New Media Tribe

Bloom
BLOOM is kinetic laser and sound installation by TRIBE investigating illusions of stillness unfolding at speeds unable to be registered by human sight. It is named for intangible flower-like shapes produced by moving lasers filling all the space and bringing new dimension to surroundings.

Stine Deja

Synthetic Seduction

Foreigner

Stine Deja and Marie Munk

The title of the exhibition was inspired by Sherry Turkle’s theory of how technology seduces us, making emotions “easy” by offering human relationships without the complexity of being together ‘face to face’. But if machines can become attentive and emotional, what is left to distinguish us as human beings? We are facing a paradigm shift in how we understand ourselves physiologically, as data and algorithms, and are being forced to question the role of our biological body. As the relationship between artificial and human intelligence becomes increasingly intermingled in our everyday lives, Synthetic Seduction provides immersive and timely insight into the limits of human empathy and intimacy. We are glad at SixtyEight Art Institute to host such a space for thought. We hope it will start conversations and maybe even encourage some intimacy among our visiting audiences in the coming weeks.

Jeanne Gang

American Museum of Natural History
Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation
“We uncovered a way to vastly improve visitor circulation and museum functionality, while tapping into the desire for exploration and discovery that is so emblematic of science and also such a big part of being human. Upon entering the space, natural daylight from above and sight lines to various activities inside invite movement through the Central Exhibition Hall on a journey toward deeper understanding. The architectural design grew out of the museum’s mission.” Jeanne Gang

EMILIJA ŠKARNULYTĖ

Mirror Matter
In the neutrino observatory rendered in Mirror Matter, slow panning movement gives a sense of the immensity of the nearly 13,000 photo-multipliers that inhabit this strange vessel – their ‘eyes’ engineered to watch light. Another frame depicts the Hadron Collider at CERN; its architecture envisioned through lidar scans, producing a dynamic, transparent imprint in three dimensions. Described as a vision that flows through the body, it is imagined by Škarnulytė as alien archaeological vision’ with the ability to see through, and as the experience of sight farthest from the human realm. Through simultaneous perspectives, the constant surveying motion that weaves a continues thread through each video narrative, and the immersion generated by the reflective black ceiling, the viewer is imparted with this panoptical mode of perception.

Ani Liu

Eyeris
Eyeris is a cultural prosthetic that renders the user dependent on human touch for sight. While many of today’s digital devices extend our abilities to connect with each other, disability of our current digital devices can been seen through our loss of tangible human interaction. I made this piece in trying to explore the importance of human interdependency in a society living under the myth of autonomy driven by technological symbiosis between man and computer. Eyeris is a mechanically operated electronic device powered by digital input that is deliberately over-engineered to call attention to the social behavioral conditioning imposed on us through less discreet technological devices that we assimilate on a daily basis.

LING LI TSENG

The Search of The Glow
Sprinkling the mist while attaching the tree trunk. Interweaving a scenery with the forest which is inside the deep mountain. Sight with clarity or blur. Light stream lead the mysterious mist to venture the forest. Found a light object under the crowd of trees which is constructed by blend woods. Wood sticks are overlapping and winding as a hollow pinecone. Its construction and pattern go well with the line of the treetop. It’s a whispering between human and the nature.

Greg Dunn and Brian Edward

Self-Reflected

Dr. Greg Dunn (artist and neuroscientist) and Dr. Brian Edwards (artist and applied physicist) created Self Reflected to elucidate the nature of human consciousness, bridging the connection between the mysterious three pound macroscopic brain and the microscopic behavior of neurons. Self Reflected offers an unprecedented insight of the brain into itself, revealing through a technique called reflective microetching the enormous scope of beautiful and delicately balanced neural choreographies designed to reflect what is occurring in our own minds as we observe this work of art. Self Reflected was created to remind us that the most marvelous machine in the known universe is at the core of our being and is the root of our shared humanity.

Gareth Pugh

加勒斯·普
غاريث بوغ
가레스 퓨
גארת פיו
ガレス・ピュー
spring 2018
‘This is not a show.’ Nick Knight and Gareth Pugh offer an exclusive visual insight into Pugh’s S/S 18 collection presented here as fashion film. In collaboration with philosophical artist Olivier de Sagazan, Pugh explores the extremities offered by the elements and the raw physicality of humanity.

isabel berglund

Graduate of the Danish school of design and the Central Saint Martins College of Fashion and Textile in 2000, Isabel Berglund, having already exhibited around the world, is now one of the creative artists who makes use of knitting in contemporary art. Using knitted wool to create sculptures, she creates archaic memories with the mesh, sometimes incorporating clothing fragments so you can curl up in the sculptures and experience the inside. An experimental space where human and material boundaries merge in a knitted web of emotion, her work puts the poetic insight of a child at our fingertips.

Stefan Wewerka

Class room chair
Polyfunctionality and deconstruction of everyday objects, irony and humour as weapons and moments of profound insight: these are some of the ideas behind the works by the architect, designer, sculptor and film-maker, Stefan Wewerka (born in 1928, in Magdeburg).
In his works, Wewerka pushes against conventional concepts relating to art and aesthetics, rationalism and functionalism. As a result for instance, the Last Supper is turned into a weird affair, the kitchen space turned into a kitchen tree. Wewerka’s unmistakable trademark is the manipulation of chairs. Sawn, hacked and bent out of shape, these chairs subversively thwart previously unquestioned concepts relating to furniture. In stark contrast to this, however, are his sculptural furniture designs, adapted to suit the requirements of the human body and its habits.

JILL SCOTT

Electric retina
The Electric Retina is a “neuromedia” sculpture which combines retinal research with interactive media art and metaphorical associations in order to explore the complexity of visual perception. Based on her residency in Neurobiology at the Institute of Zoology, University of Zurich, Scott gained a deeper insight into the genetic control of visual system development and function by analysis of zebra fish mutants, which are used as the main phenotypes for human eye disease research.