gabriel pulecio

Saturn Submerged

Saturn Submerged is part of an ongoing series of infinite boxes that creates an expanded infinite space within itself. The sculpture is composed of multiple mirrored surfaces and LEDs, which are fused to create the illusion of infinite depth and imagery. Mirrors include convex domes and walls; LEDs are programmed to continuously change in randomized combinations of almost infinite colors and sequences based on several variables.

Samara Golden

“The Flat Side of the Knife”combine des espaces physiques avec des espaces illusoires qui n’apparaissent que dans des miroirs, reflétant ce que l’artiste appelle des «couches de conscience», semblables aux espaces psychologiques et psychédéliques de l’esprit. Son utilisation de miroirs en conjonction avec des éléments sculpturaux fabriqués à partir d’un panneau isolant argenté, connu sous le nom de Rmax ou Thermax, permet à l’isolant d’espace de s’étendre dans de multiples directions; créer une profondeur imaginaire sous le sol de la galerie, par exemple, ou suggérer des pièces adjacentes qui n’existent pas réellement.

Mattia Paco Rizzi + Jessica Bergstein-Collay

Taumascopio
‘Taumascopio’ is an art installation designed and realized by parisian architect-artist mattia paco rizzi for the 2014 kanal playground festival in brussels, belgium. the structure is completely covered with mirrors and as a result, offers a complete visual camouflage along the molenbeek’s canal. as its exterior panels fold, the overall massing creates a kaleidoscopic effect that reacts to heat. during the temperature’s evolution throughout the day, the surfaces present an ever-changing reflective effect. ‘the ‘taumascopio’ invites us to reflect in poetic vein on public space, like a box of delights that gives us multiple visions and allows us to see the city differently,’ says rizzi. ‘the mosaic of reflections sends our thoughts in new directions and invite us to create new ideas.’

MEREDITH MONK

מרדיית המונק
Мередит Монк
ميريديث مونك
16mm Earrings
Meredith Monk’s groundbreaking performance work, 16 Millimeter Earrings, was a seamless integration of live performance, objects, film, vocal and instrumental music, movement, text, recorded sound, and light. It marked several, notable “firsts” for Monk: thinking of sound as an overall environment, working with her voice and visual images as primary elements, creating a full sound score, and incorporating film into a live work. The piece was a breakthrough in her quest to discover a visual/sonic/poetic performance form that could weave together multiple modes of perception. Responding to the original performances in 1966, art critic John Perrault wrote in the Village Voice, “Images, movement, film, words and sounds in Miss Monk’s new work are so skillfully interwoven and inter-related that no description can substitute for the kind of magic that she has managed to produce. The whole stage is her canvas and she uses every bit of it. 16 Millimeter Earrings has to do with surfaces, all seen as if through glass or reflected in a mirror. The surface of the human body. The surface of the erotic and the emotional. The radical juxtaposition of apparently contradictory surfaces- film, flesh, colors, and sound- becomes a witty method of deliberation and deliverance, and of complete art.”
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