare Tranquillitatis – the title of this optical fibre sculpture of cosmic dimensions refers to a lunar mare that is situated within the Tranquillitatis basin on the moon. Very slowly and barely perceptible, this work takes on varying hues of yellow and white, creating the strange and poetic impression that the work is actually breathing,imitating the sensation that the moon is actually alive in the night sky.

natalie walsh

Fiber Optic Dress

La créatrice Natalia Walsh, de San Francisco, a transformé les concepts de mode et a créé une robe innovante qui brille dans le noir.
Pour élaborer la pièce, l’artiste a réalisé un modèle basique blanc avec une jupe  ballon et un support pour les poignées des sources lumineuses. Ensuite, elle a inséré les fils de fibre optique autour du corps de la robe, les laissant vers le sol pour créer un effet dynamique.Pendant que le modèle bouge et marche, les fibres optiques changent de couleurs différentes.

Daniel Widrig and Guan Lee

Ecoire Chair

Daniel Widrig and Guan Lee at University College’s London Material Architecture Lab was made from coconut fibre and starch. Its twisting, symmetrical form gives the impression of coconuts being ensconced inside.

RUAIRI GLYNN

루아리 글린
Performative Ecologies
Each one of the four crude and very technically appearing devices is fitted with a punctually attached, luminous rod of fibreglass, which moves back and forth arrhythmically and freely. This installation’s poetry lies in the choreography of the little robots. They continuously try to gain the observers attention and impress him by waving their luminous tails. They recognise the reactions and movements of their human audience, learn from failure and share their experience with their robotic neighbours – a social structure of humans and machines.
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mylène boisvert

Mylène Boisvert was born in Drummondville, Quebec in 1971. She lives and works in Montreal where she completed training in Visual Arts at Concordia University and in Textile Design at the Centre design et impression textile (CDIT). She has several years of experience as a textile designer for the knitting industry and as a teacher at the CDIT. Her works were shown in several solo and group exhibitions in Quebec, Ontario, Buenos Aires, Paris and Tournai. A two-time bursary recipient from the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec, she was also awarded numerous prizes and she earned an honourable mention at Fibreworks 2014, a biennial Canadian fibre work juried exhibition.

David McCracken

데이비드 맥 크라켄
ديفيد مكراكين
דוד מק’ראקן
デビッド・マクラッケン
Дэвид Мак-Кракен

Walking to the Mainland
David McCracken began sculpting in his teens, mostly figurative work carved in wood. Returning to Auckland in his early twenties he worked in a variety of jobs including boat building and construction and gained skills using fibre and later steel fabrication and welding. He became involved in performing arts and in a short time was working full time in the production of sets and props.

Heather Phillipson

100% Other Fibres
Through collisions of image, noise, objects, language and bodies, Heather Phillipson’s videos and sculptural installations behave as places, musical scores, poems and nervous systems – attending to how physical and affective ‘selves’ are constructed, manipulated and, above all, escape. Often rendered as walk-in conglomerations of readily accessible materials (digital images, paint, cardboard, words, audio loops and reproducible consumer detritus), her works stake out an ambiguous territory in which cultural references and emotional responses are mutually contingent and reactive. Collapsing distinctions between the forthright and the inarticulable, the banal and the ecstatic, and between metaphor and extreme literalisation, Phillipson’s work performs constant tonal shifts, disruptions and bleeds. In so doing, it oscillates between physical intimacies and conceptual distances – desire, sensuality, touching and being touched, shame, anxiety, (over-)exposure, resistant surfaces.

Maria Yablonina

Mobile Fibre Robot

TAE GON KIM

تاي غون كيم
Robes de mémoire

Amant imaginaire
L’œuvre éthérée de Tae Gon Kim, Dresses of Memory, façonne des centaines de brins de fibre optique sous la forme de quatre robes magnifiques et extravagantes. Suspendues dans l’obscurité, les robes apparaissent comme des apparitions, scintillantes des royaumes de la fantaisie. Lentement, la fibre optique illuminée de chaque robe change de couleur, symbolisant son histoire et sa transformation au fil du temps.En créant l’œuvre, l’artiste s’est inspirée de l’écriture du théoricien et philosophe littéraire français Roland Barthes. Dans sa publication de 1978 A Lover’s Discourse: Fragments, Barthes écrivait: «Je veux être un, je veux que ce soit comme si nous étions unis, enfermés dans le même sac de peau, les vêtements étant l’enveloppe lisse du matériau fusionnant qui est en fait mon amant imaginaire.
Tae Gon Kim a interprété ce texte en créant des œuvres qui reflètent également sa propre fascination pour les relations et l’amour. Il veut que les robes amènent le spectateur à imaginer «que nous devenons les gens que nous aimons». En projetant des images sur les robes, il invite le spectateur à l’intérieur, «comme si nous portions nos désirs». Les différentes images racontent également l’histoire et en constante évolution de chaque robe.

JENNIFER RUBELL

جنيفر روبل
제니퍼 루벨
ジェニファールベル
Portrait of the Artist

Jennifer Rubell, the American artist and niece of Studio 54 co-founder Steve Rubell, brings a maternal touch to this year’s Frieze Art Fair with her autobiographical piece Portrait of the Artist. The pristine white nude, cast from steel-reinforced fibreglass, reclines like an odalisque at the Stephen Friedman Gallery stand. The sculpture is a replica of Rubell’s own eight-months-pregnant body, except it is eight metres high: the large belly, which is carved out to leave an egg-shaped void, can accommodate a fully grown adult. Spectators are able to clamber into the artwork and curl up inside as if they are the artist’s unborn child.Rubell’s intention was to create a monumental gesture of unconditional motherly love. There is a feminist statement here, too: Rubell has appropriated a style and scale historically reserved for male leaders to show, she says, “an emotion that is intensely personal and un-heroic”. The artist adds that watching members of the Frieze audience enter in the sculpture’s womb is “tremendously satisfying” – in her eyes the enlarged form was “incomplete until the first viewer entered”. Amid the hustle of Frieze’s mini-city there is something undeniably appealing about the opportunity to put your feet up in the foetal position in the name of art. Not to mention the comfort factor.

CARLO BERNARDINI

カルロ·ベルナル
卡罗贝尔纳迪尼
كارلوس برنارديني
Suspended Crystallizzation

Suspended Crystallizzation 2010, une grande intervention de la lumière dans l’espace extérieur, c’est un dessin spatial qui coupant le vide entre les bâtiments, s’impose au niveau de l’air comme une forme illusoire. Destiné à transformer l’espace du contenant de l’œuvre d’art en une forme ouverte et «perméable», le projet matérialisé par la lumière physique de la fibre optique est réalisé à travers le libre expressionnisme de l’espace dessinant les lignes de lumière en négatif dans une telle obscurité environnement comme sur une feuille sombre.