Christa Sommerer and Laurent Mignonneau

The Interactive Plant Growing
Interactive Plant Growing is an installation that deals with the principle of the growth of virtual plant organisms and their change and modification in real time in 3D virtual space. These modifications of pre-defined “artificially living plant organisms” are mainly based on the principle of development and evolution in time. The artificial growing of program-based plants expresses the desire to discover the principle of life as defined by the transformations and morphogenesis of certain organisms. Interactive Plant Growing connects the real-time growing of virtual plants in the 3D space of the computer to real living plants, which can be touched or approached by human viewers.

JOHN LIEBLER

Art of the Cell

Beneath our everyday world there is a miniature universe of cells, trillions of tiny worlds, unseen and beautiful. Here is our latest 3D medical demo reel, including clips from many of the projects we’ve worked on, such as “Biology:How Life Works”, and “The Inner Life of the Cell”. We hope that you enjoy this two and a half minute tour of the Art of the Cell.

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Art de la cellule

Sous notre monde quotidien, il y a un univers miniature de cellules, des trillions de mondes minuscules, invisibles et beaux. Voici notre dernière démo médicale en 3D, comprenant des extraits de nombreux projets sur lesquels nous avons travaillé, tels que «Biologie: comment fonctionne la vie» et «La vie intérieure de la cellule». Nous espérons que vous apprécierez cette visite de deux minutes et demie de l’Art de la cellule.

Nick Ervinck

Plant Mutation
The idea of mutation and manipulation has always appealed to Nick Ervinck’s imagination. In the ‘plant mutation’ series, he uses 3D experiments to explore ideas of both organic and genetically engineered life forms. Nick Ervinck created an openness that will attract the viewer to consider his work from different angles. These works have both a poetic and a critical social dimension. On the one hand, the sculptural contradictions, such as inside/outside and rough/smooth, make these works purely poetic. The visual language of these organic sculptures has a surprising impact.

Alexander Raskatov

A Dog’s Heart
Dutch National Opera
Libretto by Cesare Mazzonis
based on a novella by Mikhail Bulgakov

A Dog’s Heart is based on the book of the same name that the Russian writer Mikhail Bulgakov wrote in 1925 and which was banned for decades due to social criticism. It is a masterly “modern” parable in which Soviet society, which was still young at the time, is shrewdly filleted. A starving mutt is used by a doctor as a pilot project. He will have human testes and a pituitary gland implanted. Subsequently, however, the mutated animal develops into an unscrupulous human criminal. The only option is to surgically return the animal to a dog.

Euglena

Watage
An interactive installation using naturally-generated power rather than man-made sources like electricity. Dandelion fluff (watage in Japanese) soaked in water to form drop-like shapes, untreated fluff, and so on serve as modules, bonded with liquid paste to be reconstructed. The fluff sways in response to viewers’ breath or movement, even in the absence of breeze, immaculately revalidating the viewer’s own existence by making their influence on surroundings visible without use of technology. Using its surrounding environment to send off its seeds, the dandelion has achieved a lightness and form in its fluff specialized to the purpose and sprouts up each year no matter how the world may change. Having been drawn into the quietly-paced world of plants, the artist looked to dandelion fluff for a new form of expression able to hold its own against showy, rapidly evolving technological expression.