daniel gazana

atro enlevo

Entouré d’une atmosphère dense obtenue par la manipulation de voix de chansons anciennes et utilisant divers fragments de compositions industrielles, élaborés selon les paramètres réglables utilisés dans des logiciels spécifiques manipulés par un contrôleur MIDI, l’œuvre «Atro Enlevo» conduit l’auditeur dans l’obscurité et sortilège mystérieux.

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work atro enlevo

Ricardo Barreto and Paula Perissinotto

CYBERDANCE

This net art by Ricardo Barreto and Paula Perissinotto offers us a split, fragmented, impossible dance, in a divided, multiplied space. Cyberdance consists of the combination and recombination of elements that represent the different parts of the human body. A mannequin was photographed as a model in different positions. These images were later converted to the animated form, allowing users to combine them in different ways, as well as link them to different dance terms, to the names of postures and positions of classical ballet. On a page divided into frames containing fragments of the mannequin, we can see his head, legs, torso and arms rotating, while allowing us to subdivide each frame by clicking on it, each frame composing an aberrant doll whose fragments dance, silently, independent one from the other. There is no music, no rhythm, no space. It is a digital dance, a dance in which time and space have become a platform.

tabor robak

balenciaga collaboration
A 25 minute video loop with previously unreleased tracks by DJ Hell, made in collaboration with Balenciaga.

Here is a dramatic tension in his work between the real and the imagined in his use of often-appropriated digital objects to create virtual landscapes, which frequently contain elements – animals, machines, fragments of videogames – that are recognisable from our day to day life. This creates a symbiotic relationship between the digital and the real. In a very real way digital space has now become an intangible reality. The worlds built by Robak have a distinctly cinematic sensibility that hyperbolises the shine and dramatic effects of 3D rendered animation. The aesthetic of his work is supremely important, drawing the viewer into a truly alluring, indulgent and strangely gratifying environment. There is a further challenge to the void between high-art and the worlds of 3D animation and gaming, in the intersection between depiction and simulation. This can be partially attributed to the vernacular of advertising Robak is so proficient at utilising.

Vanessa Beecroft

瓦妮莎比克罗夫特
נסה יקרופט
ヴァネッサ·ビークロフト
바네사 비크로프트
ВАНЕССА БИКРОФТ
La Membre Fantôme

For the installation ‘le membre fantôme’, vanessa beecroft takes the visitor back to the classical language of sculpture through a conceptual perspective, leading us towards an intimate gallery room inhabited by timeless statuary. shown at the 2015 venice biennale, beecroft presents a scene that is visible only at a distance, where the viewer must look through a crevice carved out of two marble walls. Through the panels, we see fragments of a stone garden, rich in archaeological allures and echoes of early twentieth century avant-garde. the archive of memory is here a tribute in bronze – placed at the centre of the installation – to marcel duchamp’s ‘étant donnés’, a reference model for her research that combines personal memories, historical and artistic impressions and a conceptual tension.

Douglas Lee

Naiad
“Douglas Lee’s Naiad takes the audience on a fascinating journey to the depths of the ocean. Fragments of Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s poem The Kraken, a mysterious Naiad and a swarm of undulating dancers evoke the depths of an element which has long captivated the human imagination.” Stuttgart Ballet

Ingo Maurer

Porca Miseria!
“Porca miseria!” , created from the free and always different assembly of fragments of porcelain and crockery.

Anna Horcinova

INposition
In the photo project INposition (2013), which was shot by a Hasselblad 501CM camera, she’s using playful manipulation of physical fragments to express existentialism or the limits of body and mind. Anna Horcinova staged her models – mostly dancers in physically difficult dance poses expressing an emotional state of mind together with a gesture. And with the help of the body she tries to cross the imperceptible boundaries between her subject and the world around it.

Juliana Mori & Matteo Sisti Sette

timeLandscape woolrhythms

“timeLandscape – wool rhythms” 2010. Part of timeLandscape series, 2009 – 2010. Video, audio, projector, speakers, custom patch (PD-Gem), sensor, wool engine. Variable dimensions and duration, loop. “timeLandscape – woolrhythms” is an interactive audiovisual installation in which a landscape is depicted from its multiple time possibilities and [re]composed through users’ real time interaction. The installation was developed in Biella, Italy, an area economically attached to textile industry, and deals with the cyclical perception of time and human, linear, interference on it. It gathers nature and artefact, by connecting a physical wool engine to digital imagery of daily cycles. By turning the wheel crank, users generate movement starting the engine. Through a sensor attached to the machine, software calculates the rotation speed, altering parameters for mixing audio and video fragments in real time. Every turn of the machine leads to different time thread combinations in response to the rhythm and speed of each interactor.

FILE FESTIVAL

isabel berglund

Graduate of the Danish school of design and the Central Saint Martins College of Fashion and Textile in 2000, Isabel Berglund, having already exhibited around the world, is now one of the creative artists who makes use of knitting in contemporary art. Using knitted wool to create sculptures, she creates archaic memories with the mesh, sometimes incorporating clothing fragments so you can curl up in the sculptures and experience the inside. An experimental space where human and material boundaries merge in a knitted web of emotion, her work puts the poetic insight of a child at our fingertips.

JONATHAN SCHIPPER

Measuring Angst
Measuring Angst is a robotic sculptural installation by artist Jonathan Schipper that simulates the mundane act of throwing a glass bottle across a room into a brick wall. The event happens in slow motion, taking nearly 12 minutes to complete as the bottle rotates slowly through the gallery space and then gradually explodes into smaller fragments before rewinding and starting again.

RANDOM INTERNATIONAL

随机国际
towering shower

Random create artworks and installations that explore behaviour and interaction, often using light and movement. Founded in 2005 by Stuart Wood, Florian Ortkrass and Hannes Koch, the studio utilises raw fragments of artificial intelligence to encourage relationships between the converging worlds of animate and inanimate.

Wayne McGregor, Olafur Eliasson & Jamie xx

Tree of Codes
Tree of Codes opens with a magical world: a pitch-black stage with moving lights decked out on the costumes of unseen dancers. It could be a starry constellation or fragments of a city as seen from an aeroplane at night, or a group of robots powered by a playful AI operating system. more

Cerith Wyn Evans

СЕРИС ВИН ЭВАНС
ケリス·ウィン·エヴァンス
Form in Space…By Light

‘Cerith’s installation sits beautifully within the space, unfolding as you walk through,’ explains Clarrie Wallis, Tate’s Senior Curator of Contemporary British Art. The neon experience builds, from a single ‘peep hole’ ring in the South Duveens, through which you can glimpse swirls of radial light and an imposing octagon in the central gallery. The fractured neon fragments look like frantically drawn sparkler-lines on fireworks night.But there’s method and logic within these celestial scribbles. Hidden in the design are references to a host of highbrow sources, from Japanese ‘Noh’ theatre, to Marcel Duchamp’s The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23. Don’t worry if you missed them. The beauty of rendering precise (verging on obscure) references in such a celebratory neon explosion allows for multiple – if not endless – interpretations.Each way you look at the sprawling 2km of neon tubing, a different shape or symbol emerges. No small thanks to the elegant way in which the structures have been painstakingly suspended. ‘There were over 1000 fixing points, and obviously we couldn’t drill 1000 holes in the Grade II listed building,’ Wallis explains. ‘We had to work with structural engineers very intensely, so as to be completely happy and convinced that we would be able to remove it without damaging the fabric of the building.’Though it seems too soon to be discussing the installation’s removal, Wallis has a point. It’s a visibly fragile, delicate sculpture – whose impermanence makes it more intriguing. As it is a site-specific sculpture, it can’t be recreated elsewhere. What’s more, because the neon tubes are filled with a constantly moving stream of pulsing, vibrating gasses, visitors will never see the same sculpture twice.

The Chinese Room

Dan Pinchbeck, Robert Briscoe, Jessica Curry, Jacky Morgan, Nigel Carrington, Ben Andrews & Samuel Justice
Dear Esther

“A deserted island… a lost man… memories of a fatal crash… a book written by a dying explorer.”

“Dear Esther” is a ghost story, told using first-person gaming technologies. Rather than traditional game-play the focus here is on exploration, uncovering the mystery of the island, of who you are and why you are here. Fragments of story are randomly uncovered when exploring the various locations of the island, making each journey a unique experience.

file festival

Carla Gannis

Garden of Emoji Delights
FILE SAO PAULO 2015 

The Garden of Earthly Delights Triptych is one of the most famous works by the Dutch painter Hyeronimus Bosch. It dates back to the end of the fifteenth century and is kept in the Prado Museum in Madrid. The Triptych of the Garden of Emoji Delights is the version created by the contemporary artist Carla Gannis, in which space is invaded by small icons that today – thanks to the WhatsApp effect – are becoming an increasingly significant component of our language. It is not the first time that artists have played with emojis, perhaps inserting them in the real world or using them as neo-hieroglyphic fragments for cinematic riddles.

JIRO TAKAMATSU

高松次郎

Inspirée par des images d’ombres dans la peinture et les gravures sur bois japonaises du XIXe siècle, ainsi que par des ombres réelles projetées sur des portes coulissantes en papier dans des environnements domestiques, la série Shadow Painting de Takamatsu (1964–98) a étudié les fondements formels de la peinture à travers des représentations délicates de ombres (de clés ou de figures humaines) en émail et acrylique. La série rappelle également les empreintes figuratives laissées sur les murs laissés après la destruction nucléaire d’Hiroshima. Takamatsu s’est bridé à l’essentialisation du matériau et du médium au milieu du siècle, préférant plutôt un excès de l’ancien et, semblable à des artistes comme Eva Hesse, a créé des sculptures telles que Slack of Net (1968-1969) qui s’affaissaient et s’inclinaient sous l’effet de la gravité. Son Unicité du béton (1971) a pris la forme d’un gros bloc brisé en centaines de fragments, une ruine faite de monument qui contestait la suprématie du cube minimaliste.