kenneth snelson

Needle Tower
“Inspired by architect Buckminster Fuller’s interest in the geometry of structure, Snelson’s experiments led to a prototype for a “floating compression structure.” Fuller subsequently credited Snelson with having invented a new structural principle which the architect named tensegrity, a contraction of the words tension and integrity.
These investigations into the physical properties of structure became more fully realized as an art form beginning in the 1950s. Snelson created sculptures consisting of tubes and cables. Cylinders of steel seemingly dance through space in defiance of gravity, yet it is the structural competition between tension and compression which underlies their construction. Snelson finds beauty in bringing these forces of nature into balance: the rigid compression tubes pushing outward, the flexible tension cables pulling inward. His sculptures would maintain their structural integrity beyond gravity, in the vacuum of outer space.” Joelle Burrows

Cod.Act

πTon/2
πTon/2 is a sound installation that intervenes in the continuity of the researches of Cod.Act on mechanical and sound organicity. It results from an experience on the deformation of an elastic form and its incidence on the evolution of a musical work. The object is a flexible ring closed on itself. It is set in motion by torsional engines located inside its body. πTon, by twisting and waving on itself, moves in a very natural and unpredictable way.

VEGA ZAISHI WANG

베가 왕
维加王
ВЕГА ВАН
ALPHA LYREA
Beijing-based fashion designer Vega Zaishi Wang’s new Alpha Lyrae collection is very special. Silk dresses of her design were printed with galaxies, constellations, and nebulas, then backed with lightweight and flexible electroluminescent paper, making the garments glow. The name of the collection is quite clever: not only does it reference the space theme of the design, but Alpha Lyrae is the name of the brightest star in the constellation of Vega, which is also the designer’s first name.

Zaha Hadid Architects

OPPO’s new headquarters
Four interconnected towers reaching a height of 200m (42 floors), the 185,000 square meters design incorporates two towers of flexible, open-plan spaces linked by a 20-storey vertical lobby, and two external service towers providing vertical circulation.

Sui Park

Her Contour
My work involves creating a 3-dimensional flexible organic form of a comfortable ambiance that is yet dynamic and possibly mystical or illusionary. It is an abstract representation of objects or concepts that recreates our surroundings. It can be interpreted in various ways including landscapes, living organisms, social ideas or values, anything that we accept as given that they exist. Through my work, I try to create an opportunity for audiences to see, think and most of all feel our surroundings from various perspectives.

JKMM

Amos Rex Museum
Amos Rex rethinks the urban park as part of our museum experience. Its structure is built with large concrete domes. This principle is very functional for museum use: it allows long column-free spans and flexible exhibition spaces. The domes contain skylights that introduce natural light into the galleries below as well as carefully selected views of life above. At street level, a new urban square has been created with a unique identity. The domes form an undulating landscape for people to enjoy, especially children. The Lasipalatsi building was restored respecting its valuable 1930´s Functionalist era interiors and details.

Oleg Soroko

Digital Substance

The parametric technology allows to generate a self-organizing system, that is, to open the essence of the universe as an infinite variety of possible self-organizing systems. The world is in constant process of self-development, but it is not chaos and not a set of known forms (cube, sphere, cylinder, from which you can build everything as Cezanne believed). Everything in the world (in the physical, biological and other reality) is in fluid, flexible, flowing, accelerating and decelerating movements that create tension, tears, force fields. And they are amazingly beautiful (attractors and fractals are their individual symptoms) and they exist before form and after form. It is not a solid, or lines in a space, but something that stands before and after the space.

EUNHEE JO

New Tangible Interfaces TTI

Interactive surfaces makes everyday objects multi-functional and fun. Reactive technologies have now enabled normal interfaces with new functions and new possibilities. The role of the surface is changing radically, according to how it’s designed and incorporated with objects. My proposal was to re-define the role of the surface in future lifestyle, exploring how surfaces can be an integrated as part of a product or environment.

TTI, (standing for Tangible Textural Interface) is a new sound system that embeds a tactile surface. TTI has flexibility that enables people to physically touch and feel the response through the controls and physical morph of the surface. TTI delivers new aesthetics through integrated flexible surfaces as interface material unlike adapting conventional materials for interfaces such as plastic or glass. Unlike existing 2D interfaces, TTI has a curved 3D surface opening up new possibilities in making flexible forms and shapes within the interface.

TTI consists of 3 main functions, backwards and forwards, volume control and equaliser, having a physical feedback and control interface within one surface. As you control the functions, the left surface physically responds to the controls. Tactile surface also responds to the beat of the music.

Ateliers Jean Nouvel

努维尔
جان نوفيل
ז’אן נובל
ジャン·ヌーヴェル
Жан Нувель
장 누벨
Serpentine Pavilion

The design contrasted lightweight materials with dramatic metal cantilevered structures, rendered in a vivid red that, in a play of opposites, contrasts with the green of its park setting. In London, the colour reflects the iconic British images of traditional telephone boxes, postboxes and London buses. The building consists of bold geometric forms, large retractable awnings and a sloped freestanding wall that stands 12m above the lawn.
Striking glass, polycarbonate and fabric structures create a versatile system of interior and exterior spaces, while the flexible auditorium accommodates the changing summer weather and Park Nights, the Serpentine’s acclaimed programme of public talks and events, which attracts up to 250,000 visitors each summer.
Nouvel’s Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, the architect’s first completed building in the UK, operates as a publicly accessible structure within Kensington Gardens and as a café. The pavilion design highlights the idea of play with its incorporation of traditional French outdoor table-tennis tables.
This 2010 Pavilion is the tenth commission in the gallery’s annual series, the world’s first and most ambitious architectural programme of its kind, which has become an international site for architectural experimentation and follows a long tradition of pavilions by some of the world’s greatest architects. The immediacy of the commission – a maximum of six months from invitation to completion – provides a unique model worldwide.