Reynald Drouhin

GridFlow

«GridFlow» rassemble des images d’articles dont les flux RSS sont enregistrés sous forme de mosaïque. Ainsi, le projet montre une fraction de temps sans début ni fin comme un rhizome, et révèle l’esprit des temps («Zeitgeist») à travers l’accumulation ou la répétition d’éléments phares de ces jours sur le web.

web work

Kimchi and Chips

Difference and Repetition
The title references Deleuzes thesis ‘Difference and Repetition’ – his attempt to understand reality without referring to identities. The artists aim to ‘unidentify’ the audience – to criticize the bubbles of reality which technology has helped us to build around ourselves. By allowing ourselves to remove our identity occasionally, we can better understand the thoughts of those we disagree with and therefore better work together to build a combined reality. Difference (in both senses) is generated by the motion control system which continuously changes the pose of the mirrors relative to the viewer. This movement disrupts space itself, creating a transformation similar to that of a Lorentz transformation when one travels close to the speed of light. This causes space itself to compress, twist and break, giving the viewer a tool for observing the non-absolute nature of time.

Dorian Gaudin

The coffee cup spring
The monotone repetition of the movement created by the conveyor belt recalls the pace and the landscape of animation or video games. As an extension of the conveyor, several geometric and orthogonal motifs evoking a Tetris composition are slotted together and suggest the shapes of a table, a chair or stairs. The objects are exposed on thin metal structures with fringed ends, and seem to peel off from their construction, as if they were undressing and exchanging skins, depriving themselves of sculptural depth and allowing only the surface to emerge. The technique developed by the artist to produce the sculptures inverts the usual steps of printing: first the pattern is created, then the background to which the fiberglass support is apposed. The pieces are therefore ripped off their mold, revealing their final texture, and the motif on every sculpture seems to remain the same, yet is altered by the shape of the object itself. A series of wall works using this procedure extends from the installation into the gallery space.

Eelco Brand

AEA.movi
Imitation is a part of being human. Eelco Brand uses both paint and digital techniques to create images that reflect his conception of nature. In this sense his works are not so much the depiction of an actual place or event, but the way he imagined it and modelled it in the calculated space of digital art. Viewing his work can be both an alienating and deeply human experience. His subjects are modelled to the utmost detail to create a kind of hyperreal cosmos, a simulacrum of nature. Still, we experience these models of forests, cars and mountains as pure conveyers of meaning. These static images speak the language of scale, light, repetition, infinite detail and the deeper meaning of a simple gesture.

Roman Ermakov

Роман Ермаков
live sculpture

Our perception — the only true reality. Creation as a feeling that generates the image, expressed in the form. Beauty manifesto calling to go beyond that limit imagination. The aesthetics of art can not be reduced to a clear set of building blocks with which you can strengthen or weaken the perception of contrast. Beauty should not be subjected to analysis, that is communication and the call to participate in the transformation of the emotional to the visible.The process of creating — is the alignment of the mosaic, many repetitions of simple and pure elements, which form a collection, harmonious in its incompleteness.

Onformative

True/False
True/False is a kinetic sculpture composed of arrays of circular black metal segments set in mechanical columns. Interlocking and rotating around fluorescent light tubes, the cylinders cover or expose the light to display an endless number of patterns. The transformation of the sculpture is based on the shifting elements and their correlation to each other. As the segments do not move independently, for any of the cylinders on a column to change, the segments affected must work in unison to achieve the command. Reminiscent of devices originally used for calculations, such as Turing machines, the sound originates from the mechanical movement of the moving parts thus making the algorithm audible. The rhythm of »true/false« is captivating as variations in the visual choreography result in distinctive changes in its soundscape. Through the generation of algorithmic patterns and the repetition of endless tasks, »true/false« transforms itself into something more than the sum of its elements to reveal the beauty hidden within a basic algorithm.

Felipe Pantone

Chromadynamica
Pantone’s work deals with dynamism, transformation, digital revolution, and themes related to the present times. Felipe Pantone evokes a spirit in his work that feels like a collision between an analog past and a digitized future, where human beings and machines will inevitably glitch alongside one another in a prism of neon gradients, geometric shapes, optical patterns, and jagged grids. Based in Spain, Pantone is a byproduct of the technological age when kids unlocked life’s mysteries through the Internet. As a result of this prolonged screen time, he explores how the displacement of the light spectrum impacts color and repetition.

PETER KOGLER

彼得·科格勒
Liquid
Peter Kogler`s works belong to the developing “post medial paintings” (Peter Weibl) in the 80`s. Moulded by the new media, these took on the complex form of installations. One of the main questions was the mental relationship between virtual and real space, as well as the perceptive possibilities of connection. The work, which reminds you of chaotic structures and Baroque dimensions, is based on the circularly moment of repetition, that consciously corresponds to the position of kunst Meran (pedestrian zone).

TATSUO MIYAJIMA

宫岛达男
Connect with Everything

Since 1987, Tatsuo Miyajima has been constructing installations using LED digital counting devices. His works combine a performative aspect with architectonic structures, sometimes taking the shape of geometric patterns or organic shapes as well as encompassing vertical and horizontal surfaces. The LED devices count progressively from 1 to 9 or backwards – Miyajima never employs 0 – establishing a rhythm as definitive as repetition itself and the inexorable passing of time.

MICHAEL CLARK COMPANY

マイケル·クラーク·カンパニー
Tate Project Part I ]

The choreography rehearsed and performed in 2010 paired the rigour of classical steps with contemporary movement, a juxtaposition that paralleled Clark’s training as a ballet dancer at the Royal Ballet, and his later anti-hierarchical, anti-authoritarian choreographic experiments. Balletic poses, jumps and steps were isolated from traditional narrative sequences and made strange through repetition. The graceful leaps and turns of the trained dancers seemed awkward and uneven, just as they were often out of sync and oriented in different directions. This choreography paralleled the performance space, which was demarcated by geometric and striped floor mats designed by Charles Atlas, which resembled the large windows at the back of the hall and the black beams that extend vertically from floor to ceiling.

Thomas Bayrle

Telefon Portrait
Thomas Bayrle (*1937) has been invited to Museum Ludwig’s main gallery to install an overview of his works from the last 40 years that all explore a particular artistic strategy: the loop or looping. While a loop is a kind of ring, the activity of looping refers to the continual repetition of the one and the same motif, whether in Rap music or by constantly running through the same sequence when writing a computer programme. Just such a game between difference and repetition has developed in Thomas Bayrle’s graphic oeuvre

KATHARINA FRITSCH

КАТАРИНА ФРИЧ
卡塔琳娜弗里奇
קתרינה פריטש
カタリーナフリッチュ
LIKE ALL FRITSCH’S WORK, RATTENKÖNIG IS SIMULTANEOUSLY SEDUCTIVE AND UNNERVING. SHE OFTEN TRANSFORMS QUOTIDIAN OBJECTS OR ORDINARY LOOKING FIGURES INTO SOMETHING NEW AND STRANGE THROUGH REPETITION AND MANIPULATION OF SCALE AND COLOR. HER SCULPTURES ARE THE RESULT OF A TIME-CONSUMING PROCESS: A PIECE IS USUALLY MOLDED BY HAND, THEN CAST IN PLASTER, REWORKED, AND THEN CAST AGAIN IN POLYESTER.

Mi-Kyoung Lee

The repetitive process of mark making has been a great strength in my work. I allow my intellect and body to follow the rhythmic processes of repetition, understanding the relationships between tool and material, the material and process, and image and content.

jae eun shin

Paper Jewellery
“My work can be recognised by its variety of transformable and interchangeable forms, by the idea of repetition and for its simplicity. A simple pattern has a great potential to transforms itself into a myriad of complex images simply by repetition. The continuity in space of this repeated simple pattern creates orientation and movement, drawing the attention of the viewer to its rhythmic flow […]”

KATHARINA FRITSCH

Катарина Фрич
卡塔琳娜弗里奇
קתרינה פריטש
カタリーナフリッチュ
Like all Fritsch’s work, Rattenkönig is simultaneously seductive and unnerving. She often transforms quotidian objects or ordinary looking figures into something new and strange through repetition and manipulation of scale and color. Her sculptures are the result of a time-consuming process: a piece is usually molded by hand, then cast in plaster, reworked, and then cast again in polyester.

KATHARINA FRITSCH

КАТАРИНА ФРИЧ
卡塔琳娜弗里奇
קתרינה פריטש
カタリーナフリッチュ
LIKE ALL FRITSCH’S WORK, RATTENKÖNIG IS SIMULTANEOUSLY SEDUCTIVE AND UNNERVING. SHE OFTEN TRANSFORMS QUOTIDIAN OBJECTS OR ORDINARY LOOKING FIGURES INTO SOMETHING NEW AND STRANGE THROUGH REPETITION AND MANIPULATION OF SCALE AND COLOR. HER SCULPTURES ARE THE RESULT OF A TIME-CONSUMING PROCESS: A PIECE IS USUALLY MOLDED BY HAND, THEN CAST IN PLASTER, REWORKED, AND THEN CAST AGAIN IN POLYESTER.

ISABELLE SCHAD

COLLECTIVE JUMPS / COLLECTIVE JUMPS (EXCERPTS)
Projekt von Isabelle Schad und Laurent Goldring
’The group’s body is made out of many. We exercise practices that have the potential to unite instead of individualize. We understand these practices as a relationship to oneself and to one another, as a pathway. These practices are biological ones, cellular ones, energetic ones. We look at freedom in relation to form : to form that is made of and found by an inner process and its rhythms. Rhythm creates the form. Therefore, there is multitude, multiplicity, subjectivity, and variation : variation within repetition.We look at freedom as the essence of happiness. We experience happiness when the flow of movement can be done together and be maintained. We look at freedom that is guaranteed once everyone within a group can find form in a subjective way. Therefore, there is a specific relation to the term equality : Everyone can be equal, once subjectivity in one‘s own respective rhythm is guaranteed within the form.’I.Schad

Sara Favriau

La redite en somme, ne s’amuse pas de sa répétition singulière

ELIZABETH MCALPINE

’98m

Le travail d’Elizabeth McAlpine est souvent lié à la question du temps et à l’expérience du regard. Dans « The Height of the Campanile », l’artiste a calculé la durée de son film en fonction de la hauteur de son sujet, le Campanile, de sorte qu’au final la longueur de la pellicule soit équivalente à celle de la tour. De même, le temps nécessaire pour visionner le film et le rythme du travelling effectué par la caméra correspondent. Ainsi, tandis que nombre des oeuvres de McAlpine sont basées sur le montage, la répétition et la fragmentation, « 98m » se présente comme un simple plan-séquence.
L’image, au grain apparent, est projetée au mur à la taille d’une carte postale, pendant que le film forme une boucle au sein d’une structure en verre pensée par l’artiste. La taille de la projection rappelle que Venise est devenue une destination touristique incontournable. L’utilisation du Super 8 est une évocation de la pratique amateur – précédant l’invention de la vidéo, du touriste fixant le souvenir de ses vacances pour le projeter une fois rentré à la maison. Si ce support procure à l’oeuvre un caractère daté, la boucle continue et hypnotique formée par la pellicule suggère au contraire une certaine intemporalité, semblable à celle que peut ressentir le touriste qui découvre San Marco.

COCOLAB

Cycles

Created by COCOLAB from Mexico and commissioned by ARCA, Cycles is an audio visual installation comprised of a series of laser projectors to visualise short cycle audio compositions by a collection of A/V artists including Julian Placencia – Disco Ruido (MX), Shiro Schwarz (MX), Eduardo Jiménez (MX), Tijs Ham (NL) and Sebastian Frisch (DE). The concept of the installation relies on the idea that our lives are ruled and defined by cycles. Cycles which at their core appear to be chaos, however at a distance they reveal to us the harmony and beauty of each repetition and their infinite possibilities. Our daily interaction with life’s cycles is an invitation to take the space and reflection time necessary to change our perspective.

Arnold Schönberg

In a twelve-tone composition, every note can be accounted for as being a member of the original series or one of its permutations, providing unity to the piece as a whole. Additionally, a twelve-tone series is a repository of intervals and can be seen as an outgrowth of atonal music with its emphasis on interval over chord or scale. The basic premises of twelve-tone music are as follows: 1- All twelve notes of the chromatic scale must occur; 2-No note can be repeated in the series until the other 11 notes of the chromatic scale have occurred (exceptions include direct repetition of a note, trills, and tremolos); 3-The series can be inverted, retrograded, and the inversion can be retrograded; 4-The order of notes in a series remains fixed, without reordering.

DAVID WILSON

ديفيد ويلسون
דיוויד וילסון
THE JAPANESE POPSTARS LET GO
Let Go est le nom du dernier clip du groupe The Japanese Popstars, réalisé par David Wilson et produit par Serena Noorani et Tamsin Glasson, du studio londonien Colonel Blimp. La vidéo s’est achevée en septembre, après 20 jours de travail intense. La répétition présente dans la musique a ouvert l’espace pour une animation psychédélique, et le thème (lâcher prise) semble avoir guidé le processus de création du clip, qui se développe comme une association libre de pensées. Les illustrations sont de Keaton Henson.

MEMO AKTEN

Simple Harmonic Motion study #5d

Behind the different incarnations, at the heart of the project lies the concept of creating complexity from simplicity. Through the use of custom software, a number of ‘agents’ are created and assigned a simple behavior. Each follow an extremely simple repetitive pattern of movement and sound. On their own, each agent is relatively monotonous, basic and mechanical. The repetition duration, motion and sound of each agent is precisely tuned such that the collection of all agents moving together, creates a unique, evolving and complex composition – both visually and sonically.The seed of inspiration comes from the motion of pendulums and other fundamental oscillatory phenomena which exhibit simple harmonic motion. The project extracts and amplifies these complex patterns, both through visual abstraction and emphasis; and also through sonifying the phenomena and creating musical patterns driven by the same equations that dictate the behaviour.

80 MESH

the shape of sound

80 mesh – the shape of sound’ is a project that investigates fragmentation, reconstruction and repetition generated through the morphogenetic
possibilities of sound waves – visualized through the modeling of fine grain sand. the work was curated by ravenna-based cultural association
marte and born from a collaboration under the artists group CaCO3 – coordinated by daniele torcellini. the multidisciplinary artwork – informed by the research of the german physicist ernst chladni – is a device composed of three 50 x 50 cm metallic plates that are placed horizontally alongside each other, with a quantity of garnet sand (80 mesh references the particles size) homogeneously dispersed over the plates. the dishes were electrically linked to the sound waves produced by an onde martenot – an early electronic musical instrument invented in 1928 with a similar sound to a theremin – played by ratsimandresy.

GABEY TJON

Repetition At My Distance

BRIAN ENO

Брайан Ино
브라이언 이노
ブライアン·イーノ
בריאן אינו
براين إينو
Брайан Ино
Music for Airports
Initially, he referred to these quiet soundscapes as “discreet” music, and on Discreet Music (a wry deconstruction of “Pachelbel’s Canon in D”) demonstrates his basic tools: minimal melodies, subtle textures, and variable repetition. Around this time, he had also been collaborating with the German synth duo Cluster on a pair of moody, coloristic electronic albums, selections from which may be found on the Begegnungen and Begegnungen II compilations. But it was Music for Airports that finally codified these experiments into an aesthetic, and even provided a label for the sound: ambient music.

STEVE REICH

スティーヴ・ライヒ
סטיב רייך
스티브 라이히
Стив Райх
Vermont Counterpoint
Vermont Counterpoint (1982) a été commandé par le flûtiste Ransom Wilson et est dédié à Betty Freeman. Il est composé pour trois flûtes alto, trois flûtes, trois piccolos et une partie solo, tous préenregistrés sur bande, plus une partie solo en direct. Le soliste en direct joue de la flûte alto, de la flûte et du piccolo et participe au contrepoint en cours ainsi qu’à des mélodies plus étendues. La pièce pourrait être interprétée par onze flûtistes, mais elle est principalement destinée à un solo avec bande. La durée est d’environ dix minutes. Dans ce laps de temps relativement court, quatre sections dans quatre touches différentes, avec la troisième dans un tempo plus lent, sont présentées. Les techniques de composition utilisées consistent principalement à construire des canons entre de courts motifs mélodiques répétitifs en substituant des notes à des silences, puis en jouant des mélodies qui résultent de leur combinaison. Ces mélodies ou motifs mélodiques qui en résultent deviennent alors la base de la section suivante au fur et à mesure que les autres parties environnantes de la bande contrapuntique disparaissent. Bien que les techniques utilisées en incluent plusieurs que j’ai découvertes dès 1967, la vitesse de changement relativement rapide (il y a rarement plus de trois répétitions d’une mesure), la modulation métrique dans et hors d’un tempo plus lent, et des changements de clé relativement rapides peuvent bien créer une impression plus concentrée et concise.

Steve Reich