Moment Factory

Animistic Imagery
The exhibit introduces visitors to Duffy, the AI Artist, with an invitation to collaborate inside her Symbiotic Studio. This immersive space, made possible through projection mapping and interactive technology, invites guests to become the AI’s muse. As Duffy captures movements generated by visitors through real-time tracking, she draws links and connections, consulting a vast collection of colors and archetypal images of life on Earth. The result is an infinite series of surprising works of art—an artificial interpretation of humanity and the natural world.

Charlie Behrens

Algorithmic Architecture
This short film is intended to encourage a creative audience to seek out Kevin Slavin’s talk Those Algorithms Which Govern Our Lives. It employs an effect which takes place in Google Earth when its 3D street photography and 2D satellite imagery don’t register correctly. This glitch is applied as a metaphor for the way that our 21st century supercities are physically changing to suit the needs of computer algorithms rather than human employees.

KEITH ARMSTRONG

Shifting Intimacies
An interactive/media artwork for one person at a time. Each participant enters a large, dark space containing two circles of projected film imagery presented within an immersive sound environment. One image floats upon a disc of white sand and the other on a circle of white dust. Participants’ movements direct and affect the filmic image and spatialised audio experience. Throughout the work a layer of dust (an artificial life form) slowly eats away and infuses itself deep into the imagery and sound. Each person has 10 minutes alone with the work. Their movement through the space continually affects speed, quality, balance and flow within the work. At the end of the experience they are invited to climb a lit platform and cast dust back onto the images below.

PLAYDEAD

Limbo
Arnt Jensen
File Festival
FILE GAMES

Limbo is a 2D sidescroller, incorporating the physics system Box2D to govern environmental objects and the player character. The player guides an unnamed boy through dangerous environments and traps as he searches for his sister. The developer built the game’s puzzles expecting the player to fail before finding the correct solution. Playdead called the style of play “trial and death“, and used gruesome imagery for the boy’s deaths to steer the player from unworkable solutions.

 

Florence To

NOQTURNL V1
Noqturnl is an audiovisual meditation exploring collective dreamstate. The audience is invited to spend the night in the 4DSOUND system. A group of listeners are immersed in a spatial experience while they flit around the threshold between waking state and dream. Slow, pulse driven musical constructs, vast landscapes of sound and visual patterns develop over hours as the listeners drifts in and out of sleep, blurring the boundaries between dream environment and physical space: in doing so, allowing conscious access to the vivid, intuitive imagery and sensation within the borders of dream experience.

Steven Gawoski

Trench Denizens in Blue

The function of my art, visually, is to reconstitute subjects presented through scientific research, (via electron micrography, deep sea photography, or deep space imagery) into idealized forms. This method is perhaps more akin to an 18th century naturalist’s catalogue of documented specimens from far off lands, returning to be deciphered and judged under the reigning doctrines of the day.

KURT HENTSCHLAGER

Zee
File Festival 

Immersive Audiovisual Environment Artificial Fog, Stroboscopes, Pulse Lights and Surround Sound, 2008

ZEE proposes a state of tabula rasa and unfolds without a narrative or reproducible imagery.The audience wanders freely in a space filled with extremely dense fog that fully obscures all of its boundaries. Stroboscopic- and pulse lights illuminate the fog, in a softened and evenly dispersed manner, creating kaleidoscopic three-dimensional structures in constant animation. An ambient and minimal sound-scape connects to the imagery, without directly synchronizing to it.The core visual impression of ZEE is of a psychedelic architecture of pure light, an abstract luminescent landscape enveloping the visitor. Time appears to stand still.

RYOJI IKEDA

池田亮司
이케다 료지
Редзи Икеда
Transfinite
test pattern [n˚2] presents flickering black and white imagery that floats and convulses in darkness on two screens, one on the floor and another floor to ceiling, in time with a stark and powerful, highly synchronised soundtrack. Through a real–time computer programme, Ikeda’s audio signal patterns are converted into tightly synchronised barcode patterns on the screens. Viewers are literally immersed in the work, and the velocity of the moving images is ultra–fast, some hundreds of frames per second, providing a totally immersive and powerful experience. The work provides a performance test for the audio and visual devices, as well as a response test for the audience’s perceptions.

alex da corte

Bad Cat

“A giant cat made of foam and tangerine velvet with a wide, cartoonish, sharp-toothed grimace, almost fifteen feet high, is flipped on its back at the center of the gallery. It’s vulnerable—it looks like it’s yowling—and its shadow is a cut-out wraith of blue carpet.” Erin Schwartz.

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Da Corte often uses surreal imagery and everyday objects in his practice and explores ideas of consumerism, pop culture, mythology, and literature.

Kate Cooper

In ‘We Need Sanctuary’ (2016) and ‘Symptom Machine’ (2017), Cooper offers the body up as a contested space for communication and representation. Using computer-generated imagery, situations and characters are brought together to think through politics of exploitative labour, and the somatic experience of image production and distribution. Both works present, scenes of a Computer-generated bodies; both female and non-human who loom at the very edges of the screen. Their hands touch; they move backwards on a conveyor belt; and blood drips from the girl’s mouth while the non-human sweeps the floor behind her.

benjamin bergery and jim campbell

Jacob’dream: a luminous path
San Francisco-based electronic-media artist Jim Campbell creates work that combines film, light emitting diodes (LEDs) and sculptural elements. His choice of materials is often complex, and he uses them to create imagery that is allusive and open-ended. His exploration of the distinction between the analog world and its digital representation metaphorically parallels the difference between poetic understanding versus the mathematics of data.

olga de la iglesia

woman 27
Olga is part of a new generation of young women reshaping the art world from Barcelona. Using social media platforms to gain creative traction, and either blurring the lines between creative genres, she describes herself as an “imager”. Fashion with a documentary edge, strange still-lifes against brightly colored backgrounds, and monochromatic arrangements of ordinary objects. Teo Sandigliano

PAUL ROBERTSON

creation
FILE gif

FILE FESTIVAL SAO PAULO
Paul Robertson is an Australian animator and digital artist who is known for his pixel art used in short films and video games. He is mostly known for Scott Pilgrim Vs. the World: The Game and the recent release, Mercenary Kings. Apart from his seasoned career as a game designer and movie creator, Robertson has been recently spotted on Tumblr with these GIFS. His interest in inserting flashing neon colors, geometric shapes, Japanese character animation, and 1990′s computer imagery, deems his work as heavily influenced by the Seapunk/Vaporwave aesthetic.

Juliana Mori & Matteo Sisti Sette

timeLandscape woolrhythms

“timeLandscape – wool rhythms” 2010. Part of timeLandscape series, 2009 – 2010. Video, audio, projector, speakers, custom patch (PD-Gem), sensor, wool engine. Variable dimensions and duration, loop. “timeLandscape – woolrhythms” is an interactive audiovisual installation in which a landscape is depicted from its multiple time possibilities and [re]composed through users’ real time interaction. The installation was developed in Biella, Italy, an area economically attached to textile industry, and deals with the cyclical perception of time and human, linear, interference on it. It gathers nature and artefact, by connecting a physical wool engine to digital imagery of daily cycles. By turning the wheel crank, users generate movement starting the engine. Through a sensor attached to the machine, software calculates the rotation speed, altering parameters for mixing audio and video fragments in real time. Every turn of the machine leads to different time thread combinations in response to the rhythm and speed of each interactor.

FILE FESTIVAL

David Marinos

Skin 2
His work often uses classical imagery that is transformed and energised using decidedly non-classical colours and forms. He uses collage and glitch techniques on his own and found images to create a quickly expanding body of work which has a recognisable and consistent style but has un unexpected energy making it feel fresh and dynamic.

Jennifer Steinkamp

Jennifer Steinkamp uses computer animation to create video projections and immersive installations, dynamic works that explore the relationship between architectural space, motion, and perception. When projected, Steinkamp’s dimensionally modeled images create the illusion of receding space, generating a dialogue with the real space occupied by the viewer. Steinkamp’s imagery ranges from abstract undulating forms to subjects drawn from nature, such as the cascade of flowers in her 2008 series, “It’s a nice day for a white wedding.”

KOEN HAUSER

Amethyst
Amethyst initially was created as a site-specific installation with images and sound. Slowly dissolving slides reminisce the process of decay. The automated slideshow is projected in a dimly lit but richly decorated room, the visual style of the imagery referring to fashion photography. I created this work on the occasion of Salon/1, by whom I was invited to show my work in Museum van Loon during the Amsterdam Fashion Week 2010.

LINDER STERLING

לינדר סטרלינג
ЛИНДЕР СТЕРЛИНГОВ

The bodies, objects and surfaces were recognisably 21st century, but details and composition seemed oddly out of time, not least because the imagery was excised from print magazines and not from the internet, but also because the completed works so readily recalled Linder’s first photomontage experiments. Her pairings of different types of consumerist desire, which once declared themselves as critiques of misogynist objetification, are now equally a part of an abiding artistic practice. For example, looking at a particular conjunction of mock-ecstatic porn performers and ornate confectionery, we get the “message” but know too that we can only be in the obsessive, repetitive world of Linderland.

Heidi Kumao

Protest

“Protest” is from the project, “Misbehaving: Media Machines Act Out”(2002-2007), a series of mechanical girls’ legs, each with their own prescribed and programmed behavior. In each tableau, an electronically controlled, mechanical being protests with a voice of erratic physical gestures and projected video imagery. As a combination of robotics and performance, they represent girls who disobey or resist expectations. Unlike machines designed for perfect job performance, these machines will declare their fallibility, impatience, approval, and disapproval through small gestural acts. In these tableaus of protest and transformation, the machine is spirited, emotional, thoughtful, and irregular. “Protest” consists of aluminum, mechanized pairs of 6 year-old girl’s legs fitted with shoes and standing on a table top. An electronic circuit and proximity sensors make her responsive to the presence of viewers for whom she stomps loudly and erratically

JENNIFER STEINKAMP

Street Views

Jennifer Steinkamp uses computer animation to create video projections and immersive installations, dynamic works that explore the relationship between architectural space, motion, and perception. When projected, Steinkamp’s dimensionally modeled images create the illusion of receding space, generating a dialogue with the real space occupied by the viewer. Steinkamp’s imagery ranges from abstract undulating forms to subjects drawn from nature, such as the cascade of flowers in her 2008 series, “It’s a nice day for a white wedding.”