liu chang and miao jing

Hills beyond a river
Music: “CHINA-瓷” by Mickey Zhang
file festival
“Hibanana Studio is a creative art&tech studio, swinging at the intersection of audio-visual performance & installation, moving images and interactive installations. We are inventing new forms of the moving image for display surfaces of the future. A series of interdisciplinary research and practices range from video, sound, light, interaction and spatial experience leads us to artworks, commissions, and exhibition.”

BR41N.IO

Mindscapes
The BR41N.IO Hackathon brings together engineers, programmers, physicians, designers, artists or fashionistas, to collaborate intensively as an interdisciplinary team. They plan and produce their own fully functional EEG-based Brain-Computer Interface headpiece to control a drone, a Sphero or e-puck robot or an orthosis with motor imagery. Whenever they think of a right arm movement, their device performs a defined action. The artists among the hackers make artful paintings or post and tweet a status update. And hackers who are enthusiasts in tailoring or 3D printing give their BCI headpiece an artful and unique design. And finally, kids create their very own ideas of an interactive head accessory that is inspired by animals, mythical creatures or their fantasy.

HIROAKI UMEDA

holistic strata
Tokyo-based choreographer and video artist Hiroaki Umeda creates mesmerizing visual environments for his visceral solo works, appearing as a fine-spun swirl of movement in a digital storm of light and sound—an elusive figure, by turns frantic and still, awash in pulsating electronic waves. In a program of acclaimed companion pieces, Haptic and Holistic Strata, Umeda’s distinctive dance vocabulary draws on a range of butoh, ballet and hip-hop. He conceives his interdisciplinary events as a sensorial whole, creating the beats and sonic textures as well as the entrancing video and lighting effects. Designed to elicit primal emotion, Umeda’s work is minimalist and radical, subtle and violent, abstract yet precise, and thrillingly physical.

Lionel Hun and Pixel n’Pepper

Black and White
Dedicated to the design and distribution of live shows combining the arts in all its forms, Compagnie Hybride offers a fusion of aesthetics. It is positioned at the crossroads of creativity where the bodies and new technology meet. Land on which confronts, body language and visual arts, in order to promote a work interdisciplinary research, choreography and artistic innovation. Through its creations, productions, performances, films, exhibitions, installations, educational workshops and event services, Compagnie Hybride, carried primarily by a desire to exchange, sharing, research and development, has a mandate to create and disseminate its designs in the artistic and cultural networks nationally and internationally.

Agnes Meyer-Brandis

Cloud Core Scanner

Her current installation IN THE TROPOSPHERE LAB provides insights into the material produced under conditions distant from earth. The exhibition tells of the formation of clouds and shows conditions and combinations of art and science during zero gravity. With the exhibition by Agnes Meyer-Brandis, the project space of the Ernst Schering Foundation once again presents a contemporary art project that stimulates interdisciplinary debate and builds bridges to scientific research. The lab as a gravimetric document of the “Cloud Core Scanner” experiment shows a world alternating between controlled and bound-less states – artistic research in search of the reality level of constructions of the matter that surrounds us.

Alexis Walsh and Ross Leonardy

The Spire dress
Alexis Walsh is a designer and artist based in New York City. Through the exploration of emerging technologies including 3D printing and digital modeling, integrated with traditional handcraft, Alexis utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to push the boundaries of fashion design. Alexis graduated with honors from Parsons The New School for Design.

MIT Media Lab

Hybrid living materials (HLMs)
A method for printing 3D objects that can control living organisms in predictable ways has been developed by an interdisciplinary team of researchers at MIT and elsewhere. The technique may lead to 3D printing of biomedical tools, such as customized braces, that incorporate living cells to produce therapeutic compunds such as painkillers or topical treatments, the researchers say.