Ed Fornieles

Test Studies
In the 20th century, the film industry largely monopolized the representation of human feelings, whereas in the 21st century, the video game industry engages our emotions through participation. At least that is what Ed Fornieles is trying to demonstrate with his video installation Test Studies in which three-dimensional simulations of a role-playing game are juxtaposed with the emotional comments of those who experience it.
video

Rhona Byrne

Huddlewear
For this exhibition, Huddlewear becomes a tool for activating exchanges in relationships between individuals, groups and communities. The exhibition invites and encourages visitors to wear and inhabit Huddlewear and to explore the intimacy and complexities of connection in real time. The interconnected designs of the garments can be worn by pairs and groups and aim to explore the wearer’s sense of self and vulnerability during moments of interaction and gathering. By inviting participation and reflection the ‘Huddle tests’ exhibition will involve a series of events and activities as well as an open invite for ‘group work’ for the duration of the exhibition.

Tromarama

Madakaripura

Digital image projection, software, real-time internet-based data, and sound
Installation shot at St. Saviour Church, London
Tromarama is an art collective founded in 2006 by Febie Babyrose, Herbert Hans and Ruddy Hatumena. Engaging with the notion of hyperreality in the digital age, their projects explore the interrelationship between the virtual and the physical world. Their works often combine video, installations, computer programming and public participation depicting the influence of digital media on the society perception towards their surroundings. They live and work between Jakarta and Bandung.

Jonas Vorwerk and Yoren Schriever

Pixel
Les œuvres qu’il crée introduisent souvent des chevauchements surprenants et ludiques entre le physique et le numérique dans l’espace public, où ils sont confrontés à un large public. Ses œuvres ne sont pas destinées à être présentées dans l’espace traditionnel du cube blanc, mais plutôt dans des rues bondées, des festivals en plein air ou des paysages ouverts où elles deviennent un sujet à diverses influences, où elles peuvent non seulement être regardées mais aussi touchées et jouées. L’élément de participation est en fait souvent inhérent à la conception des installations de Vorwerk, qui sont complétées par l’engagement du public. Leur caractère organique leur permet de changer continuellement et d’être toujours influencés par le contexte dans lequel ils sont placés.

Dragan Ilic

A3 K3
A3 K3 is a unique interactive experience. Artworks are created by machine technology and audience participation. Dragan Ilić uses g.tec’s brain-computer interface (BCI) system where he controls a hi-tech robot with his brain. The artist and the audience draw and paint on a vertical and a horizontal canvas with the assistance of the robot. The robotic arm is fitted with DI drawing devices that clamp, hold and manipulate various artistic media. They can then create attractive, large-format artworks. Ilić thus provides a context in which people will be able to enhance and augment their abilities in making art.

Mariko Mori

ماریکو موری
森万里子
Мори, Марико
Infinite Energy

Redefining the architecture of the espace Louis Vuitton are eight monumental pieces by internationally-renowned japanese artist mariko mori. The exhibition ‘Infinite Review’ amasses sculptures and experiential installations in a series of works that metaphorically reflect the never ending circulation of life and death as well as fragments from the artist’s personal experiences. Towering above visitors and traversing the space between the floor and ceiling are a triptych of luminous spirals. The soaring ‘infinite energy’ series is a visualization of an invisible force, felt and seen through their unseen participation with gallery entrants.

DUTCH INVERTUALS

Row Colors: Invertuals 2
These oversized, misshapen, foamy straightjacket bundles were made by Eindhoven-based duo Raw Color for design collective Dutch Invertuals. In a sweet range of minty pastels they look like they should provide a comfy bed, but wrapped around a head they’re more likely to suffocate. Created a couple of years ago as press material for Dutch Invertual’s participation in home furnishings exhibition Salone Internazionale del Mobile, the series creatively illustrates the malleability of material by taking flat foam and creating strange, abstract human sculptures.

file 2019

electronic language international festival
Since year 2000, FILE is a non-profit cultural organization that has been promoting exhibitions, workshops and gatherings that seek to investigate the appropriations of the technologic media in artistic accomplishments. With annual exhibitions in Sao Paulo, in addition to participations in national and international events, FILE is the biggest electronic art event in Latin America.more

JULIANA CERQUEIRA

Digitalized Body
“Corpo Digitalizado” is a work that requires public participation and, therefore, addresses subjects related to contemporary understanding of the human body and its relation with the machine and how the body acts before it.
The artist proposes that the public stay inside a booth for a few seconds and donate a small part of their time and bodies to be digitized by a scanner.

OPEN CALL – FILE 2019

Since year 2000, FILE is a non-profit cultural organization that has been promoting exhibitions, workshops and gatherings that seek to investigate the appropriations of the technologic media in artistic accomplishments. With annual exhibitions in Sao Paulo, in addition to participations in national and international events, FILE is the biggest electronic art event in Latin America. CALL FOR ENTRIES

BERNIE LUBELL

Conservation of Intimacy

Made of pine, latex, music wire, copper, nylon line, paper, pens and video surveillance. It measured 20′ x 35′ x 26′ at Southern Exposdure.
A couple rocking on the bench sends air pulses to another room causing balls to move and pens to transcribe their motions onto paper. The paper is moved by a third person on a stationary bike. The couple on the bench can watch the balls on a video monitor before them where the balls appear to bounce into the air. The motion is delayed and languid as though under water. Action is best when the couple is moving slowly together.As visitors work together to animate the mechanisms, they create a theatre for themselves and each other. By encouraging participation, and touch the pieces coax visitors to engage their bodies as well as their minds. The way that pieces move and feel and sound as you rock them, pedal, crank and press against them applies the kinesthetic comprehension’s of childhood to the tasks of philosophy.Bernie Lubell’s interactive installations have evolved from his studies in both psychology and engineering. As participants play with his whimsical wood machines, they become actors in a theater of their own imagining.

Alois Kronschlaeger

Grid Structure

Influenced by constructivism and post-minimalism, Alois Kronschlaeger plays with colors and angles to produce a kinesic effect in the works that are part of the series “Polychromatic structures. These WORKS by Kronschlaeger require the active participation of the viewer, as that on one side is something that is transformed by just moving a few steps to the right or left.

Szilárd Cseke

Multiple Identities, Sustainable Development
The focus is on multiple identities. There are pale, milky plastic pipes attached to the ceiling of the concrete interior, inside which, moved by fans, roll white balls. One after the other. If the one arrives, a new one is sent to another tube.Such works breathe inner unity. This closeness is sometimes a closeness, if not encryption. Because the language of contemporary installation art is foreign and difficult to read. The viewer’s gaze likes to evaluate subjectively and is always shaped by environmental influences such as culture, trends, styles, beliefs, experiences and politics. This makes the interpretation uncertain, it becomes subjective, often tempting to misconduct. Because anyone who claims that the work of art is created in the eye of the beholder and means that everyone, regardless of where they come from and how educated, can make a valid statement about a work of art is wrong. What Marcel DuChamp meant is that it unfolds in the eye of the beholder. But this development should not mean that simply opening the eyes also brings with it knowledge and insight. These qualities are developed through active participation, through perception. This, in turn, is not only feasible through the visual stimulus in the eye. It is possible, however, if you know who the artist is, what he is doing, what he wishes to express and with which underlying design principles the view is guided in what way to what. Only then does the processing take place, a connection of the causal relationships, which ultimately leads to art in the eye of the beholder. To an inner feeling outside of the spontaneous feelings.

YOKO ISHII AND HIROSHI HOMURA

It´s fire, you can touch it

On the other hand, an example of a work representing a difference in which the viewer is faced with participation in the event, is an installation by Yoko Ishii and Hiroshi Homura It’s fire, you can’t touch it (2007). In this work which appoints the active environment, onto the hands reached out by the participants, miniature light signs are projected—a Japanese tanka poem is running through, glyphs change form, fuse together, move. Here we deal with a poetic spectacle in which the perspective of cognitive interactivity, set off in contact with poetry, is complemented by tactile sensations and poems themselves are as if extracted from the environment by interactive gestures of receivers-readers.

LUMEN

Homage to B. Franklin
File Festival
Homage to B. Franklin is an interactive sound installation. Like Franklin, we also got inspired by the glass harps, so popular in the eighteenth century and still enjoyed nowadays. With this reference in mind, we aim to realize a dialogue between the past and the approach to explore sonority from elements of everyday life -like simple crystal glasses filled with water- and the present, in which we use electronic synthesizers and tangible digital interfaces to generate music. In both cases, there is something magical about being able to generate music without necessarily being an instrumentalist, without making use of classical or conventional instruments. In both, the resulting sound is different from what these instruments can generate, but still music. Participation from the audience is essential for this work to make sense. This is not an artwork of mere contemplative character. We are interested in motivating the participation and the dialogue work-individual and between individuals, since this is a project in which one can interact in groups.

LISA HAMILTON

À l’aide d’outils et de matériaux simples que l’on trouve couramment dans l’atelier d’un peintre, l’artiste Lisa Hamilton construit des images, des sculptures et de courtes vidéos qui interrogent les limites de la perception, la transmission du sens et la relation entre le spectateur et l’objet visuel. Dans des enquêtes récentes, elle engage le langage formel de l’abstraction, la théorie des couleurs et la dynamique psychologique du voir pour examiner le point de rencontre de l’observation et de la participation. Ici, elle propose, est le site critique où la forme produit du contenu. Dans son travail, les expériences de perception, d’enquête intellectuelle, d’émotion et d’invention matérielle convergent pour générer du sens à travers l’expérience du regard. Dans sa recherche d’articulation des idées sous une forme concrète, Hamilton a revigoré et élargi le discours contemporain sur l’abstraction.

GILES ASKHAM

Aquaplayne
file festival

Aquaplayne lays out a new field of expression by extending the framework for immediate experience. The horizontal plane bypasses recognition and “sets up” an interactive surface, making a play of art by providing the viewer with instant access to the creative flow. In the movement from observation to participation we interface with an intelligent canvas through the automatic rendering of action into effect. The “body in motion” plays across a field of sensation, making the ripples of possibility appear as an ever-changing artwork. Unlike the action painter, whose technique is to offload creative energy in the painterly gesture, the activator retrieves what has already been deposited as data and brings it to the surface, aquaplaning on a stream of information. The virtual is restored to the actuality of expression, brought back to life in the flux between cause and effect, between code and composition. The calibrated experience of Aquaplayne is the art of permutation, the programmed initiative played and replayed as the artwork in formation.

JEFFREY SHAW & THEO BOSCHUIVER

jump cushion

Le coussin était l’une des nombreuses « structures événementielles » gonflables conçues comme des interventions sculpturales provocantes dans l’environnement urbain quotidien. Placé dans une rue d’Amsterdam, où il bloquait la circulation, ce gigantesque oreiller moelleux offrait à la fois un spectacle ludique et une incitation à la participation des spectateurs. Une telle œuvre d’art ne concerne pas tant la fabrication d’un objet que la mise en forme d’un événement et d’une « situation d’opportunité » publique.